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8

I've had the same personal struggle several times. I'm fascinated by so many things in life and in addition I find it hard not to be competitive on practically anything, so I'm always trying to pick up a new skill. In my case however, and I don't know about your situation, I was raised with that multidisciplinary skill set. By the time I was 15 I was ...


7

I too generate a ton of ideas- most bad. I wake up in the middle of the night with random ideas. I always write them down but for me it doesn't matter where. Just putting them somewhere gets them out of my head. If I don't write them down then they are always distractingly dancing around the back of my head chanting, "don't forget me!" So I have ideas in old ...


4

If your projects are such that you don't finish them before starting another, and thus have to drop and pick them up over and over, here is a strategy that I use: Have a note (sticky notes, text file, whatever works for you) for each project you work on. When you start the project, list the big steps that will need to be done, and as you come across more ...


3

The situation you're in is called yak shaving. Within the realm of software design, it's often clear that no alternative exists to a particular A-B-C-D-E chain. You must do E. No choice. But in the wider world, you can often find other chains that lead to achieving A. A guideline: the more content you are to be puttering along on E, achieving E ...


3

There are a few things you can do immediately. Allocate your time. One hour two hours whatever you feel is necessary. Commit to working this duration. Write down what you want to have done, how you want it to look etc. Just a brief description of what you would like the outcome to be at with the time you have available. Put this where you can see it ...


3

One of the things that you should keep in mind that ideas, when they come, are the highest level and as a result they sound extremely attractive. It's when you start digging deep into the idea with market research, competitive analysis, implementation challenges, time and resources, etc. you'd come to a conclusion more often than not, that it's not that ...


3

Here is another suggestion - first, as others have said, write down the ideas as they come, to offload them from your brain. A tool like Evernote also enables tagging of the ideas for easy retrieval later. If a particular idea re-emerges at another time and/or in another context, then perhaps there is something to the idea that should be looked into, as ...


2

My version of "idea discipline" involves: 1) limiting the number of active projects; 2) rewarding the completion of projects with new ideas; and 3) avoiding stagnation with regular triage. The problem is that coming up with new ideas is way more fun than seeing the old ones through. To deal with this I have four folders on my drive: Defunct, Ideas, ...


2

I like the list from The Cult of Done Manifesto In short, the Manifesto consists of: There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done. There is no editing stage. Pretending you know what you're doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept ...


2

I would highly recommend creating a "Spark File" to keep track of your ideas. Its basically a list of your hunches or ideas in a chronological order. Thats it. Its helpful because - This is because most good ideas (whether they're ideas for narrative structure, a particular twist in the argument, or a broader topic) come into our minds as hunches: ...


2

Have you read 'Getting things done'? This book handles precisely your problem. It introduces a system that allows you to seperate your todo list from your mind. It's a must read for productive people.


2

Looking from another perspective, when you're using the pomodoro technique, you can drill down your tasks to make them smaller and when you finish a task and say you have some 3-5 minutes left, you can use this time to re-read your code, rethink your solution, improve it a little bit, etc. There is always a lack of time for these activities. I think this can ...


2

I do use Pomodoros on activities where I'm able to concentrate too. I actually use them to force myself to take breaks. I get up at least every other Pomodoro. And I'll write a unit test or put a TODO in a document so I can resume and get right back in the flow again quickly.


2

There is a difference between important tasks and necessary tasks. In your question, you actually say the right thing: it'll be necessary to do another task in preparation If you cannot get to A without doing B, C, D and E, then you either find another route, or do them all. If D, for example, is important, but you don't need it done in its entirety, ...


2

I like to use Plutchik's wheel of emotions to understand a lot of things that deal with humans and emotions. I think your problem is you feel you have too much happening and are getting a sense of being overwhelmed and confused about whether you're doing enough. Specifically look at the emotions of distraction vs focus - even I didn't think these would be ...


2

I like to keep things simple. The best method Ive found for starting (and finishing) projects is to use a combination of deferment and planning. Like you, I also suffer from idea overload. The thing is, over time I've realized that most ideas seem exciting in the present, but loose interest over time. To combat this phenomenon, I always write down my ...


1

Well, I think we might need to establish if you need to do one of those things to even start another or if you need to do one of them to only do part of another. I also think the answer will definitely depend on what kind of project you're doing. Personally, I think you might have to either focus on only one aspect until you realize you really really need ...


1

Things that helped me are: Every time you get off track, note it down, how long for and what you think triggered it. Use this information to plan against future procrastination and to see if you are making progress at beating the problem. Break down large and challenging tasks into smaller parts and use this to track your progress Sandwich tasks you hate ...


1

It was an accident. Simple. It could have been a lot worse. If you'd worked there you might have lost your job. Now that you have to pay for it all to be fixed, you could think of it like you own a little piece of the gym now because you're helping rebuild.


1

I was gearing up for the most examinations of my life a few weeks ago. I'm reasonably good at studies however, I do have a tendency of getting distracted early and taking irregular breaks which eventually end up breaking my study schedule. The reason Pomodoro works is that it establishes regularity, but with certain boundaries. The 25 minute study sessions ...


1

I face similar and have gained benefit from the perspectives of two people specifically: James Altucher and Chase Jarvis. James Altucher believes that idea formation is a process that we need to acknowledge and even goes so far to say that it is a good thing: we need to become an idea machine. He recommends forcing yourself to write down ideas every day. ...


1

Hmm. Psychoanalytics? Are those never ending ideas just a way to avoid something else? Or escape something? Why? Or, why do you want to stop generating ideas? Do they bother you? Why? You can go on.. and on. "Why" is a good tool, though somewhat dangerous. You may find what you didn't want to find.. and why you didn't want it. IMO.. ideas are a good ...


1

Welcome to the club! I've recently blogged about very same topic: Creativity is EVIL (I cannot remember a single scenario when something I did was appreciated) (quite the opposite: people in professional jobs don't like being surprised) My (firsthand) advice would be: 1) Set up a goal for 150 years. So whatever path you follow now, you'll eventually ...


1

In my language we say you should leave a party at the nicest point. By doing so it will keep you interested to come to the next party. For you it means you could tackle the problem from the other side. Just stop your task/work/project after a certain point in time. Lets say after 2h. And force yourself to do something different. And don't return to the ...


1

It's sounds like what you lack is a clear answer to the question "why am I taking on this project?". You should have a clear picture of the outcome you're seeking. Maybe so far you unconsciously seek the outcome of excitement due to the variety in your work. If this is true, in addition to the outcome you design in your mind (or better yet in a document) ...



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