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11

Can a good comfortable chair increase work hours and productivity? Of course. Why shouldn't ? Would it be good to invest a very good chair? If you spend a lot of time with your computer, you deserve the best chair for your productivity. I recomended you the best chair (In my opion) Herman Miller Aeron chair which I heard it from Jeff. It's ...


10

I think you choosed wrong bookstand for you. You need page keeping part in your bookstand. And some of them has changeable angle properties. Get a new one like this; And also when you read in your hand, you can use this book holder. It's brilliant.


9

Sitting straight all the time is harmful, you shouldn't be doing that! It's putting too much stress on your back. We humans are built to stand up most of the time and sitting in a chair is artificial for our bodies. You're slouching not because you forget to sit straight, but because your body tries to ease unnecessary tension. Please take a look at this ...


8

Can reading electronic displays be made more comfortable? There are successful attempts that have been made by implementing electronic paper devices, which bring the experience as close to paper as it could be. If you have the money for it, consider buying one of those devices. If, on the other hand, you want to read more comfortable on a computer ...


8

Basically, yes. If you currently feel your chair is uncomfortable, or your back hurts, that's definitely a good reason to change it. Being distracted by discomfort is never good for your productivity. However, if you think your chair is just fine right now, it still may be good to get a more ergonomic one. According to the doctors I've seen for my ...


8

As mentioned by other responders, it turns out that using a standing desk isn't necessarily a perfect solution. In this amazing article on Life Hacker about this topic, they mention the trade-offs being: It dramatically increases the risks of carotid atherosclerosis (ninefold) because of the additional load on the circulatory system, and it also ...


8

Buy a booktop desk stand, also known as desktop book holder. If you take one that attaches to the side of the desk, you can swing it in any direction: If you keep your book at the same distance from your eyes as your monitor, you avoid having to refocus your eyes (less eyestrain, less fatigue). Edited to add: and make sure the one you buy has a way to ...


8

The following works for me: Adjust the height / position of your monitor, chair and desk Consider the sources of light in the room (windows, lamps, etc) and make sure none of them are reflecting on your screen / keyboard Adjust font size to make reading comfortable Get a bigger screen Reduce monitor contrast / brightness Install and run f.lux Where you ...


7

I have a standing/sitting desk at work and really like it. As the other posters have mentioned, ensuring it is both standing and sitting is important, not only from a health perspective but because you'll likely get tired of standing at some point and need to sit down. I find that when I get my afternoon slump an hour or so after lunch, standing helps to ...


7

Devices with e-ink (or similar) displays are optimized for the reading experience. I have a Kobo, and love reading on that opposed to reading the same thing on the computer (or a glossy screen). Really, the Kobo screen looks almost just like paper, and is quite easy on the eyes. Plus it can display pretty much anything (as far as I've tried, anyway) if it is ...


7

You may consider going chairless, and set up a standing desk. The previous link describes the experience of someone who used one for one year, listing the advantages and drawbacks of her experience. I am personally trying this since a couple of weeks, mostly a positive experience for now, but I don't spend 8 hours in front of a desk every day. Also, ...


7

I personally feel comfortable only when I'm excited about what I'm doing. If I'm not excited about what I'm doing, I can have the best chair in the world and it won't do much for my productivity. Conclusion: emotions and motivation / mindset are the fuel of my productivity, not ergonomic chairs / monitors / etc. I don't think 'things' will help your ...


7

Bit of a lifehack solution this one... Take one jacket/shirt/cardigan... and your working chair, I'm using this one for demonstration purposes... Place the jacket/shirt/cardigan over the back of the chair like so... (So that the neck of the jacket/shirt/cardigan is where a chair user's neck might be. Now sit on the chair and place your arms ...


6

As of the term "ergonomic" it should be immediatly clear, that at least concerning mice and keyboards, the "improvement" is in the "health" (or the strain on it, e.g. RSI) of the user not on his or her productivity! As noted before, due to the sub-optimal keyboard layout these days, there's not much you can do. Especially considering that you might not ...


6

There are many apps and software programs that can give a reminder every now and then (e.g. schedulers, break timers, mindfullness or pomodoro apps). You can use any of these programs to regularly remind yourself to sit up straight. Put your watch on your other wrist. Every time you want to check the time and look at the wrong wrist you remind yourself to ...


