Take the 2-minute tour ×
Personal Productivity Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people wanting to improve their personal productivity. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of the things I do which makes handling paper documents much easier, is to print out in booklet format. With a duplex A3 printer, I can print out a document of 60 A4 pages onto 15 sheets of A3 (in the US, I presume that you would make a booklet of Letter pages onto Tabloid sheets). Three staples, one near the top and bottom edge and one in the middle make a really secure binding.

Below around 60 pages this works really well, but above I start to get problems. Most long-arm staplers say they can cope with up to 25 sheets. Unfortunately, my experience is that at around 15 sheets, most long-arm staplers require you to make several attempts to staple (removing the mangled staple on each failed attempt) which makes the stapling process take much longer (even with a staple extractor).

When I get above 100 page documents, I have even more problems.

I have tried using a heavy duty stapler, which can staple up to 100 sheets (so 400 page documents, though above 50 sheets gets too unwieldy anyway) but you can only ever staple at the top and bottom edge, and even then you have to staple at an angle, since the width of the page doesn't fit into the throat of the stapler.

I've found a few long-arm staplers that are described as heavy duty but they look no different to normal long-arm staplers, so I doubt their claims to staple more than 25 sheets. What I'm really after is a long arm version of the Rexel Giant, with it's cantilever action to reduce the force required to staple many sheets, but I can't find one.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would suggest this Mini Booklet Stapler:

Mini Booklet Stapler

or this Swingline Saddle Stapler for Center Stitch and Binding Stapling.

Swingline Saddle Stapler for Center Stitch and Binding Stapling

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, just knowing the term Saddle Stapler makes it much easier to find appropriate devices. –  Mark Booth Jan 12 '12 at 10:55

You've already set things up as a booklet and printed them as such so you could bind it as a booklet instead of using staples.

All you need is some cheap Elmer's glue, a paper cutter, a sheet of cardstock, and two big heavy objects.

  1. Cut the pages in half with the paper cutter.
  2. Slather glue in the middle-ish area of the cardstock (easiest to just put the stack of paper down on the cardstock and doodle the outline).
  3. Put the stack of paper down on the glue
  4. Fold the cardstock to look a bit like a book
  5. Stick the instant book between the 2 big heavy objects.
  6. Wait a few minutes for glue to dry.

Note: The pages will be a bit ragged on the sides.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure this is a suggestion to improve productivity? Also, why would I print as a booklet (using more expensive A3 paper) and then cut it in half, rather than just print double sided on A4? –  Mark Booth Jan 17 '12 at 16:03

This Novus B54 heavy-duty long-arm stapler supposedly can handle 170 sheets. You get what you pay for -- not cheap.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
That looks absolutely perfect, now if only I could find a supplier in the UK. *8'( –  Mark Booth Jan 12 '12 at 11:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.