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31

Text files are future proof. They will always work. Grep is your friend. See also TODO.txt. ASCII is the new PDF! - Cory Doctorow


22

Like first post said, the only future-proof technology is the ASCII (or UTF-8) text file. However, you will soon find yourself wanting more. Amongst many others, I have made substantial use of the following knowledgebase systems. Presenting in chronological order of when I started using it and how much I've written in it: Freemind (200,000+ words): ...


11

I started building a while ago a personal knowledge base (kb) with similiar requirements and concerns as yours. After considering a lot of different choices, finally settled with a mediawiki installation and haven't regretted since. I'll fundament my choice considering your requirements. future-proof In my point of view, building and practical, ...


7

Since text is a popular answer for this question, I would suggest Emacs, with Org-Mode. It also uses plain text as it's backend but has a lot of features. Links, tags, todo lists, time tracking, tables, basic spreadsheets, publishing/exporting to html and or pdf and support for referencing and embedding source code. Synchronyzing Org-Mode's text files with ...


6

There are 2 ways to do this: choose a solution that will last forever accept that you will need to do a conversion every 5-10 years The first will probably have a much lower functionality than the second. Choose a solution that works best for you now. Make sure that it has "export information" functionality, that you can use when converting to next ...


6

Emacs org-mode is probably the way to go. It's everything and the kitchen sink, including: Stores all data in 100% future-proof plain text files Allows easy manipulation, linking, and sorting of text. Emacs is cross-platform, so put your org files in a dropbox folder and work on them everywhere. Runs locally, so you don't need a server running php as with ...


6

I see the key sentence is this: I have trouble focusing. You like learning. That's clear. But I'll bet the list of things you're truly passionate about is a lot shorter than you probably think. What one thing would give you the most regret not having accomplished if you were on your deathbed? Read 70 books on that. Make sure that you make time every ...


5

Limit your choices. You probably have developed lots of practices to succesfully deal with your way of 'scattered' working, but one is missing: cleaning out old stuff. Go through those bookmarks, and if you don't immediately recognize them (don't follow them!): delete. Another one: set time limits. You have 5 minutes to pick a gardening book. Period. It ...


4

Simplicity Rules. If you take too much time to explain your system, then it will take you even more time to implement it. At some point in time, the tagging/sorting/archiving activity will stop you from using it. Tools and software are great. Beware obsolescence! Hierarchical folders still rule the day. If you have a Mac setting, finder could help you ...


4

Wikinews is surprisingly solid - the nature of the editing process means that anything that can't be absolutely defended is scrapped... Otherwise I use the BBC.


4

If your technically inclined take a look at Fossil It is a single executible that provides a Wiki as well as source code control. While you may not need to manage source code you can use the source control aspect of the program to help organize electronic documents and electronic reference meterial. Backing up is simple since the repository is a single ...


4

I have to say I have been using Streak: http://streak.com for tons of things now. Although it may appear more focused towards Sales the whole Box and Pipeline idea it has is actually applicable to many things. For TODO's I just send myself emails and put them in a Box and then assign it to a Pipeline. It actually sort of makes you Kanban-ish. There is ...


3

I highly recommend Workflowy.com. It's a web service that is essentially a single page that contains a list of text items. The thing is that the list can be of unlimited depth (it can contain tens of thousands of text items and more). So you can literally outline your whole life there, starting with big sections (projects, thoughts, knowledge base etc.) and ...


3

Evernote is future proof when it comes to text/images. You can export the data into html or xml. If Evernote gets replaced by a better tool someone will write a parser to convert the Evernote data into the new format.


3

I would choose either google alerts or yahoo pipes and then just set up the kind of news you are searching for via keywords and search operators. In your case you should use the minus operator a lot to rule out commentarys, yellow press etc. Take a look at other possible operators http://www.googleguide.com/advanced_operators_reference.html Yahoo ...


3

Are you married to Twitter? If not, Google Alerts might do nicely. It's fairly low-noise.


3

I would like to second @mgois's interest in MediaWiki. What is more future-proof than WikiPedia? But for me, MediaWiki is just a sophisticated front-end for MySQL, and it's more advanced fork, MariaDB. It takes a bit of work to get up to speed with SQL, but once you do, it's pretty amazing. I have 2GB worth of email, dating back to 1992, archived and ...


3

imho, any file manager which supports tags would work for you (any document would have one or more tags, allowing to attach this document to one or more tasks, contexts etc) look at Tabbles (and alternatives)


3

Is there anything else, specifically, that are you looking for (for example, a timer or an alarm system that tells you what to do)? I think that there are existing softwares that cover you. If you use Notepad++, the Explorer Plugin shows your filesystem. This gives you a filesystem view, so you can be organized by just following a good filesystem ...


2

I've been using Evernote for a long time (20,000+ items now stored in 50+ .enb files) but never upgraded past the v2.2 version because lots of my stuff isn't appropriate for the cloud, plus they never IMO got hierarchical tagging right with the cloud-based versions. The backend storage is standard XML, and there is a flexible export facility, the 2.2 ...


2

I've used JAM software's Filelist.exe tool for this. See below for command line usage. You can: Scan network drives Create a catalog of all directories and subdirectories, and all files, or filter for files of multiple selected types (eg /filter *.doc?, *.xls?, *.ppt?) Extract Metainformation like creation, last access, last modified, by whom, size etc. ...


2

If you just want to dump your thought -- Evernote. It is big enough that even if they go bust someone will come up with something to let you continue using the data. I'd still take offline backup of your Evernote files though -- if your notes are deleted in the cloud, the deletion will be applied to your local copy during the sync operation. If you want to ...


2

My approach is to keep my "Download" folder clean, so usually I install (and then move to trash) any programs immediately (or sort documents into my folder system). If you don't want to spend time installing right away, just leave the installer and make an entry on you todo list: "Install and test software XY"


2

I'm a big fan of MediaWiki (a little hefty for a Wiki, but it's well-supported and open-source, plus I already have a dedicated webserver). On my personal computer, I keep track of notebooks using Basket Notepad which combines note taking with tagging, hierarchy and if so inclined, custom spatial orientation. Again, open-source, cross-platform and can be ...


2

I found this It's not what you read, it's what you ignore video by Scott Hanselman to be very helpful in addressing my own information overload Someone else here shared it in another topic and I learned more in those 40 or so minutes than anywhere else.


2

I have been using JspWiki for the last 5 years. Each page is stored as a text file. Last year I put my local wiki files into a Dropbox folder and now I can at least see my pages also on my mobile phone.


2

The following style works for me . . . . I never randomly search Twitter looking for tweets in a particular topic . . . . Rather, I follow a particular twitter account only if I'm totally convinced with the corresponding tweeter's website by following their newsletters, blogs, posts etc . . .By this way, my twitter feed has only tweets from persons I ...


2

Limiting yourself to just files and folders this is what I would do. Top Level - 2 folders: Active and Dormant. Dormant means completed, cancelled, pending, on-hold or what ever as long as it is NOT WAITING FOR ACTION FROM YOU. Dormant-Second Level - one folder per client/company Dormant-Third Level - one folder per project but named to include the ...


1

I have been using Netvibes.com dashboards as an easy way to quickly visualize which RSS feeds have been updated. You can have several dashboards, and each dashboard can be organized in tabs. Setting-up an RSS feed widget is easy, and middle-clicking on the widget title will open the website in a new browser tab. Personnally, I have set it up so that each ...


1

My approach is GTD-ish. Downloads go to a folder called 0.Inbox, so I deal with them and decide what to do with them and when during processing time. I put all kind of non-urgent stuff in there, and process it when I feel to.



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