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Great question! I have used a few different tools (achieve planner, etc.) which can be complex but effective. (Anthony Robbins, Steven Covey, Jim Rohn, GTD) All great sources. What I have used to be highly effective is to "begin with the end in mind" but break it down into specifically measurable sub-goals or mile markers. And what works well for me is to ...


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While working towards a goal (the "prospective setting" in this paper's jargon), more distant goals' expected time to completion are more strongly underestimated. Thus, compared to overly ambitious long-term goals, overly ambitious short-term goals aren't so upsetting when they end up taking longer than expected. http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/000712699161459


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Where we are(% in progress) [...] How far(in days) will it take to complete While you can surely get some numbers to show that, for most of the longer-term goals they will be rather arbitrary. Have you seen those progress bars, where it takes 5 seconds to reach 90%, and then 5 minutes to go through the final 10%? Same story. What would be more helpful, ...


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My strategy: Never set a goal you don't mean to achieve. If you think you can run 5k in 25 min in 2 months, don't aim for 24 min just to be ambitious, aim for 25 and let anything more be an overachievement. I do this to avoid dreaming, which is always a hazard when setting goals. Always set concrete goals, even if the intention isn't very concrete. If you ...


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I don't have any research to back this up, but by personal experience is that one should never decide on goals that you don't commit 100% to. If you set a goal you should reach it. Otherwise the goal-setting is more or less just masturbation to your fantasies. Thus, start out small, make a habit of always fullfilling your goals, then you can start setting ...


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No specific research links, but the simple answer is that yes, all goals, short- or long-term, should be ambitious. The question is around what ambitious means to you. Do you work best with small step goals, or do you like to be challenged hard? do you work best with all long term milestones broken down into daily goals, or do you like a couple of big ...


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This really depends on the types of goals you're setting. For short term, simple goals I just add them to an electronic to-do list that I have got into the habit of checking every time I get back from work and at weekends. I also have a list of repeat tasks - things like taking the rubbish out on sunday night, cleaning out the fridge, organising the bills. ...


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Splitting your goal in monthly, weekly and finally daily steps is a good plan. A pretty good work pattern which I heard of is the three way pattern: The first day you prepare what you want to get done. You prepare everything that you need to get your work right and good including everything that makes you feel good and that is necessary for your work. ...


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It's hard to work on a big goal all the time. You don't have anything until you reach the final goal. There is a talk by Ray Bradbury, which may be of help. What's important for you there is this: The problem with novels is that you can spend a whole year writing one and it might not turn out well because you haven’t learned to write yet. But the best ...


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I don't understand why Scott Adams differentiates between Goals and Systems. They are two sides of the same coin. David Allen quotes a church in Sussex England, “A vision without a task is but a dream, a task without a vision is drudgery, a vision and a task is the hope of the world”. This is a great quote but it does leave out the system. The system is ...


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What I'm missing in your long-time strategy is "planning from the future": I want to achieve goal F on date Z In order to reach Z I need to achieve goal E on date Y (< Z) In order to reach Y I need to achieve goal D on date X (< Y) ........ I need to do A tomorrow. This gives you waypoints to check (so you can't get away with not measuring) and if ...


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It looks like you answered part of the question yourself actually. You said yourself, "In retrospect, the first goal had enough hype to generate the energy to achieve the stretch that it required. There wasn't enough energy remaining for the following goals." In doing so, you identified a weakness in your framework: it doesn't make room for motivation. Goal ...



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