Take the 2-minute tour ×
Personal Productivity Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people wanting to improve their personal productivity. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have several responsibilities which in theory require me to take considered actions, but in practice many of those actions are emphemeral - such as the responsibility to manage certain types of risk, or the commitment to treat my colleagues with care and respect. While these activities are mostly embedded in everyday behaviour, they do occasionally generate an action such as performing a risk assessment for the first example, or reflecting on stakeholder interactions for the second.

In particular these are things that I feel deserve time at the weekly review. So would GTD treat them as projects, or another kind of thing?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

A GTD Project will have an outcome and is generally expected to be done within a year or so.

The things you list sound more like they are components of what GTD describes as "Areas of Focus", also known as the 20,000 foot level (with the runway being tasks, 10,000 feet is current projects, 30,000 feet is 1-3 year goals, 40,000 feet is 5 year goals, and 50,000 feet your overall life purpose).

Typical in many people's areas of focus are things like "Parent", "Spouse", "Manager", "Physical Fitness", "Mental Health", "Homeowner", and so on. They're topics or areas you have a responsibility toward, but no expectation of a time when they are done.

Within an area of focus, it is common to have lists of things that are related to that area, and to use that list in a review.

So I think "Areas of Focus" or "Roles" is what you are looking for, rather than Projects. I generally review mine monthly to see if there are any projects that should be created for any of them, and if I am keeping them all in balance.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.