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14

Evernote Advantages: There is a free option that will be good enough for many people. Lightning fast search. Searches as you type, instead of having to press enter. This is highly preferable. Good for loose, relatively unconnected ideas that you want to be able to access easily in the future. Great for keeping a journal. It can never be lost, it ...


13

Personally, the weekly review is what brings all that together. Realistically, you are not going to work on every next action in one week. So just have a list of what next actions you are going to work on and the context in which you will do them. Then at your next weekly review, sort back those actions you completed to the projects they were for. ...


9

You can use both at the same time in an integrated manner. Evernote to RTM integration was something RTM users are always demanding. When evernote added a 'note link' feature in mid-June, the integration became a possibility. Here is how it works: Add the reference material (that you intend to put in a RTM task) in an EN note. This material can be text, ...


9

So we start on the same page, next actions should be grouped by context, not project: @office versus European vacation. If you're having trouble remembering what project a given action is associated with (although I would think in most cases it would be obvious), then include the project title in the task description. For example: Europe vaca: email Mika ...


9

I am a Google power user since 2001, but I have become disgruntled with the company due to its service cancellation policies. Many applications I have poured data into have been discontinued. Given the recent cancellation of Google Reader, there is a high risk that Google won't keep Keep (pardon the pun). So evidently I recommend Evernote: James Fallows: ...


8

I agree that the weekly review is a good place to tie things together but in many cases I can accomplish several steps of a project between each review, if I just remember them. What I have found useful for this is the Cascading Next Actions described here. Basically, it is just tacking on a "in order to…" or similar phrase to the end of your Next Action, ...


7

I've just (this morning) run across The Secret Weapon, a site giving a very detailed description of implementing GTD in Evernote. On a quick skim through their manifesto, this looks like a very well thought out and practical approach, based primarily on the tagging available in Evernote. I'm going to take a much closer look, and consider adjusting my system ...


6

Evernote does support notebook stacks, at least on all the platforms I use (iOS, Android, Windows). That provides one additional layer of hierarchy. I've found (like Chris in the post comment) that tags are more powerful. The stumbling block I had to overcome was not using enough tags. One tag on a note isn't enough! Lots of tags, with a little thought ...


5

You can use the script described here. Just add labels to the message in Gmail, and, in the background, the script will forward the message to a note in Evernote, to any notebook of your choice and with the assigned labels as tags. In GMail, you can easily add labels to many messages at once, and this script will forward them to Evernote. However, there is ...


5

There's are a few aspects of your question that need additional clarification, for example; what OS does your server have, and you want notes to sync - but with what ? I personally believe that Microsoft OneNote is a great solution to your needs. There's a OneNote client for just about every desktop and mobile OS out there. Also, if you store your OneNote ...


4

Google keep is only Android and web, as far as I know. Evernote has native applications for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, and a very nice web application. I use multiple devices with different operating systems, I appreciate my productivity applications being available on all of them. Evernote has a web clipper and a browser addon (Clearly) that do a very ...


3

I use DevonThink extensively on my Mac because I need a highly-structured way to organize my notes. It is very powerful and reliable software. Their iOS app, DevonThink to Go, is fairly new and still may need some ironing out, but it may be worth considering now if you just need a mobile solution and aren't dependent yet on sync.


3

The wikipedia page I'm looking at (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Getting_Things_Done says Evernote (among many others) is "designed or useful" for a GTD implementation. I think that is entirely accurate. Evernote is an essential part of my GTD practice. I use it for project list, project support notes, and reference material. My Next Action context lists ...


3

Well, there's a plethora of articles on the Internet, if you try searching for them. I tried to implement Evernoote some time ago for task management but didn't find it fitting my workflow. The tutorial I used was "Getting Things Done (GTD) in Evernote with Only One Notebook" from 40Tech. The basic approach is to use a deep tree structure of tags instead of ...


3

I think voice notes and text notes serve different purposes; they are useful in different situations. Text notes are what I prefer for simple facts I need to remember, when it's clear what the information is, and how I want to preserve it. For example "don't forget to buy eggs" or "remember to email George about the report" aren't things I would put in a ...


