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It seems natural to me to look at any day-relevant items on my lists at the beginning of the day. These include deadlines, start dates, and appointments. Knowing what contexts (eg, locations) you will have available to you on a day may occasion a review of tasks specific to the contexts. I usually mark the tasks that seem to me particularly worth keeping on ...


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For your habitual task when captured, clarified and organized you will realise that it's not a one time action but a repeatable action, for which you will need to set a repetabel habitual structure for yourself such that the habitual task in consideration is taken care, and it can be reviewed later say during the week review or daily review. Many people, ...


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If you have a new idea, or are given new work to do, that goes in your inbox to be processed in due course, regardless of when it happens. This is what GTDers mean by "Ubiquitous capture". The weekly review is not caused by any input; it's just setting aside a moment to go over everything, This is mainly to be sure that you haven't missed anything, but also ...


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From the spec it looks like the only markers that are defined are @ for "context" and + for "project." Context has a specific meaning in GTD but can be expanded and adapted (abused?) with a minimum of fuss later by namespacing the markers. Perhaps all "areas of focus" could begin with @af- like @af-spirituality or @af-family. Time horizons could be ...


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Wanting to stop a habit is core critical. Then simply letting the habit go. Just stop the habit. At some point we picked it up, yes? Now we decide we don't want the habit, and what is easier than just putting it down? Physically, some habits may require some degree of a period of short discomfort. So What? Life hurts anyway so much of the time, so suck it ...


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Robert Byrne's answer hints to it: David Allen's approach to prioritisation is reviewing your Horizons of Focus.


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There's a little problem with the way the question is worded... it presupposes an answer that belongs to the same category of solutions as GTD. GTD is a collection of practices that work well when used in concert with each other. Presumably, it's the system David Allen (the author) uses. However, the reality is that many people don't use all his practices. ...


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In my work, I have explored the transition that one must make from one technique to another in order to deal with a greater number of self-imposed tasks (which I call time demands.) It appears that you have reached the limit of what GTD (as a set of practices) can handle. It's extremely helpful for someone who realizes that a single To-Do List won't work ...



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