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23

Memory is built on 3 components: 1. Impression 2. Association 3. Repetition A single one of these components can be enough to memorize anything. However, weaving the 3 components together is the most secure way to remember anything - once and for all. Let me illustrate each component: Impression: When you are very impressed by something (an idea, a ...


14

There is no any secret. Look, our life will be over some day. I think, we must live. Not just exist, but live. If you have a dream, if you do want something, you'll "burn". You will work to realize your dream. And doing this, you'll be happy. You'll find yourself. But if you get up every morning, have a breakfast, go to work/school/institute, have a lunch, ...


12

43 folders - Getting started with Getting Things Done outlines: identify all the stuff in your life that isn’t in the right place (close all open loops) get rid of the stuff that isn’t yours or you don’t need right now create a right place that you trust and that supports your working style and values put your stuff in the right place, ...


12

Maybe it's better to do your reading at another place, where you can do it fully comfortable and let your wife watch TV comfortably as well. When you are not doing something together and you don't pay attention to each other, you would only restrict (limit) each other. Then you could be bad-tempered because of bad reading condition or your wife could be ...


11

The key to memorizing information is both practice and repetition. Since this was a debate, it's quite possible that the debater prepared for the event by examining the issue from all sides, which is a common technique used by debaters. Understanding the other sides of the issue helps prepare to rebut the other arguments. So, if you know you are likely to ...


10

I recommend these two first: Allen, David: Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress Free Productivity. Covey, Stephen: Seven Habits of Highly Effective People Then there are a lot of others that may have something useful to offer, but if you're looking for "really really must read" these are what to start with.


10

I used Think and Grow Rich to reach my goals. And then I forgot about it. Napolean Hill's main theme, in my humble opinion, is holding one dominant thought, in your mind, until it comes true in reality. Dominant thought plus your belief in it will make your dominant thought come true. I used it to get to university when I was younger. I was told that I was ...


10

It's up to what I expect from that book. If I read it because I want to know how to do something I never know it before, I will read and try to code all along (and also do some exercise). That give me some taste of that thing. If I read it because I want to know some concepts behind something, often when I try to learn something new, I will focus on why ...


10

While some of these are well respected books, reading them will not change anything you do...practicing the techniques described in them will. So don't read them all at once. Read one, extract the techniques that work for you. Practice them and embed them in your daily routines and mental toolset. Then go on to the next book if needed. And sometimes a ...


8

how about headphones with white noise? Bit of a google found http://cantonbecker.com/music/white-noise-sleep-sounds/mp3s.php, which appears to supply mp3s... EDIT - I've also just wandered accross this: http://simplynoise.com/, which is entirely devoted to white noise...


8

A teacher of a productivity workshop once taught me that listening to classical music with approximately 60 beats per minute will calm you down, improve your focus and make you more creative all at the same time. I've experimented with it myself at work (I am a programmer) and it certainly does help me focus. If you use headphones, you can also use it for ...


7

Give your wife a set of good wireless headphones that will work with your TV so that you are not disturbed!!


7

Been there, and after twenty years, I am still there actually :) A bit of Zen wisdom might lighten the pain: most knowledge that are not technical comes from within. If one can understand and accept that, one gets less stressed about the number of books that are waiting to be read. Remember that books are books, and some tips that make sense, are not ...


6

Getting Things Done, by David Allen. Allen, a management consultant and executive coach, provides insights into attaining maximum efficiency and at the same time relaxing whenever one needs or wants to. Readers learn that there is no single means for perfecting organizational efficiency or productivity; rather, the author offers tools to focus energies ...


5

Disclaimer - I'm writing this from the point of view of someone who can already program, if you were learning your first programming language the answer would be very different. I avoid doing the exercises because I believe that the structure of programming books hasn't really updated to reflect the rise of the internet (oh they put their source code ...


5

Stephen Covey, although also considered a management guru, is definitely one of the most well-known and sold personal productivity authors. His 1989 7 habits of hightly effective people is still one of the most must-read books around.


5

You don't need to read the book to know what GTD is or even how to use it. You want to read the whole book because it explains why GTD is and provides examples and repetitions to link GTD issues and solutions to your real life - making it more sticky. Just make sure to read the first - original - GTD book. That's what contains sweat, blood and tears. The ...


5

As a philosophy student, I often need to read multiple long texts and synthesise the most important information from them. This is different from reading a textbook, because textbooks are (usually) more dense than prose. This is my strategy to gain information on a subject from books: Notes While you are reading, take notes. Short notes, just to remind ...


5

In order to relax under difficult encounters you need to physically train yourself not to react in the fight or flight mode. You’ve acknowledged that you are probably experiencing an Amygdala hijack. That’s a great first step. It means you recognize the problem and are willing to do something about it. You realize that the challenge is to not to react ...


4

Make her a deal where you throw away the TV but she gets something else in return.


4

There is a great book that describes that problem (and many others) - it's called "Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactor your wetware" by Andy Hunt, author of Pragmatic Programmer (another great book!). He writes in a general manner but his book is addressed to software developers. Basically Andy proposes a process of deliberate reading as a way of ...


4

My answer is along the same vein as others, with a focus on repetition. Different people will learn best working with details/content in different ways, but the key is to work with the material. By "work with the material" I mean that you have to immerse yourself in these details (reading, listening, sharing, discussing, summarizing, diagramming, ...


3

Whatever you think, will happen. Dream big, big things happen. Worry about problems, you will get more problems.


3

Before reading the book, I watched David Allen's YouTube presentation which immediately gave me plenty of new ideas to improve my previous systems. After a couple weeks of changing and creating new systems, I was ready for more new ideas, so I read the book. Now I'm ready for more new ideas again, and here productivity.SE is blossoming with ideas. ...


3

The best method I know of is to read something with the intent of teaching someone else what you have just learned. You will be amazed how differently you consume content.


2

I read the "The Evelyn Wood Seven-day Speed Reading And Learning Program" book.


2

Spd Rdng - The Speed Reading Bible Haven't read it, but have good reviews: Turned a book hater into a book worm Great speed reading techniques These are Life Changing Skills


2

The Power of Full Engagement is right up there with GTD for me, it's a book that's completely changed how I see my workflow, especially dealing with purpose, energy and breaks. It goes along nicely with The Pomodoro Technique as the latter is a method to the motivation behind the former.


2

Two more possibilities: Turn off the TV sound and enable subtitles for her, if supported in your region. Market it by how it improves spelling and keeps you in the same room :) Consider audiobook versions of your books, the abridged versions if available. I typically listen to audiobooks (and TV recordings) at double-speed too to cater for the speed ...


2

The Pomodoro Technique was developed by Francesco Cirillo and is aimed at establishing a standard to measure productivity. Roughly, the technique consists in scheduling 5 minutes breaks after 25 minutes of focused work. Every of these 25 minutes is named "pomodoro" and every succesfull pomodoro is a +1 in your productivity report. Popularity It's hard to ...



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