3

I prefer to use tags. Tags can indicate any number of things: 1. What project(s) the task applies to 2. What the status of it is (I distinguish "Action" from "Next Action") 3. What the priority / context / energy level etc. is for this item Each item can have many tags and I think most organization systems have tags (I use labels in gmail for example) ...


2

I have tried to set this up in RTM. The way I did it is by making projects as tags. Then, when I create the actions, I add the project tag to it. I then have smart lists that look for tags starting from particular prefix (w1- for work p1- for home) plus NA (Next Action) tag and show them as work or home lists correspondingly. I already create a description ...


2

Check this out http://everdo.it For all GTD and Evernote fans! The EverDo.it application will be available for iOS and Android. This tool will not only enable full synchronization with personalized content of Evernote, but will also allow the user to create personal tasks and to do list independently. EverDo.it is based on the philosophy of Getting Things ...


2

I use Evernote for GTD. Evernote has only a limited concept of time, so scheduling actions for a future date less than ideal. There is no auto reminder system--not essential for GTD but a definite bonus electronic devices can give us. For time based and recurring events with reminders, an additional program/service would be best employed. I use email as my ...


2

Do your tags have structure? Start organizing tags into a tag tree to get some structure. Consider all tags that you currently have as level 1 tags. Then organize all of your 400+ level 1 tags into some 30-100 level 2 tags. Do it bottom up, not top down: that is, do not make a list of level 2 tags and then fill them up, but just start grouping level 1 tags ...


2

(adding this here as a note to myself) Try the Org mode for Emacs , if you combine it with the MobileOrg you can create and sync notes across android , iOS and any desktop OS that can run Emacs all the while backing the notes file to your choice of "cloud" based service. Its not as polished as Evernote or DevonThink but this is a great open source ...


2

An interesting open source alternative to Evernote is in my opinion TagSpaces. It is basically a simple file manager with note editing and tagging capabilities. There are releases for windows, mac and linux. Interesting by this project is that the tags are saved in the file names making syncing it easy with for example dropbox.


2

My experience (and that of a lot of GTD users on several mailing lists I've been on) is that while implementing GTD can and does have an immediate payoff, it takes a couple of years on average to fully understand and internalize how to make it work for you. Using a system for "some weeks" is probably not enough to give it a fair trial. Unless there's ...


2

You could create a note for each assignment and change the tags from "#pending" to "#done", leaving them in the same notebook. Smart searches would then let you get the list of #pending assignments. I don't see that as much different than moving between notebooks, but you might. If you don't want to create a separate note for each assignment, and you must ...


2

You can use tags or notebooks to divide up what content you want to review. Once it's reviewed, ask yourself "will I ever need to reference this?" - if the answer is "no" delete it. I usually only save often referenced material or material that is hard to find if I lose the source. To expand on this. Say I have a few projects - writing a book, fishkeeping ...


2

TL;DR: Don't use Evernote as a to-do tool. I find Evernote to be a great place for reference material, but not for actual to-do lists that frequently change. For that, I use a mix of two other tools instead: workflowy.com is the most fantastic outliner I've ever seen. It's minimalistic in appearance but packs the perfect amount of functionality in a very ...


1

If you are using MacOS, I would suggest checking out DevonThink Pro. http://www.devontechnologies.com It has the features of Evernote that I like which you can see from the link above. Most notably storage of multiple formats, keyword tagging, and fast search capabilities.


1

Now that you have collected all this stuff, you have to organize it. A very popular method for organizing your stuff is to process each item using the GTD Workflow. Quoting from the book "Getting Things Done" by David Allen, he states that processing is "...identifying each item and deciding what it is, what it means and what you're going to do with it." ...


1

IQTELL runs for about a year now (we're in beta) a fully integrated GTD solution that combines Evernote with actions, projects, emails, calendars, contact, bookmarks and more. Through the app, you're able to manage your entire workflow including the weekly review in on place. To apply to our beta you need to register on our site and answer an email.


1

Potential workaround is, if you use Firefox, to use the Firefox extension for oneNote -http://www.labnol.org/software/organize/send-to-onenote-firefox-extension-save-web-pages/3781/ I'm an Evernote user, but I suspect this might be a easier workflow at the cost (potentially) of some productivity...



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