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11

From common sense, a non-smoker has more time (no need for smoking breaks), 1 less distraction when trying to work on something (the distraction of wanting to smoke), and 1 less item on their to-do list (buy more cigarettes) There is the fitness/health aspect as well; people consider it part of productivity to run/workout (etc.), and smoking can hinder ...


8

The following works for me: Adjust the height / position of your monitor, chair and desk Consider the sources of light in the room (windows, lamps, etc) and make sure none of them are reflecting on your screen / keyboard Adjust font size to make reading comfortable Get a bigger screen Reduce monitor contrast / brightness Install and run f.lux Where you ...


8

At an absolutely base level you will be more productive alive than dead, and smoking is a major factor in increasing mortality (just look at the loading applied to smokers seeking life insurance quotes). Even if it hasn't killed you, there have been a few studies that have demonstrated higher than average levels of absenteeism for employees who smoke versus ...


7

You may consider going chairless, and set up a standing desk. The previous link describes the experience of someone who used one for one year, listing the advantages and drawbacks of her experience. I am personally trying this since a couple of weeks, mostly a positive experience for now, but I don't spend 8 hours in front of a desk every day. Also, ...


6

Unless it's a foundational library building project, I think writing perfect code is not fruitful. Since you are asking the question here, you surely agree with me on this. I used to struggle with similar symptoms. I do have perfectionism, and I love fast yet general code, but at the same time I acknowledge leaky abstraction and the evil premature ...


6

A partial solution is always better than no solution. If you want to change yourself, focus on congratulating yourself for partial success instead of punishing yourself for incomplete success; then the success will grow. Let me re-frame it this way: You already have a solution that works (wrapping your fingers), and that's great! Honestly; it's an ...


5

The most important effect to be aware of is oxygen toxicity. Courtesy of Wikipedia: Oxygen toxicity is a condition resulting from the harmful effects of breathing molecular oxygen (O2) at elevated partial pressures. It is also known as oxygen toxicity syndrome, oxygen intoxication, and oxygen poisoning . . . Severe cases can result in cell damage and ...


5

I've been doing polyphasic sleeping for almost one year (Everyman with two naps, but I am thinking about switching to biphasic sleeping since it seems more natural). Here is what you could do (supposing you want to try the "standard" biphasic with 6-hours core sleep and one 20-minutes day nap): Know your the length of your own sleep cycle. 1.1 Take a ...


5

When it comes to Polyphasic sleep I know of no better reference than my favorite alternative lifestyle guy, Steve Pavlina. He tried a VERY extensive polyphasic sleep experiment a few years back and I am still itching to try it due to the success he had but life around me is not working that way. You can see/learn everything you need to know about it here: ...


5

I don't think there are any studies relating directly to productivity. However, there are strong, long-known and well-documented health benefits connected to frequently varying your working position. Sitting for long periods of time has been shown to increase the risk of health problems, including heart diseases and diabetes. There is no research on how ...


5

@krammii gave good general advice. To be more specific on desktop ergonomics : Chair height : make sure your feet are resting on the floor ; you should be able to slide your hand under your thighs easily Desk height : arms as close to your body as possible (not extending to reach your keyboard), shoulders rested (take a deep breath), your forearm should ...


4

Here is some information from UCLA No one will stand all day when they have the opportunity to sit. This is because the body works harder when standing than when sitting. However, work production studies indicate that workers are more efficient when they stand to work. Jobs that are most appropriately done standing include construction workers, highway ...


4

You are not sleeping 'late' - many consider 8 hours to be appropriate for the majority of the human race. It would be late if you we sleeping from midnight to midday...You are only time-shifted. So as regards your question on detoxing - it is irrelevant. If you want to sleep from midnight to 8am, this becomes a relatively simple problem of managing your ...


4

I have been through a lot of chairs and setups over the years. I first needed a special setup 20 years ago with a touch of RSI in the wrists. A drop-down keyboard tray fixed that but it taught some valuable lessons. Since then I've adopted the following practices: When there's a desk, a good solid keyboard tray is important like the ones from Versa. ...


3

Variety is worth a lot to me. For that reason I have several setups that I change positions throughout the day. Desktop setup in bed to allow working lying down. Monitors and keyboard positioned to reduce neck/wrist strain. Standard large corner table with office chair. Super relaxing but not ergonomically perfect chair Second chair to alternate ...


