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8

It's hard to work on a big goal all the time. You don't have anything until you reach the final goal. There is a talk by Ray Bradbury, which may be of help. What's important for you there is this: The problem with novels is that you can spend a whole year writing one and it might not turn out well because you haven’t learned to write yet. But the best ...


7

What components of yourself do you consider uncharismatic? Break it down into specific components that you have to improve or habits you want to develop. Some example goals: Walk naturally with proper posture. Smile when on the phone and typing replies. Avoid defensive gestures like crossing arms, putting hands in pocket, or covering the crotch. Say hello ...


5

How to manage the spilled task within deadline? It's easy. You move it. Seriously, if the interruptions are happening at such scale that you can't keep up with your original plan, that means that either your original planning was too ambitious or you are not handling interruptions properly. Assuming that you do your best, it condenses to a plan. Now, ...


3

Never plan 100%. If you have 8 hours/day available to do the work, plan only 6. This way you have 25% 'slack time'. You are actually planning the interruptions. Is 25% enough? Measure how much extra time you need now, or how much of the work you don't do, and after a few weeks you will have a pretty good estimate of the percentage you can plan in.


2

This really depends on the types of goals you're setting. For short term, simple goals I just add them to an electronic to-do list that I have got into the habit of checking every time I get back from work and at weekends. I also have a list of repeat tasks - things like taking the rubbish out on sunday night, cleaning out the fridge, organising the bills. ...


2

The majority of these situations can be solved by a mixture of planning, note taking and habit forming. If it is something you do regularly: This is where habit forming can be useful - you will need to start off consciously doing something every time but then it will become automatic. It helps if you always have a specific mental cue that triggers the ...


2

My strategy: Never set a goal you don't mean to achieve. If you think you can run 5k in 25 min in 2 months, don't aim for 24 min just to be ambitious, aim for 25 and let anything more be an overachievement. I do this to avoid dreaming, which is always a hazard when setting goals. Always set concrete goals, even if the intention isn't very concrete. If you ...


2

It would depend on which core values are not in alignment. If the company violates your personal standards of decency I would get out ASAP. Look for another company in the industry where you can at least get by. If your core values are OK, but you are seeking a new field or a new industry, I can understand that obligations may exist where you need to be ...


2

Sounds like you know what you want (this is good!), but not how to get what you want. You apparently have lack of free time after work. This may be an excuse (caused by your laziness perhaps?). I lump procrastination and laziness together; you become lazy because you procrastinate, and procrastinate because you become lazy. It's a vicious cycle. ...


2

There is a book by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi about the flow state where he reccommend setting the optimal complexity level of goals so they are not too high, but also not too low. Then you increase your ambitions proportional to the increase of your abilities and keep motivaated enough this way. I've read that really achieving the goals you set increases your ...


1

How about something simple like a text or spredsheet document, a note in Evernote, a page in your private wiki or something like that. Something you can easily access and easily edit. I sometimes use the three daily outcomes and the three weekly outcomes at work. For daily outcomes I use a TODO item (task) that is scheduled today and contains the three ...


1

While working towards a goal (the "prospective setting" in this paper's jargon), more distant goals' expected time to completion are more strongly underestimated. Thus, compared to overly ambitious long-term goals, overly ambitious short-term goals aren't so upsetting when they end up taking longer than expected. http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/000712699161459


1

In my experience "laziness" and "procrastination" are code for something else -- exhaustion, feeling overwhelmed, whatever, and addressing whatever that is is probably your best first step. Maybe you actually have too little free time to do much more than eat and sleep. Maybe you have no idea how to get started. Maybe something else. Beating yourself up ...


1

I suggest you start with what GTD calls 'natural planning'. You write down ANYTHING you think you need to do/learn to achieve your goal. Don't try to organise this at all yet. Don't sort the list, don't think about who might be involved or responsible yet. After that, you will find you can group the objectives into bigger blocks. You will structure the plan ...


1

(Edit: This answer might in part answer your other question, too, btw) I think every (learning) goal should be broken down into many much smaller goals. Let's say I want to learn mathematics (I do, so that'll be my example :p). This is how I would approach it (roughly): 1.Set a clear overall goal, keeping the S.M.A.R.T.-criteria in mind: I will be able ...


1

Splitting your goal in monthly, weekly and finally daily steps is a good plan. A pretty good work pattern which I heard of is the three way pattern: The first day you prepare what you want to get done. You prepare everything that you need to get your work right and good including everything that makes you feel good and that is necessary for your work. ...


1

What I'm missing in your long-time strategy is "planning from the future": I want to achieve goal F on date Z In order to reach Z I need to achieve goal E on date Y (< Z) In order to reach Y I need to achieve goal D on date X (< Y) ........ I need to do A tomorrow. This gives you waypoints to check (so you can't get away with not measuring) and if ...


1

It looks like you answered part of the question yourself actually. You said yourself, "In retrospect, the first goal had enough hype to generate the energy to achieve the stretch that it required. There wasn't enough energy remaining for the following goals." In doing so, you identified a weakness in your framework: it doesn't make room for motivation. Goal ...


1

I don't think you know what your goals are - I don't say this with disrespect, but rather to help you. What are your goals. S.M.A.R.T. goals? Objective: physical wellness Goals: x minutes running, y calories taken These goals and systems are just part of the physical wellness. Physical wellness can't be achieved, it's not like you say "I ran x minutes, ...


1

Goals and Systems are just constructs to help you identify what you want to aim for, and steps to take to get there. Your question on whether you should work on systems or goals is a very personal one. It sounds like you are having difficulty at breaking longer term goals down into bite size chunks. Financial Independence can be a very long term goal. ...



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