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I have recently begun using a Kanban style system to work through my tasks. I've adopted this system because quite a few of my tasks are long-term, ranging from several days to several weeks.

At the moment I have these longer term projects which I am using with Kanban, but I also have daily tasks, which I used to write down, such as 'post letter', buy new pair of shoes' etc - basically stuff to be done that day - nothing long term. Then I have other tasks which are done daily, such as reading for an hour, going to the gym or attending to my morning rituals.

Now, the Kanban system doesn't seem to cater to these daily rituals, or repetitive tasks. How do I manage these? That is, how do I make them 'tasks' by giving them a higher status to motivate myself to get them done.

Secondly, is it worth using a Kanban for the daily tasks, such as those mentioned above, or should I continue to use my written diary where I usually write them and cross them as they are completeled?

(I am very new to kanban, so don't know if it'll work for me. One of my problems have been juggling too many tasks at once, the kanban might help me here restricting the amount I work on.)

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marked as duplicate by THelper, Jan Doggen, Dennis S., Rory Alsop Dec 3 at 15:46

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2 Answers 2

Take a look at http://www.personalkanban.com/pk/designpatterns/the-sequestering-approach-and-personal-kanban/:

... sequester them in a “repeating tasks” category. On the white board you can list these in a sequestered box, simply checking them off when complete. Then, erase the checkbox when they need to be done again. ... Why bother having the sequestered elements on your board at all? Because the kanban helps visualize your overhead, which your brain will use as input when you are prioritizing and scheduling.

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The problem with this Kanban system is that whilst it is good at managing larger goals and encouraging completion, it doesn't work alongside repetitive tasks very well. I'm struggling to factor in my day 1 hour of reading, 2 hours of studying and 2 hours at the gym. This means I only have 4 or 5 hours of 'kanbanable' time. –  User_2313 Jun 5 at 11:41

As a part of using personal Kanban it is important to only put things as cards that require the proper staging, working/waiting, done flow.

Most of the personal Kanban tips I found was only make cards for things that will take 4 hours of work minimum.

What has worked for me is to keep my personal Kanban board for projects and then I keep reoccurring tasks either scheduled on my calendar (in 30-60 minute appointments) or set up as simple tasks in remember the milk. I was using RTM before I started a personal Kanban board so it was natural for me to just keep this task list as a reminder of small things I need to get done. Each task in RTM can usually be done in <30 minutes and I often check that list first thing in the morning or after lunch when I need to get back into the mindset of doing work.

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I adopted Kanban to attempt to increase the speed at which projects get one. My problem initially was to take on too much at a time, with each project making no, or minimal progress in a week. I can limit the number of items I have in my processing column at any one time. Using a to-do list allows me to add them without any restriction. I have tasks which might take me an hour to complete and have decided to put them on my Kanban because I know they'll get done that way as I'll have limited the amount of tasks to do, thus no excuses. I will experiment how well it works. –  User_2313 Jun 4 at 16:01

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