3

Well, a heart attack or diabetes might be a good motivator, but they often take a lot of time to achieve. Since the knowledge of living an unhealthy lifestyle isn't a strong enough motivator for you, perhaps a practical change to your schedule might help. Take and eat a snack while you are commuting (something not messy or smelly, which won't offend or ...


3

You mention that you have a long commute. How long? Do you commute by car, train, bus? Is it possible for you to work exercise into your commute? For instance, some places have park and ride, could you ride a bicycle to such a place, then commute the rest of the way by train or bus? You also mention that by the time you are home you are "so hungry I ...


3

I'm not convinced this is personal productivity, but here's a hack to help: in my experience, I build up a static charge when walking around, not while seated at my desk. To avoid the pain of the static discharge hold something metal (a key, for example) in your hand while walking around, and touch grounding objects with the key. The static charge will ...


2

If you are being productive when concentrating you may find your simplest option is just to replace biting with another less annoying activity. So as before, use a temporary solution such as a bad testing product - not just for a month, but for a good length of time, like three months. During this time deliberately carry out some other activity - I ...


2

The problem with energy drinks is that they are usually loaded with high sugar content. That gives you a short boost of stimulation followed by a crash. An alternative to energy drinks would be taking the vitamins or herbal supplements directly: i.e. Caffeine pills, Complex B vitamins or Ginseng supplements. I have noticed a mental focus boost from doing it ...


2

A BMJ Open study suggests downtime should be kept below three hours per day, at least if your goal is to extend your lifetime. What it means for productivity is unclear, but generally speaking the consensus seems to be that standing up is much better than sitting, especially if you have a weight problem.


2

I too had this habit until I was 34 years old. I used to chew my little finger so bad that it had a permanent crack and callous on top. I became self-conscious about people seeing the finger so decided to do something about it. I realised that the pleasure I got was from the actual chewing motion so I started to chew my jaw instead (as though I had ...


2

I have recently started using a polyphasic sleep schedule (6 hour core sleep with a 20 min nap). To do this, I basically just started taking a nap in the middle of the day when I was able and then going to bed later. After a few days of this, I found that I wanted to go to bed for my core sleep earlier rather than later and so I allowed myself to do that, ...


2

Option 1: Parallelize tasks Can you program while travelling between cities? In the inability to reduce travel time, I would check if it is possible to do a task in parallel. I myself program, so I realize programming while travelling has the following issues: battery life (bring your charger to work, charge your laptop there) coding offline is more ...


1

I am a programmer, I work for others and I have my own products, too. I think you are passionate about programming, so the other problems can be easily solved. I recommend you to follow SDLC (software development life cycle) if your project is not too small. Never start coding right away without a crystal clear understanding of the overall system and what ...


1

Another possibility is to reduce the scope of the project. Pare the project down to the absolute bare essentials and build that. Remove any embellishment, and bells and whistles and instead concentrate on the core. That way you end up with something simple and elegant - the kind of thing you're trying to achieve by rewriting and restructuring.


1

You believe that you may suffer from Obsessive compulsive disorder. It is best treated with Cognitive behavioral therapy. In your case, it means subjecting you to the anxiety that results from not rewriting your code. Start with something small, then leave larger parts of your code as is. In this way, you learn that you don’t need the rewriting ritual to get ...


1

I did this for quite a while last year and what I found that an alarm was almost always needed....otherwise I worried about oversleeping while I slept, which made it less deep. I forget the brand (and am not at home) but it was a huge help to get an alarm that gradually lights up my room and plays natural sounds as it does so. Such a better way to wake up ...


1

The only way to improve in anything is to do it until you reach the point of fatigue, but not exhaustion. As a trainer told me, run until you're too tired to sing, but not too tired to talk. Then stop. This applies to just about every learning process out there. Never do it until you're burnt out, but push yourself until it hurts a little. After a while, ...


1

You can certainly exhaust yourself when up against a frustratingly difficult problem. A generally accepted tactic is to step away from the problem and go for a walk or do something else entirely unrelated to the problem. This often allows your brain to find other ways to get around the block.



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