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11

After recently going through the job application process, and starting as a graduate consultant in a technical company, I can empathise a great deal with your situation. Here are some general tips I use to optimise the time I have to learn new things: Understand the purpose behind why you are required to learn something? If you are going to be doing ...


10

There are a few methods you can use A simple list of pros and cons: Do I really want to have a new dog/parrot? Do I want a do, Pro, it would be good company, Con, I have to walk it daily. Evaluation of cost: expensive drums that will last long or cheap drums I'll have to replace if I continue drumming. Do I buy the more expensive drums. So the more ...


7

I often use the costumer reviews from amazon. Not only for books. I read the reviews with one or two stars and the comments of these reviews. If these reviews contain good points which are backed up by arguments I can follow, these reviews give me more hints then the five or four star reviews. Also the comments on these review reveal more pros and cons. ...


6

Evaulate the "cradle-to-grave" cost. Go into the purchase with eyes wide open as to the total lifetime cost of the item. The purchase price may just be the start. This includes: Maintenance. A pet will cost you easily a few hundred dollars a year -- probably over a thousand a year. Your stuff will get peed on / pooped on / torn apart if you get a ...


4

There is a general five-step process for making decisions: Clarify what the decision actually entails. State your problem or goal. Next spell out what the decision alternatives really are. For example, if you want to buy a car, do the options only consist of different types of cars or is another option possibly to refrain from buying a car? Collect and ...


4

Is it procrastination? If you're consciously deciding to give the e-mail some thinking time (rather than just putting it off - explained below), I don't think so. Putting something on the back burner while you "let the idea stew" is a legitimate approach to creativity and decision-making - as long as you give it a bit of active thinking before it does go ...


4

What I do with these 'big choices' (choosing a job, a house etc) is use the MoSCoW methodology. Quoting from the Wikipedia article, you define what the important/less important/unimportant aspects of your choice are: M - MUST: Describes a requirement that must be satisfied in the final solution for the solution to be considered a success. S - ...


2

Planning ahead of time (at least a high-level picture) is a good way to be ready for on-the-spot decisions. It also makes it easier to make a good decision from multiple choices. Of course, this is not always possible, so then it's good to ask yourself what do you want to accomplish with the choice. Also narrow down the choices to the most practical ...


2

The ultimate advice I was given is this: If there is even a shadow of doubt, don't buy it. And it really does apply, specially with clothes.


1

All procrastination isn't bad - sometimes putting something "on the back burner" to let your unconscious mind work on it is the most productive thing you can do. And especially communication that may "rock the boat" is a good category to let sit for a little while. You may find that the issue is not as urgent as you originally felt, or on rereading a draft ...


1

I am mid-way through a book called "decisive" which is fascinating in many ways. One of the key things they talk about is that when buying most things we get into a whether or not mindset and focus on a very limited set of options...as well as the confirmation bias when you're emotionally attached to making a buying decision. For me, the things that I've ...


1

A quick tip I intuitively use is: let the time pass, so if you crave something, make a note(Mental or in your calender) of when you have this craving(and maybe why) and let time pass, i usually wait 1-3 months depending on the size of the purchase. After the time have passed. make a new assessment about this purchase and you`ll notice a difference. This is ...


1

My approach is somewhat like this: First, I like to reduce the number of books to look at. If I am at a library (which for me as a student happens a lot) I already have a small selection, so this number is already limited. But suppose you want to buy a book: Then you can try to get recommendations from colleagues or online reviews. Another approach is to ...


1

I read a lot of books (or at least, bits of books) and so I've learned a lot on how to choose good ones. Recommendations My main guiding principle is to read books that have been recommended to me: either personally or by a professional whose work and opinions I already know and respect. The more recommendations a book receives, the more likely I am to ...


1

How To Read a Book has an excellent chapter written on just this. You should be able to skim the quality of a book well within an hour, perhaps down to 5-10 minutes with practice. Start with reading the title and summary at the back of the book. It seems obvious, but a lot of people actually don't do this and even fail to read the title properly, misjudging ...


1

Visiting blogs that has book reviews can be pretty useful. The problem is that not all the books have proper reviews, and it's sometimes hard to find one if any. However, when you can find the blog, sometimes it's really useful. For example, I use Eli Bendersky's blog to check some of my programming books before buying them. Jon Skeet's review on ...



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