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40

Putting a group of QWERTY typists against a group of Dvorak typists is not proper research. Dvorak research is usually biased, as to get a perfect measurement, you would have to compare a person typing QWERTY for X years against the same person typing Dvorak for Y years. And even then, the setting he will be in will most likely differ. You should base ...


24

Two notes I'd like to add to what's been said already: You might also consider smaller tweaks instead of changing your whole keyboard layout. Switching the CapsLock key (which is rarely used) to something more useful (like Control, which is in an awful position by default) can make a big difference. Same with the right Alt (I have it as an extra Shift, ...


8

My answer, although a guess, is NO. You are already typing at remarkable speed (and you should be teaching us how to do it*). I don't know how much faster is possible but I would wonder how much time learning a new keyboard would ever be repaid in increased productivity. I personally get concerned with getting too familiar with non-standard settings, ...


5

Depends on what you're doing. I find that it makes typing general papers (reports, memos)—"formal" documents much easier. It just feels better and there is less fatigue. Oddly enough, less formal documents (chat, for example), might feel a bit weirder; there may not be any improvement. For coding, it is sometimes slower, especially as many symbols are at the ...


4

This question is similar to another I answered about DVORAK so I'll link to my response there and add some more information. From my experience DVORAK is not about speed as much as it is about comfort especially if you already type with QWERTY and if you need to switch between the two layouts often. My speed on DVORAK is only slightly faster than it was on ...


3

Thanks to Syd Kerckhove's answer (which also contains very useful extensions), I found Firemacs (http://www.mew.org/~kazu/proj/firemacs/en/) , a Firefox Plugin which directly creates Emacs-like shortcuts in Firefox.


3

I learned to touch type long enough ago that the device I learned on had a lever you pushed with the left hand to accomplish a carriage return. (i.e. manual typewriter). The finger map layout I learned and still use today (at 110wpm on a good day) is your second image. It isn't a new development. I don't believe there are any ergonomic benefits to EDX. ...


3

No, it is not. I've been typing Dvorak since 2000, and before switching I typed 70-90 wpm. Now I type 70-90 wpm. Switching was extraordinarily frustrating at first, and didn't bring any tangible benefits other than geek cred. My QWERTY typing suffered immediately, and while I can switch back and forth now and get up to reasonable speeds after 10 minutes, I ...


3

I just did a little experiment and typed the following without looking at the keyboard: a=a++ - used my middle finger for the = and + a[0] - used my third finger for the [ and 0. used my fourth finger for the ] a?a:b - used my fourth finger for the ? and my pinky for the : There's no right or wrong to this. It's just what I do. And I do touch type ...


3

Dvorak is a great security bonus too. When someone finds my computer unlocked, they can't update my Facebook to something nasty our send out a company-wide embarrassing email :) ..plus I use the Das Keyboard which has unmarked keys :) I type on Dvorak and have for the last 6 years. I have to switch back when at someone else's keyboard. I'm slower on ...


3

I learned typing in QWERTY in high school but never had much need to type a lot. I broke my arm and lost some movement in my right arm. After I went to college I could not stand typing papers for more than an hour at a time because my wrist would hurt to much. I then started typing DVORAK to see if it would help with comfort and it completely has. I will ...


2

For considering effectiveness of Dvorak layout, I think you should also consider the learning curve to "master" it. We are so used with QWERTY that it feels natural for me. While that might make me type 4%, 10% slower than on Dvorak, my productivity bottlenecks are others, such as external distractions, not focusing on the right things (my own ...


1

I suspect code-assist might actually be your friend here - the advantage of programming languages is tha as they are described by a grammar - the editor can help you out a lot more - we're very much in the 'write code v. generate code' area here - what editor are you using? (and I can then expand this answer - you're getting quite a stackoverflowy answer ...


1

More anecdotal evidence pro Dvorak: I have a programmer friend who switched to Dvorak from Qwerty a summer ago when he started having shooting pains in his wrists. Now his speed is about 20 wpm slower (85+ instead of 115) but is he going to go back? (Ans: Dvorak has completely eliminated his wrist pains.) I was also at the same point: completely ...


1

I switched as part of a formal research study when I worked at Tektronix Computer Research Lab on human factors engineering in the 80's. I don't have a copy of my final report, but to summarize: my speed improved about 10% I had remarkably less discomfort at the end of the day it took two 40-hour weeks for me to "break even" with my former Shoals typing ...


1

Qwerty touch typer for 10 years, Dvorak touch typer for 8 years. Comparing myself to my peak speed at Qwerty and peak at Dvorak I would say it's about the same. The difference is negligible. Dvorak vs Qwerty Pros Dvorak Dvorak is much more comfortable for me. I like how it feels. It's possible it's better for you in terms of RSI (repetitive stress ...


1

I personally type in both. I prefer Dvorak, although that may be for status and preference reasons rather than actual efficiency. I believe that having learned Dvorak two or three years ago I may have put more effort into it. I know I'm quicker and more accurate, but it may simply be because I learned later. Switching back and forth isn't much of an ...



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