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The suggestion from @TK-421 to get some training in DiSC is a good one to help you communicate more effectively with your colleagues. What to communicate will be clearer to you with some training in assertiveness. Your colleague can't waste your time without your tacit permission. Assertiveness training will help you to take control. The same training will ...


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It might help you to take the DISC personality test and see how you and your collegue differ. Once you understand this person's basic personality, it might help for you to change the way you interact with this person. For instance, it might be worth it for you to take some time, no matter how uncomfortable, and talk with this person. Communicate expectations ...


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Your colleague who waste your time each day coming and talking to you more than 45 min on a working day You need to make it clear your busy. There are lots of subtle ways to do this without offending your colleagues. For example when they come in and start chatting pretend you were just on your way out the office. The people who have nothing better to do ...


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Work isn't fun as the game you like to play, and it shouldn't be. People that have absolute fun at work are rare. And it's idea of this era that we should all be happy all the time, doing pleasant jobs, having cool hype projects, working happily ever after. Fun and happy part comes after you finish your job, sometimes in between. You are avoiding what ...


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First, change your language. You are not lazy; you are unmotivated. There is a world of difference. If you define yourself as "lazy" you're assuming the problem is a character flaw, and that implies that it will be difficult to fix underlying issue. This will lead to further lack of interest in fixing things (You also invite comments like "just * do it", ...


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You want to finish the things as soon as possible, but the thing is you would not take immediate action and keeping delay the job (because you are too lazy to continue again). How about trying Functional/Modular Programming? Programs written in a functional style often consist of functions that take other functions as input. This is a key feature of ...


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We reason with ourselves to decide if we should do things or not. It is easy to find a reason not to work; it's too difficult, you'll do it later, you don't know where to get started, etc. We are quick to reason why we should do easy tasks and why we shouldn't do difficult tasks. I challenge you to reason why you should finish your programs, and why you ...


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Build more dynamic code. Im a lazy programmer as well, but I use my laziness as an advantage to create code libraries that can help me do my job faster. Then you can have all the time in the world for video games :-).


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I used guided mediations to 'train' me to do this. Calm and Headspace are both excellent iOS apps to achieve this. Similar principles used in both and cited in other answers: Don't beat yourself for the mind wandering, that's what it does and one of the reasons you're trying to mediate. Just bring you focus back to your breath when it does Also, try ...


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Specifically during a test the advice I hear is: move on to the next question. Not only is this efficient in time (not wasting any) but also in energy (not bothering that you don't know at that moment). That last one seems important for you. See also Manuelhe's amygdala hijack answer, you seem to have a judgment about not knowing (at that moment), which will ...


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I suggest two things: (Generalizing on Bloodcounts answer) Use external structures that force or remind you. There are tons of those you can think of: A list of (smaller) tasks and milestones, clearly visible ( It helps to plan 'back from the future': In order to accomplish C on day Z, I need to complete B on day Y, and for that I need to complete A on ...


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The short answer: Just efing do it. Force yourself if you must. The long answer: If you are a professional programmer, consult your project manager with this. Tell him that you are having trouble with your productivity and talk to him about helping you divide your work into small tasks, which you will commit on a daily basis. If you are a hobbyist / ...


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It sounds like you are experiencing an anamygdala hijack. An anamygdala hijack is your brain's response to a physical or emotional threat. This reaction prepares your body to either fight the threat or run from the threat. When one experiences an amygdala hijack, the amygdala overtakes the cerebrum (the thinking part of the brain) and there’s little or ...


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The following worked for me: Let your brain realize the importance of the subject: If these things did not have any emotional attachments (and you don't use that info on a regular basis), your brain just gets rid of that with all other useless trash (our natural built-in CLR garbage collection) If you really want to remember these topics in ...


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Sadly, the best you can do like learning most skills is practice. What you could try doing is picking up a few really technical/specific books. Something you know you'll struggle with. Try to muscle through it, but note places that don't seem clear, are confusing, or take a bit to figure out. Take a minute to get in touch with a friend or colleague that is ...


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What generally works for me is watching funny videos, sitcoms or engaging episodes. It might not make you instantly productive, but will hopefully help get the bad experience out of your head. Your mind can be a little more relaxed after the viewing. Some people suggest reading; however, I believe that reading is a more active process, and requires ...


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Some suggestions: Reduce the effects of stress by learning and applying relaxation techniques. Accept that some effects of stress are inevitable, and take measures to compensate for them. For example, double-check your calculations. Spend more time practising, as that will help you remember them under pressure more easily.



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