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8

Buy a booktop desk stand, also known as desktop book holder. If you take one that attaches to the side of the desk, you can swing it in any direction: If you keep your book at the same distance from your eyes as your monitor, you avoid having to refocus your eyes (less eyestrain, less fatigue). Edited to add: and make sure the one you buy has a way to ...


3

They make "standing desks" - or you can make your own. This helps with the standing part not the walking part. They also make treadmill standing desks, but they are expensive. In your case, it sounds like the treadmill is at the gym and not in your home. And for math, an audiobook probably wouldn't work. Do you have to use the treadmill? What about an ...


3

Glossy screens are terrible from an ergonomics perspective. In fact, they are illegal to use professionally in some jurisdictions. Why there is a public demand for glossy screens is one of mankind's mysteries. How you percieve the glare is subjective, so if sunglasses work for you, then use them. There are also special glasses that claim to reduce the ...


3

I learned to touch type long enough ago that the device I learned on had a lever you pushed with the left hand to accomplish a carriage return. (i.e. manual typewriter). The finger map layout I learned and still use today (at 110wpm on a good day) is your second image. It isn't a new development. I don't believe there are any ergonomic benefits to EDX. ...


2

Since reflected light will be polarized, your polarized sunglass solution may be quite effective depending on the direction of the light source. I would guess it is not damaging to your visual system, as long as you feel comfortable with it.


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Although this is old, here's a very cheap DIY alternative you could try: http://iamnotaprogrammer.com/Ikea-Standing-desk-for-22-dollars.html It's obviously not adjustable during use, but you can do what I do (if you have a wide enough desk) and switch between using it for the standing position or sitting down and using the actual desk for the sitting ...


2

TL;DR? When you're choosing tools: Try them for yourself rather than relying on the experience and theories of others. Choose long-term comfort over short-term increases productivity, especially where the increase in productivity is small. If you want to be confident of a productivity increase, don't just rely on subjective experience. Rather, use ...


2

If you have a tablet, take photos of the book and read them there on your tablet. I do it a lot. Not on the treadmill but on my way to university, because it is difficult to hold big books while walking. However, I can not study math deeply without a pen and paper to follow the formulas. If you have a laptop computer and a smartphone, it seems like a good ...


1

Swap the buttons. It takes 5 mouse clicks to toggle back and forth (Start, Control Panel, Mouse, Switch primary and secondary buttons, OK) which you'll learn to do very quickly. I mouse right at home, left at work, just to even out the usage. When I remote from home to my work machine, I switch the mouse buttons, and then back again before I log out. ...


1

My personal research has found most "comfortable" (ergonomically friendly) is better than simple change. Theory For a focused single example you specifically call out RSI as a condition you're attempting to avoid. I'll pick out preventing Carpal Tunnel which is a specific form or RSI common in programmers. Let's say over the coarse of 1 hour you move your ...


1

I was searching for a very long time to find a doctor that is specialiced on back back problems. He explained to me that you should alternate 'moving chairs' with 'regular chairs'. The exercise ball would be a 'moving chair' where you muscles (back and stomage muscles) are trained. And with a 'regular chair' your muscles are lees needed. The trick is to ...


1

How many pages do you realistically think you will read through in a half an hour to an hour of treadmill time. 20? 50? My experience is that I am lucky to absorb five or ten pages of advanced material. If it is that low of a number I would either make photocopies or print out a few pages of a PDF copy and take the five or ten pieces of paper with you to ...


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Great feedback on this question! One thing I've used quite a bit is a desk that allows me to stand up while I work (I use a "geekdesk" but there are many varities) - keeps my posture pretty good and definitely keeps my energy up all day.


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I prefer to use computer in corner between three tables and rotating chair so I have table space on both sides and shelves above. Who needs windows if you can have computer cave?


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If you use a computer desk with a sliding keyboard drawer, use that drawer/shelf for your book while the desktop for your keyboard. This way, you have the least amount of interference and have both access to all three things (keyboard, screen and book) at the same time.


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Take a look at the products from Gunnar Optiks. They're not cheap (+$100) and they're not a panacea, but I know they help me tremendously in a typical office building with horrible fluorescent lights, cold dry air and bright glossy Apple monitors. My eyes just don't feel as tired after a day in the office, and the difference is stark when I take them off, ...


1

I think your eyes won't say you thank you for that. There are many other ways to improve visibility of glossy screen. Here's what I'm using: solarized - color scheme, mathematically computed to be perfect for your eyes. Supports various terminals, editors, ides f.lux - application, that changes glow of screen at dark times :). Improves readability of the ...


1

I had a similar situation at one point, and discovered that the discomfort I perceived as glare from the screen was actually caused by bright florescent overhead lighting located in just the wrong place. I solved the problem by wearing a hat with a brim or a visor, like an old time accountant's eyeshade.



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