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The way I manage content lists, personally, is to keep them in more than one place. For instance, I mostly use Evernote, so my book list is in Evernote, but also in GoodReads. For the sake of discussion, GTD is mainly about getting everything out of your head so you can focus on the task at hand rather than trying to remember other things. There's no ...


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I would say yes. Do short tasks during the weekly review. You should ideally do all 2 minute tasks during the Process stage if your following GTD to the letter not during the review stage. That said the 2 minute rule is a fundamental of GTD so I'd probably extend this to the review stage if you find your still left with tasks. Here are my tips for things ...


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Yes! God yes! The two minute rule applies during weekly review. if you are disciplined enough to perform a weekly review, chances are there is a sizable inventory of stuff and projects that need reviewing. A weekly review takes about one or two hours giving you time enough to review about 50 to 100 things right? If you let execution of tasks leak over the ...


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The Now Goals concept by Michael Linenberger The Concept of "Now Goals" by Michael Linenberger is composed of 2 key parts: "vision goals" = defining your goals in a way that you can connect with them emotionally and are inspired to achieve them, practically that means writing a short "goal statement" for each goal (details see below) "goal spinning" = ...


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I usually do them. From my perspective clearing the inbox is clearing the inbox, whether it's regular daily processing or the first step in a weekly review.


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I personally do finish short tasks that I come across during the weekly review immediately. Because, as you say, transferring them to a Next Action list probably takes more time than just doing them. Of course, there really shouldn't be any short tasks to deal with during the weekly review, since we should already have done all those tasks when they first ...


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You may wish to consider wuudo - https://wuudo.com/ You can create hierarchical lists on the left to organize your tasks & represent your different horizons or views (50k, 40k etc). You can drag and drop your tasks between the lists that represent your horizons to keep things organized and set priorities, statuses, types, reminders etc for your tasks. ...


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One app that will work well for this, but might have a bit of a learning curve, is http://gingkoapp.com . It has a GTD template you can use, but it's extremely flexible. It's a tree-based editor, so the different levels of the tree can naturally represent the different horizons. Disclaimer: I'm the founder :)


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The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People contains a section (or chapter, or multiple sections, I forget) about the process of defining one's high-level goals and vision. There are some exercises therein, one specifically about imagining yourself at your own funeral, thinking about what you want to be said of you and your life, and using that to focus in ...


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Right. Will try to add to @Dennis S' answer. Mails: Utilize rules. Make few basic rules that move mails to designated folders automatically. This way you will have better overview. Example folders: "Projects", "Meetings", "External", "Administrative" and so on... Create a "Stash" folder where you will keep uncategorised messages that have some value. Move ...


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Automate Accelerate Delegate Delete Automate The first thing to do is make sure you are taking advantage of automation as much as you can. Your email can be sorted automatically into different folders, allowing you to choose which ones you don't need to look at now. Mailing list subscriptions, for example. You can also automate, at least partially, how ...



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