5

Readability Redux Extension I've been using this Chrome extension for the past few days. It did help optimizing the yawning/paragraph ratio, so I decided it's a good idea to share it with you too. Fast and reliable Readability Redux is a simple tool that makes reading on the Web more enjoyable by removing the cluter around what you're reading. It can ...


5

I work at a standing desk 8-12 hours a day but walking on a treadmill. I have no chair. I find standing still very uncomfortable but walking about 2-2.5mph painless. Negatives: Probably wouldn't be approved in an office environment (I work at home), expensive if not a diy'er. Positives: Posture improving, no more neck or back pain, weight finally under ...


5

I use a trackball mouse controlled by thumb, so my experience may be different. Some benefits of a trackball mouse: More ergonomic: You only have to move your thumb, rather than your whole arm. More portable: You don't have to sacrifice the luxury of a good mouse, when you don't have space for a mouse pad. Easier to move the mouse great distances. ...


5

There is an element of truth in what @Tool says - the environment is not likely to be the key factor in making you productive. That said, it is certainly an enabler: you don't want your setup to hinder your work, and you also don't want it to make you lethargic. Mentally it is better to have your bed reserved for sleeping, and an office space for working - ...


5

@krammii gave good general advice. To be more specific on desktop ergonomics : Chair height : make sure your feet are resting on the floor ; you should be able to slide your hand under your thighs easily Desk height : arms as close to your body as possible (not extending to reach your keyboard), shoulders rested (take a deep breath), your forearm should ...


4

I have been through a lot of chairs and setups over the years. I first needed a special setup 20 years ago with a touch of RSI in the wrists. A drop-down keyboard tray fixed that but it taught some valuable lessons. Since then I've adopted the following practices: When there's a desk, a good solid keyboard tray is important like the ones from Versa. ...


4

I've recently taken to reading such things on my phone, instead of a computer. It's an Android phone with a fairly large screen, so reading information from websites is quite a comfortable experience. Similarly, there's a version of Adobe Reader for the phone which allows me to deal with PDFs. Anyway, it doesn't allow you to set a bookmark so that you can ...


4

I have the same problem; while I'm on the computer all day, I hate trying to actually read a book off of the screen. Reading an actual paperback, I can go for a few hours before my eyes get tired. Reading off of a Kindle, I can go indefinitely. I don't use my Kindle for technical material because I have the paperback size (actually, the first generation) ...


4

I remember seeing a great lifehack for this a while back, possibly on Reddit. It only requires duct tape. Step 1: In the morning, with no shirt on, stand up as straight as you can with perfect posture. Step 2: Get your roommate or significant other to put one piece of duct tape on your back across from one shoulder blade to the other. Step 3: Second ...


3

Maybe you should reevaluate if you really need a notepad. Generally, I find that would use pen/paper for two reasons: Quickly write down some text/numbers Do some quick and dirty UML modeling while coding (i.e. pictures with boxes and arrows) For (1) one I've completely switched over to using OneNote, so that solves the pen/paper problem. WinKey-N (or ...


3

Variety is worth a lot to me. For that reason I have several setups that I change positions throughout the day. Desktop setup in bed to allow working lying down. Monitors and keyboard positioned to reduce neck/wrist strain. Standard large corner table with office chair. Super relaxing but not ergonomically perfect chair Second chair to alternate ...


3

Dependencies here are personal preference and the types of tasks you do on the computer. Personally I find the combination between a trackpoint and a mouse to be perfect. For quick normal interactions with the GUI in between typing, the trackpoint takes away the need to move a hand to the mouse. For anything of longer duration, or more complex, the mouse is ...


3

One possible productivity gain for you may be to change the keyboard layout (rather than the physical keyboard) to the Dvorak layout. The Wikipedia article cites that there has been little in the way of scientific studies done recently to support the claims that the layout is more efficient, but there is a fairly vocal community of users who do swear by the ...


3

Three suggestions: - Use a notepad as a mouse pad. You can use any standard notebook or even just a pile of paper. If you want to be a little fancier, you can use a paper mousepad from Knock Knock. I did a quick profile check and see you're Canadian; you can find tons of these at Chapters/Indigo/Coles. - If you're only making small notes, just use a ...


3

I learned to touch type long enough ago that the device I learned on had a lever you pushed with the left hand to accomplish a carriage return. (i.e. manual typewriter). The finger map layout I learned and still use today (at 110wpm on a good day) is your second image. It isn't a new development. I don't believe there are any ergonomic benefits to EDX. ...



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