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15

It will be worth looking at Scott Hanselman's take on this - he gives a really good productivity talk 'It's not what you read, it's what you ignore', which is a personal favourite of mine. Particularly relevent for me is the section where he talks about News sites - making the point that if news is important enought, you'll find out some other way...


10

I had the same problem as you and here's how I solved my problem. Bear in mind that while this worked for me, it's not a "one size fits all" situation. Clean your subscriptions removed most of my feeds kept the ones from authors with really great content, which I read 90% of the time kept work-related feeds (security updates, partners feeds, competitors ...


9

Write it down Write down everything you want to focus on for the next few hours. Prioritise it Quickly work out what is more important. Delete things that may now seem unimportant. Concentrate on one thing Then for the next 25 minutes just do that one thing. Do not allow yourself to be distracted. Set a timer. Look up the Pomodoro Technique as a guide. ...


7

I often use the costumer reviews from amazon. Not only for books. I read the reviews with one or two stars and the comments of these reviews. If these reviews contain good points which are backed up by arguments I can follow, these reviews give me more hints then the five or four star reviews. Also the comments on these review reveal more pros and cons. ...


6

It's very simple. Never, EVER close your RSS client without marking all as unread read. So, you either open everything up in new windows, instapaper what you really wanna read or you don't open up your RSS client at all. This encourages discipline in estimating time available and drilling down to what you should effectively spend your time on. It's a ...


6

Cleaning out any feeds with a low signal-to-noise ratio and relying more heavily on curated sources is excellent advice that should reduce the number of feed items overall and decrease the volume of uninteresting content. Given that you've done all of that, the remaining improvements are going to be in workflow and how you interact with your reader. My ...


6

Use the Internet but use it mindfully. It's like eating food, you can get your calories from junk food or healthy food. You have to be disciminating about which ckind of food you put into your body and which kind of information you put into your head. All things on the Internet are not correct or useful. Many sites are extremely biased. Try to get a ...


6

I see the key sentence is this: I have trouble focusing. You like learning. That's clear. But I'll bet the list of things you're truly passionate about is a lot shorter than you probably think. What one thing would give you the most regret not having accomplished if you were on your deathbed? Read 70 books on that. Make sure that you make time every ...


5

Limit your choices. You probably have developed lots of practices to succesfully deal with your way of 'scattered' working, but one is missing: cleaning out old stuff. Go through those bookmarks, and if you don't immediately recognize them (don't follow them!): delete. Another one: set time limits. You have 5 minutes to pick a gardening book. Period. It ...


4

It is definitely useful to be able to get the information you need, however you need to place constraints, as there is much more information posted on the Internet each day than a single individual can take in. If you tailor RSS feeds, memberships of sites and news/user groups to the subjects which you are interested in, or that will impact your ...


4

I've found Zite for iPhone/iPad very useful, especially when I accumulate more than 1K unread items in Google Reader. It gives you personalized magazine with topics you're interested in based on how you rate them, but the important thing is that it can use unread feeds from Google Reader as one of the sources.


4

Wikinews is surprisingly solid - the nature of the editing process means that anything that can't be absolutely defended is scrapped... Otherwise I use the BBC.


3

I think voice notes and text notes serve different purposes; they are useful in different situations. Text notes are what I prefer for simple facts I need to remember, when it's clear what the information is, and how I want to preserve it. For example "don't forget to buy eggs" or "remember to email George about the report" aren't things I would put in a ...


3

Use Twitter to follow people who tweet good links instead of subscribing to RSS feeds. You could use instapaper or just email yourself the link to read later if a link is interesting. Remember that You don't have to read everything. Important stuff will be mentioned by multiple sources and tend to come back more than once.


3

Try out offline readers like Instapaper or ReadItLater. This helps in multiple ways While reading the RSS feeds, you can have a quick decision on whether you want to read the whole article later at leisure, or do you think the summary itself is good enough for you to mark it as read. This allows you to work in two modes - the accumulation mode where you ...


