Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

Idea overflow? Or Idea Processing Bottleneck? Your mind is a great place to have ideas, not to store them (as said by David Allen, author of "Getting Things Done"): I suggest you write those ideas down in a place you trust. And then move on. Build into your routine a time to review those ideas (weekly? monthly? quarterly?). A trusting place can be a ...


20

As Gruber said in his answer, Agile methodologies will suite well for you. If you decide to adopt Scrum for yourself, the key thing to remember is that no planning should be done during an iteration. This means that at the beginning of an iteration you'll plan what you'll be doing for the next 2 or 3 weeks (the iteration length can be adjusted to your needs, ...


15

The pitfall to learning with an IDE is that there's stuff it does for you under the hood that otherwise has to be done manually. For example, in C (don't know RoR at all, sorry), Eclipse will handle compilation/linking for you. Given a command line, you would be hopeless. What's GCC? What's a makefile? Using an IDE most of the time is fine, you just have to ...


13

Agile methodologies (such as Scrum) recognise that we cannot know what will happen in the future, and accomodate for this fact by allowing users to periodically review their backlog of things to do. Whenever you come up with a new idea --- great, add it to your backlog. Then pick it up for implementation at the next review if you think it's an idea that's ...


10

[Please note that the answer below mostly covers the 'creativity' section of your question and I would suggest you break the others out into seperate questions to get more targeted answers] First of all, don't put yourself down! You need to be in an optimistic and confident state of mind. I find that if there's too much pressure, I end up worrying about not ...


10

common man uses the brain only up to 10% It is a myth So if you want to improve your "body and mind", there are many other methods without religious context. As I understand methods of dianetics is based on mix of psychoanalysis and some shamanic practice. So in my opinion classical psychology and some sort of eastern practise (meditation, yoga, ...


9

A smart worker is one who gets the job done within specific deadline most of the time. Most of the time his boss can rely on him to get the job done (try to build this impression to your boss). According to me here how one can be a smart worker: Always always do some sort of research upfront before starting a task. Researching is the best way to save time ...


7

This is a very broad question with no right answer. But to mention a few other aspects not mentioned in the other answer: You need to be able to work in teams and be familiar with the basics of software development methodologies, such as Scrum and agile development. This is especially so if you aspire to be a team leader. Learn design patterns to know how ...


7

and I am not sure that it is not something like religion Dianetics certainly is one of the most important element for the church of Scientology. This and the claims made by the inventor (e.g. healing of certain physical illnesses) makes me think that it is not a suitable method to improve your life in any form.


7

I too generate a ton of ideas- most bad. I wake up in the middle of the night with random ideas. I always write them down but for me it doesn't matter where. Just putting them somewhere gets them out of my head. If I don't write them down then they are always distractingly dancing around the back of my head chanting, "don't forget me!" So I have ideas in old ...


6

The main features of an IDE are: Code completion Building/executing Debugging I would say that it is very useful to learn how to build, execute and debug your software from the command line. IMO, that is the most useful skill you learn by not using an IDE. Once you know how to do that, try out Ruby IDEs and see if one of them suits you better than using ...


6

Are you more effective with or without stress? it depends if stress is manageable (I am a software developer, I have a big and interesting task to do, I have everything I need (all infrastructure libraries are working fine, I have lots of great working examples etc) - but the time is very limited and, lets say, I have to deliver my first working ...


6

Stress by itself is neither good nor bad. Eustress is good stress; distress is bad stress. If you know what you want to work toward, and are given the freedom to do so, then creating deadlines for yourself should be a help. If the only pressure is from yourself, then you can learn from the times you don't meet your deadlines. It would be bad for you to ...


5

There are more than a few points to ponder here. Are you wanting answers within 2 seconds of hearing a question or 2 hours? There is something to be said for how big of a window do you have on answering the question, what format is the answer to take, and a few other things that may be worth noting here as I'd imagine it is one thing to brainstorm an idea ...


5

This is why brainstorming or 'blue sky thinking' can be very useful when trying to break out of a rut. Instead of analysing a possible solution, these techniques encourage you to write down many ideas - without being judgemental, so no calling out a specific idea as silly or unworkable - just write them all down and then go back and review each one. This ...


