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24

Idea overflow? Or Idea Processing Bottleneck? Your mind is a great place to have ideas, not to store them (as said by David Allen, author of "Getting Things Done"): I suggest you write those ideas down in a place you trust. And then move on. Build into your routine a time to review those ideas (weekly? monthly? quarterly?). A trusting place can be a ...


20

As Gruber said in his answer, Agile methodologies will suite well for you. If you decide to adopt Scrum for yourself, the key thing to remember is that no planning should be done during an iteration. This means that at the beginning of an iteration you'll plan what you'll be doing for the next 2 or 3 weeks (the iteration length can be adjusted to your needs, ...


13

Agile methodologies (such as Scrum) recognise that we cannot know what will happen in the future, and accomodate for this fact by allowing users to periodically review their backlog of things to do. Whenever you come up with a new idea --- great, add it to your backlog. Then pick it up for implementation at the next review if you think it's an idea that's ...


8

If you really want to change, you may need to work on: Knowing why it is important to be on time (intellectual) Understanding how to be on time (practical) Feeling it is important to be on time (emotional) Making it easy for yourself to be on time (environmental) One of the reasons you have not changed already is that the sanctions imposed by your ...


7

I too generate a ton of ideas- most bad. I wake up in the middle of the night with random ideas. I always write them down but for me it doesn't matter where. Just putting them somewhere gets them out of my head. If I don't write them down then they are always distractingly dancing around the back of my head chanting, "don't forget me!" So I have ideas in old ...


7

I've had the same personal struggle several times. I'm fascinated by so many things in life and in addition I find it hard not to be competitive on practically anything, so I'm always trying to pick up a new skill. In my case however, and I don't know about your situation, I was raised with that multidisciplinary skill set. By the time I was 15 I was ...


5

I know it sounds obvious, but I love to do this sort of work at libraries, particularly large ones where you can hide away from everyone. University libraries are the best if you can find one.


5

it's important to not attach negative connections to the noise (I know, it is negative). So when the noise happens don't tut, don't get frustrated. This teaches your brain that it isn't actually important, therefore you won't be 'notified' of the noise when it happens and, because you've paid it no attention it will become background noise. This is ...


4

I often feel this way—needing a sort of "clean slate" to be productive again, after a disruption. Once I "mess up" the flow, I often feel like I've already tarnished some record, and don't feel like starting right away again. Maybe some people can just tell themselves that a new start is a new start—that one shouldn't get so hung up about something that ...


4

If your projects are such that you don't finish them before starting another, and thus have to drop and pick them up over and over, here is a strategy that I use: Have a note (sticky notes, text file, whatever works for you) for each project you work on. When you start the project, list the big steps that will need to be done, and as you come across more ...


3

Here is another suggestion - first, as others have said, write down the ideas as they come, to offload them from your brain. A tool like Evernote also enables tagging of the ideas for easy retrieval later. If a particular idea re-emerges at another time and/or in another context, then perhaps there is something to the idea that should be looked into, as ...


3

In addition to my comment above (i.e, find the "perfect" place and be mindful of how well you can do for 30 minutes as a benchmark) here is something that helps me with very technical and conceptual material. Your problem sounds like a problem I used to have and sometimes still have. What I do works for me but I don't know about you or anyone else. Decide ...


3

If you've got the time and energy to try and learn a concentration technique then all power to you - I'll leave possible techniques to others to describe. On the other hand, if you want a quick win, I'd try White Noise again. With a reasonably inexpensive pair of over-the-ear headphones you can turn the volume up quite loud without bothering other people. ...


3

One of the things that you should keep in mind that ideas, when they come, are the highest level and as a result they sound extremely attractive. It's when you start digging deep into the idea with market research, competitive analysis, implementation challenges, time and resources, etc. you'd come to a conclusion more often than not, that it's not that ...


3

There are a few things you can do immediately. Allocate your time. One hour two hours whatever you feel is necessary. Commit to working this duration. Write down what you want to have done, how you want it to look etc. Just a brief description of what you would like the outcome to be at with the time you have available. Put this where you can see it ...


2

Looks like someone has created an iPhone/iPad app called Zero Inbox. Just bought it as a little gift for myself. This does solve the problem.


2

Apply the Lean Startup concept to your work. As Gruber and superM said in their answers, you should probably employ an Agile methodology to develop your product. Remember though: While Agile can provide the flexibility necessary to adapt to feedback, it won't necessarily help with your "idea overflow" problem. A flood of good ideas requires idea ...


2

My version of "idea discipline" involves: 1) limiting the number of active projects; 2) rewarding the completion of projects with new ideas; and 3) avoiding stagnation with regular triage. The problem is that coming up with new ideas is way more fun than seeing the old ones through. To deal with this I have four folders on my drive: Defunct, Ideas, ...


2

I like the list from The Cult of Done Manifesto In short, the Manifesto consists of: There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done. There is no editing stage. Pretending you know what you're doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept ...


2

I like to keep things simple. The best method Ive found for starting (and finishing) projects is to use a combination of deferment and planning. Like you, I also suffer from idea overload. The thing is, over time I've realized that most ideas seem exciting in the present, but loose interest over time. To combat this phenomenon, I always write down my ...


2

I like to use Plutchik's wheel of emotions to understand a lot of things that deal with humans and emotions. I think your problem is you feel you have too much happening and are getting a sense of being overwhelmed and confused about whether you're doing enough. Specifically look at the emotions of distraction vs focus - even I didn't think these would be ...


2

I would highly recommend creating a "Spark File" to keep track of your ideas. Its basically a list of your hunches or ideas in a chronological order. Thats it. Its helpful because - This is because most good ideas (whether they're ideas for narrative structure, a particular twist in the argument, or a broader topic) come into our minds as hunches: ...


2

Have you read 'Getting things done'? This book handles precisely your problem. It introduces a system that allows you to seperate your todo list from your mind. It's a must read for productive people.


2

I do use Pomodoros on activities where I'm able to concentrate too. I actually use them to force myself to take breaks. I get up at least every other Pomodoro. And I'll write a unit test or put a TODO in a document so I can resume and get right back in the flow again quickly.


2

I was gearing up for the most examinations of my life a few weeks ago. I'm reasonably good at studies however, I do have a tendency of getting distracted early and taking irregular breaks which eventually end up breaking my study schedule. The reason Pomodoro works is that it establishes regularity, but with certain boundaries. The 25 minute study sessions ...


1

Welcome to the club! I've recently blogged about very same topic: Creativity is EVIL (I cannot remember a single scenario when something I did was appreciated) (quite the opposite: people in professional jobs don't like being surprised) My (firsthand) advice would be: 1) Set up a goal for 150 years. So whatever path you follow now, you'll eventually ...


1

1) The chances are this is also linked to your personnality, and those are the most difficult to change. A good start would be this tool http://habitforge.com/ to get support and encouragement on creating a new habbit of being on time. You will therefore make it fun to be on time with notes from people around the world! 2)Now, it is all about willpower. If ...


1

i think a common and very useful method in many ways is meditation. the key concepts are very easy and not isoteric at all. just close your eyes and only focus on your breath. thats about everything you need. you can try counting your breaths to notice better when you cant concentrate. if any distracting thoughts come to your head, just dont give them any ...


1

I'm not sure where you're located, but I'm in a mid-sized urban area, and in the past few years we've had a number of collaborative office and workspaces pop up. The concept is this: it's a large open workspace with a handful of conference rooms and offices. They're generally geared toward creative collaboration...web developers, graphic designers, ad agency ...


1

I definitely agree with libraries being a good place, not only are they quiet with few distractions but for me they also set the right mental "tone" to do some creative mental work. I live in the rural midwest and I've also found working outside to be very nice, especially this time of year when it's not too hot nor too cold. The ambiance of wind blowing ...



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