3

Here are two tips that could help in your situation: Smaller Tasks - If you find yourself jumping from one thing to another then you should try breaking down your larger tasks into smaller sub-tasks so that you achieve something before your focus shifts to another task. Having smaller tasks will help improve your focus, as the goal will always be closer ...


3

I have thought about this issue for long time now and I have come to some conclusions: Read new stuff in fixed times every day, as Demian has said, for example 0.5 hour each day after lunch, or before going home (don't start with it in the morning in any case, the most important job should be done first) Use an RSS reader with most appropriate feeds to ...


3

I would choose either google alerts or yahoo pipes and then just set up the kind of news you are searching for via keywords and search operators. In your case you should use the minus operator a lot to rule out commentarys, yellow press etc. Take a look at other possible operators http://www.googleguide.com/advanced_operators_reference.html Yahoo ...


2

Read the headline, the first paragraph and the last paragraph. These mostly contain all the info you need, The moment you decide the article is bad, skip it. Don't read any further. Also try to read your articles on a fixed time each day. Don't read articles any other time than the time you have assigned to it. Breaking this law will seriously harm your ...


2

All these answers are workarounds but don't really adress the question that was posed. There's no real way to stop your RSS feeds from becoming a mess and there's no real way to stop information overload. Filtering tools slow this down but aren't enough. You can do your best to pare your feeds or followers but at the end of the day info overload is a symptom ...


2

I have been using Good Noows for my personal use.. It has a list of popular RSS sorted by categories and you can select which RSS you want to view or not. You can also create your own categories. I have created "My feeds" and added some frequents websites I visit daily. It also allows you to view the content in various different layouts suitable for you. ...


2

When I say that I jump from one thing to other, more specifically I'm saying that for >example: I start reading about subject A, then it refers to thing Q, R and S, if I dont know >then I search them then if each of them has x,y,z I search for them so that would give me 9 >different things and be each search say 5 to 10 results that I find interesting. ...


2

I'm not certain the causal link exists here. I too have a vast 'exocortex' but find my memory is still improving in efficiency, despite getting older. As long as you use and challenge your real memory every day it will not atrophy (aside from the expected age-related issues...) so the answer here is to not offload everything onto a memory system, but only ...


2

Many articles will not be worth your time (anyone can host their own blog or site now). You could save time by using a news feed service like the Pulse app for Android. The easiest way to determine good article from bad is to examine the following: Is the site a well-reputed site? If so, the article is probably good quality. Is it a CNN article with ...


2

Your focus is on search. It can be much more productive to ask a question. The SO functionality to detect duplicate questions works quite well and I often find answers there. Explain the problem that you are trying to solve rather than asking how to do X. Then you get the benefit of the creativity of those answering the questions.


2

I found this It's not what you read, it's what you ignore video by Scott Hanselman to be very helpful in addressing my own information overload Someone else here shared it in another topic and I learned more in those 40 or so minutes than anywhere else.


1

I was just thinking about how much searching I do in order to find solutions or an answer to a question. Bookmarks have saved my life! In order to improve the time I spend searching, I have recently just started changing my search query until I find the answer I was looking for. I scan the page quickly to know if it will be useful or not. If it has great ...


1

Visiting blogs that has book reviews can be pretty useful. The problem is that not all the books have proper reviews, and it's sometimes hard to find one if any. However, when you can find the blog, sometimes it's really useful. For example, I use Eli Bendersky's blog to check some of my programming books before buying them. Jon Skeet's review on ...


1

My approach is somewhat like this: First, I like to reduce the number of books to look at. If I am at a library (which for me as a student happens a lot) I already have a small selection, so this number is already limited. But suppose you want to buy a book: Then you can try to get recommendations from colleagues or online reviews. Another approach is to ...


1

I have been using Netvibes.com dashboards as an easy way to quickly visualize which RSS feeds have been updated. You can have several dashboards, and each dashboard can be organized in tabs. Setting-up an RSS feed widget is easy, and middle-clicking on the widget title will open the website in a new browser tab. Personnally, I have set it up so that each ...



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