4

You need to allow yourself to be bored. Make time to think, to let your mind wander. Your brain cannot both consume information and produce new ideas at the same time. When you are bored, your creativity is triggered. So, put aside some time every day when you don't read, listen or watch anything -- but just think quietly and calmly for at least 30 minutes. ...


4

"Measure 3 times, cut once." When I'm assigned to build an application, I don't go and open my development tools. I grab a pencil and paper and then I think about the application & the problem. I analyse it to it's core; I write down the list of problems I have to solve; I list requirements of the application. In this stage I determine exactly WHAT has ...


3

Game designer Chris Crawford addresses this in Chapter 7 of his book, On Game Design. I think he described it well in the start of one of the segments: The best strategy is to stuff your head full of concepts and all their associations. After all, the bigger the web of associations at your disposal, the greater the chance that you'll find some odd ...


3

Searching This seems like a good ratio. You can however try to improve your search to get more chances to find what you're searching for. Create an organized list of search material to refer to when you need something. When you run in an intersting site with good references, mark it down in your favorites or in a file. Do the same with a book. Some are ...


3

Stress must first be defined, which is not easy. Lets take a mechanical approach to start with. Stress is a measure of the internal forces acting within a deformable body. Similarly, strain is defined to be a measure of how the object deforms (reacts) to stress. For example, an external force on a spring causes stress in the spring material and the spring ...


3

Yes, I think everyone needs a little stress or they'll spend their excess mental power procrastinating (like what I'm doing now). Nature takes the path of least resistance; stress gives high resistance to doing everything you're not supposed to be doing. I remember hearing a radio interview with one of the leading advertising agencies in my country, who ...


3

Along with importance, tasks to do may have other characteristics: Urgency - simply speaking, a task may become obsolete at certain time; Effort - amount of expenses you have to take to complete it (time is also expense); Expected result - it may not be only money or something material. Received knowledge is also a benefit, for example; Context - some ...


3

Here is another suggestion - first, as others have said, write down the ideas as they come, to offload them from your brain. A tool like Evernote also enables tagging of the ideas for easy retrieval later. If a particular idea re-emerges at another time and/or in another context, then perhaps there is something to the idea that should be looked into, as ...


3

One of the things that you should keep in mind that ideas, when they come, are the highest level and as a result they sound extremely attractive. It's when you start digging deep into the idea with market research, competitive analysis, implementation challenges, time and resources, etc. you'd come to a conclusion more often than not, that it's not that ...


2

If this is the first language you're learning or you've never worked with a similar language in the same environment, than using basic tools will help you learn a lot (the answers above bring numerous advantages). But if you already know other languages, and you can do without an IDE when using them, I think you needn't start from basic tools again. This ...


2

The reason to use notepad or the like is that you don't rely on autocomplete as you learn. This makes you more attentive to syntax and method names. It also gives you more understanding of how the tooling works. In the cases of Ruby on Rails, how do you generate code, what commands, what controls you have, etc.


2

Apply the Lean Startup concept to your work. As Gruber and superM said in their answers, you should probably employ an Agile methodology to develop your product. Remember though: While Agile can provide the flexibility necessary to adapt to feedback, it won't necessarily help with your "idea overflow" problem. A flood of good ideas requires idea ...


2

Humans are not robots. We know from research that motivation is a crucial factor when it comes to productivity. So if a task has no value whatsoever for a person, motivation will be zero --- you cannot expect productivity. (This question may be off-topic for being too opinion based.)


2

Plan-Do-Check-Act would be a process I'd highly recommend putting into place in your work so that you review what you are doing and make adjustments on a regular basis to what you do. While the first couple of times you do something there will be a learning curve, the key point is how well do you apply what you learn going forward. Have points in time to ...


2

1) make sure you prepare before the meeting. - gather company standards documents. - gather any documents from previous reviews. - review achievements and accomplishments over the period. - review any negatives or failures over the period. - list any factors that have affected performance. - list any extra efforts taken. 2) Listen. - Start off ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible