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6

Have you looked into Inbox by Google? It has the exact feature you're looking for, and integrates very well into Android phones and Google Now. It group messages similar to the new "tabs" feature in Gmail but also allows you to "snooze" emails for any time in the future, and also add reminders within the app that show up when they need to. Say, for ...


4

I use a variant of the "43 folders". Suppose I have an email I need to work on on December 1st. I have an Outlook folder (of course, this also works on other email clients) called "2014-12-01", where I drag the email. Every day in the morning, I go through the folder for the corresponding day, and I'll find my email there and can follow up. When I've gone ...


4

The base concept behind "inbox zero" is that you process incoming mail one time, and don't need to go back to look at it again to see if there is anything you need to do. After you have looked at it that first time, you make whatever notes or entries needed in your productivity system, and the email can then be discarded or archived, depending on what your ...


4

I use inbox zero because I don't rely on the unread count for determining what items need to be processed. Remember, the inbox is a basket or bucket that holds things until they are processed into the GTD system e.g. throw away, to do, delegate, etc. Once I pull the actions out of the mail item, I have no need for it to remain in my "to process" bucket. If ...


4

In Outlook you can use "Follow Up" flags to mark the email, this will add a task to your Outlook task list to follow up the mail at a later time. I'm sure similar functionality does exist in Thunderbird, either native or via a plugin. Several solutions have been posted in a Super User thread.


3

You might want to check out http://gmailmeter.com/, which is analytics for gmail.


2

A super-crude way to do this: You can easily log how many mails you receive during the day using IFTTT.com and dropbox; you can add a recipe that logs every email received in a text file in dropbox. You can log how many mails you send through the day by counting what is in your sent items. But I'd suggest something even cruder. Grab a sheet of paper, ...


2

After being asked for clarification on my comment, I thought I'd write an answer. Workflow optimisation is the act of optimising the process of doing actual work. For example: Implementing a general reference system (a box of file folders with labels) would be considered workfflow optimisation, but using that system would be actual work. It's important to ...


1

For me I'm a strong believe in Inbox zero. Basically first thing in the morning anything in my inbox gets sorted into "Review later", "Trash", and "Archive" Archive is anything I might need to refer to at a later date that requires no further action. (this is organized into subfolders for easier retrieval should I need to look back at something there) ...


1

Followupthen has been mentioned. I think followup.cc is better. You may also like Boomerang for Gmail. I wasn't happy with any of those those and wrote my own thing called Gmail Snooze which works without relying on a third-party service (like followupthen and followup.cc) nor cluttering the Gmail UI (like Boomerang). You just give threads integer labels ...


1

The answer is that the number of sprints you do is whatever is right for you. I don't approach the sprints in terms of sets. Rather, I start a Pomodoro sprint whenever I have a single task that needs my undivided attention. There are so many distractions that rob my attention when I am trying to accomplish something related to my "True Work". Email, social ...


1

I use my main email account and mail rules. However, I mostly subscribe to things I read. And I delete anything after a month if I haven't read it. So they don't pile up in search. Bulk emails tend not to be things I can't search for later on the internet.


1

Assuming you're using a reasonably modern email client that allows it, my recommendation is to keep all archived email in a single folder while tagging the messages to help find them when needed. Actually, in Outlook I use an archive folder per year, which lets me get it off the Exchange Server and onto a network file system, which my IT guys love me for. I ...


1

Whether you should or shouldn't get to inbox zero comes down to personal preferences. Some people prefer to make their bed every day, some never. Some people prefer brushing their teeth a three times daily, others once in a while. Some dust their house every day some, again, once in a while. It's about the process of keeping things flowing and not to have ...


1

I think you can give Google Docs a try. Google has been integrating it well into Gmail and other services very well lately and it is expected to get even better as time progresses.



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