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7

I'd go with the same method posted here: Hit Ctrl + F Type in part of the link's text you want to open Hit F3 if the found text is not on the link When it is, press Esc, this makes the link in focus Hit [Ctrl] Enter (ctrl is to open it in a new tab)


6

Try VimFx for Firefox Example Press f and all links get labelled with letters. See screenshot: Type for example the letters hk (you don't need to press Shift to capitalize them), and you have effectively "clicked" the Questions link with your keyboard -- and pretty fast for that matter. More examples Typing Shift+f labels all links with letters as ...


5

If you can, read it later. There are dozens of great services, like Pocket or Instapaper, that allows you to save texts, files and even entire web-pages to read them later, when you have finished your other tasks. They are great, since you can also have offline versions of site-pages and you can install them on tablets/smartphones. This should prevent you ...


5

I suffered the exact problem. Over the years, I've learned a couple methods/tools that helped. But in general, it's more of a habit/process issue than the lack of hardware. I'll first talk about some tools: For browser tabs, I like 'one tab' or something like 'simple window saver' (for chrome). Just find a session managing extension that helps you quickly ...


4

Ktimetracker Although I have no experience with this particular software, it might suit your needs. It's from KDE, so if you are using other Desktop Environment it might install a lot of dependencies. https://www.kde.org/applications/utilities/ktimetracker/


3

Try out Pentadactyl or Vimperator if you want to navigate your browser using your keyboard. It will help a lot if you can already use vim or emacs.


3

What i do to be "one of the updated" is less hands on courses on new techs but following hackers, who are well known in their respective communities, to get something like a birds eye view of the industry. This way you don't have to spend time going through the information right away, but you still have good chances to not miss anything usefull. You could, ...


3

I also tend to "multitask" heavily on my Kubuntu Laptop, especially when working intensively on different projects as a college student. However I was pretty ok with it once I got a little bit organized. Additionally I have a heavy tendency to procrastination, so it is important as well for me to separate work from entertainment. I also work in 3, sometimes ...


3

Use OneTab. It is a Chrome/Firefox extension. It allows you to - with a single right click - move all your 500 tabs into a list that is then persistent. This is better than bookmarking them, especially if you only want to read them once and because bookmarking 500 items is a pain.


3

I highly recommend Pentadactyl for Firefox, or Vimium for Chrome or Opera. They give vim-like (ie., highly efficient) keyboard control over the web browser. Links are given shortcuts, so any on-screen link should be at most a few keystrokes away. Pentadactyl, and to a lesser extent Vimium & VimFx, rely on Vim keys and similar mnemonics for shortcuts, ...


2

Bookmarking alternative Emacs org-mode. Using org-protocol, you can add links to your notes. My browser bookmark bar is empty; I had hundreds of old archived bookmark files that I had little hope of getting through. I converted them to org-mode files (probably using pandoc), and quickly sorted, cleaned out and extracted what I might actually need. So now, ...


2

It having been almost two months since I asked this question, and with the knowledge and observation of what I’m doing with two monitors over that time, here’s an update and what I’m currently thinking. I’d be happy to have additional answers to consider! Two widescreen monitors is too much real estate to take in as primary workspace. (2 @ 1920x1200) My ...


2

I used to have a 24" LCD in addition with my MBP 15". Here are some of the use cases: Coding: IDE on primary screen and resource on secondary screen. Reading: Take notes on primary, material on secondary. Web programming: IDE on primary, webpage result on secondary. productivity: GTD tools on secondary for reference, e.g. OmniFocus or Evernote where you ...


2

It is difficult not to multitask in the modern environment. I think simplifying can be an answer to your question. Try to create good organized bookmark system. Using bookmarks can be a good way to reduce the amount of tabs on your browser. Also general simplifying as one task per time is a good exercise to improve your productivity. I tend to use chrome ...


2

I use Hamster. It meets all your requirements. I have mine set to track to the nearest 1/10 of an hour (6 minutes). If there is inactivity for that period, it stops tracking but also every 6 minutes a 5-second tiny window pops up in the corner to remind you as to which project you're currently tracking against...to included you're currently not tracking ...


2

There is no need to create an entirely new distribution to solve this problem. Install the software wmctrl. Write a BASH script and launch it whenever you start X. This should control whether these applications are hidden or visible at certain times. Here is a basic script, although you may need to make some changes to make it work properly: #!/bin/bash ...


1

going to dev user groups helps me discover the latest tools / technologies and help spark interest. having personal projects helps me explore new technologies and get practical experience with them (rather than theory) learning keyboard shortcuts and optimizing repetitive tasks (snippets, etc...) helps me get stuff done faster getting all my work code ...


1

I like to maintain side projects. I recommend both handling everything yourself and working on a community project on GitHub. When you handle everything yourself you can pretty easily spot the gaping holes in your knowledge base. This includes handling everything from source control to architecture to coding to presentation and aesthetics. You will see how ...


1

If you are using Linux, you can improve your productivity by using only the keyboard. First, install a keyboard-driven window manager such as Ratpoison or awesome. These window managers allow you to conveniently switch from window to window, without using the mouse. Next, select software with powerful keyboard shortcuts built-in, such as Vim. There is a ...


1

You do not say specific information about what you have to do with your computer in your work, so I would like to show you my current setup for gathering some ideas. In my work I read/write documents, data sheets and e-mails most of the time, but - as I am officially something like a software development manager - sometimes I have to write or review source ...



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