Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

You have two basic choices: Use the same system for home and work (e.g. a paper-based system, a PDA/smart phone, online software) and treat @Home and @Work as different contexts. This seems to be the way David Allen and others recommend, because then you only have the one system to maintain. Use a different system for home and work. This is what I prefer, ...


10

David Allen says repeatedly - though not as a first thing - that there is no difference between Home and Work for GTD. It is all project, context and actions. The main difference, I think, is that most of the time you may rely on your coworkers to do the tasks you delegated to them. That's in their contract and they are paid for it. With a spouse, you ...


8

Even if work and home tasks are separate, your GTD system needs to track both. I struggled with the same issue and ultimately discovered that using GTD only at work--doesn't work. In order to realize the benefits of getting your to do list out of your mind and into a system, that system needs to capture everything. This means whatever single system you use ...


6

I actually have a similar situation, it's rare that work and home overlap, but they do on occasion. The context idea is one way to separate home from work. So, paying bills would be an online task (at least for me), I can do that at work or home. What I have done is created two separate lists of projects and next-actions, one personnel, and one work. ...


6

Research has shown that we remember things best by spaced repetition. My grandfather summarized it when talking about an oil finish on wood: daily for a week, weekly for a month, monthly for a year, yearly for life. The same kind of process (although perhaps with different intervals) is what works for people's memories, too. See Wikipedia on spaced ...


6

So there are two things there... one is universal capture (that is, getting things from your brain to your next-actions list without losing anything on the way) and the other is context (looking at the right bit of your next actions list when in a particular context) Looking at the first one first - there are lots of universal capture methods (I've always ...


6

I think that in the Pomodoro technique they actually want you to re-establish context at the beginning of each session and that they do not consider this to be wasted time. By going over information again (termed as overlearning) it becomes more solid. It also will build your ability to keep track of the variables and structures over time. I think you should ...


5

I think it matters how much is a thought or a unit. When coding, writing a failing unit tests to keep context makes sense. This only takes a minute or two. I think this is equivalent to jotting down a note on where you are. Finishing a hourlong chunk of work wold be against the spirit of Pomodoro. I've found having the failing unit test gets me into the ...


5

There are multiple approaches you can follow here depending on how far you are willing to go to make sure you dont succumb to procrastination. These primarily focus on the problem of context switches. You can try the following to control contexts and context switches better: Multiple operating systems: Use two separate installations of the same or ...


4

No, projects are not contexts. A Context is defined by resources required to do actions that are in that context. For an example outdated by most people's current technology, you can't make phone calls on your @Phone context list unless you are somewhere with a telephone. A more subtle resource is time - you may choose to define one context for tasks ...


4

The purpose of grouping work by context is to let you do more work with less context-switching. This may be very obvious or very subtle depending on your own work and work style. For a very obvious example, if you find yourself doing this "1: @askAlice to fix server"; "2: @askBob to update contract"; "3: @askAlice for FY08 report", you'd probably be better ...


3

Not research, but I've seen people comment anecdotally that using the iPad/tablet for fun stuff and the laptop for work trains them that time wasting shouldn't occur on the laptop. I've experienced the same thing using spaces/desktops on the Mac. If a time waster app isn't in my current space/desktop, I don't use it when on an important task. The browser ...


3

I definitely prefer a unified system -- and not just because I usually work from home. I need to know what's urgent and what's low priority across the board, since sometimes personal activities will preempt work, and vice versa. The "Things" program for Mac, iPhone and iPad syncs across multiple devices; there are online-only solutions as well (Basecamp, ...


3

A thing a see a lot lately in the GTD forums is people playing with contexts and taking them a bit further. The rationale behind it is that most of us spend 90% of our time in front of a computer, so having a @computer context can be way too vague (here is a great post on the issue, with some nice examples: ...


3

While having One Trusted Place for everything in Life might be great philosophically, it isn't necessary in practical terms (and sometimes out-of-reach as you've discovered). As long as you maintain One Trusted Place for home items and One Trusted Place for workplace items you should be okay. And since your workplace is putting such restrictions on the ...


2

I do something similar. I have two "to do lists" (by choice - I like things staying separate.) I also have a yearly spiral planner where I keep track of appointments after work and things that I need/want to do over the next couple weeks that a carry around me. I started doing that this year after the old system didn't survive a bunch of work related ...


2

Since there's really only one context in the classic sense, why not use the context ordering mechanism to order your next action lists by something else. One thing I find useful is sorting my next action lists by activities, e.g. "updating social media", "researching IP issues". When I've finished an action that consisted of a specific activity class, ...


2

I have also worked in an environment where personal electronic devices are prohibited and where access to personal email accounts is blocked. This is how I learned to cope. If your situation allows, I would recommend something similar to what I described here, about using GTD at work and home. The answer discusses some RTM-specific workflows, but the ...


2

@Jer, this happens to me CONSTANTLY, and I handle it a couple different ways. But, like others have mentioned above, the idea of "taking care of it" right away is key. Do something while you're thinking about it, even if that something is writing it on your palm to remember to do later. First, I try to do the task immediately. I find that doing these ...


2

My answer is no as well, but with a my own interpretation of what projects and contexts mean to me. Projects A project is any work that takes more that one action to complete. Contexts A context is a situation or place where things can get done. It can be a specific place: like your car or the local dry cleaner store where you have to pick up your ...


2

In the same situation, I simply have 2 accounts, one for entertainment and one for work; I use windows 7 or Ubuntu so it's easy to apply. My "brain switch" is - with my surprise - the desktop background, so I set a very light desktop for entertainment and a very dark desktop for work. My 2 cents


1

In the past I used Insightly for this (no affiliation). It allows you to create contacts, organisations, opportunities, projects etc. Contacts can also be imported from your email (Gmail and Outlook integration). Each entity can then be linked to another entity and the link can contain details about how they are related. Additionally you can tag entities. ...


1

You are incorrect when you say these aren't "important" when in reality it is important since it annoys you. Also, just because a task is context-sensitive, doesn't mean it's not a "todo" that you can put on a list. For example, do you make a grocery list? That's context-sensitive: "WHEN I go to the grocery store, I'm going to pick x and y things" If ...


1

I couldn't imagine why having two or more devices for different work types would help. I've noticed that if I'm in the mood to slack off I'll find a way of doing it regardless. If you're having problems concentrating on a task for very long before your mind starts wandering then you should perhaps try something like the Pomodoro technique. You basically ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible