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31

Text files are future proof. They will always work. Grep is your friend. See also TODO.txt. ASCII is the new PDF! - Cory Doctorow


22

Like first post said, the only future-proof technology is the ASCII (or UTF-8) text file. However, you will soon find yourself wanting more. Amongst many others, I have made substantial use of the following knowledgebase systems. Presenting in chronological order of when I started using it and how much I've written in it: Freemind (200,000+ words): ...


13

Where do you currently keep data you wish to see? For me, spaced repetition is critical to internalize anything. I put a lot of stuff on flashcards that magically goes to my phones, tablets, and interwebs. I still have to consciously spin through my flashcards, but that's become a habit while standing in line, waiting for a long build process, other ...


11

I started building a while ago a personal knowledge base (kb) with similiar requirements and concerns as yours. After considering a lot of different choices, finally settled with a mediawiki installation and haven't regretted since. I'll fundament my choice considering your requirements. future-proof In my point of view, building and practical, ...


8

The problem is, I don't know how to manage and store these kinds of information. Should I just have folders with a little manual for each project type? Or sort my knowledge base based on some arbitrary categories and then browse through all the stuff? It sounds like you're trying to solve a couple of related problems: A method for creating a set of ...


8

I am one of the busy people in group #1. I document a lot because I don't have time to keep answering the same question over and over. A lot of questions are answered by linking to the wiki. Or writing an answer on the wiki and then linking to the wiki. People in group #2 often need nudging. They think they don't have knowledge worth documenting but ...


7

The best way not forget a foreign language is to speak it regularly If you learn some language and then don't using it regularly, it is too normal to forget. It's universal truth. But I want to tell you some tips for this situation. Speak, Speak, Speak! We all agreed about this. Speaking is the best for not forgetting a language. When you have time and ...


7

Since text is a popular answer for this question, I would suggest Emacs, with Org-Mode. It also uses plain text as it's backend but has a lot of features. Links, tags, todo lists, time tracking, tables, basic spreadsheets, publishing/exporting to html and or pdf and support for referencing and embedding source code. Synchronyzing Org-Mode's text files with ...


6

There are 2 ways to do this: choose a solution that will last forever accept that you will need to do a conversion every 5-10 years The first will probably have a much lower functionality than the second. Choose a solution that works best for you now. Make sure that it has "export information" functionality, that you can use when converting to next ...


6

There is imo no simple answer to your question, basically you want to bundle all your knowledge and tasks in one software to sort it and gain inspiration from it. No software does this unfortunately without thinking out yourself a concept of a structure/category/tagging system oriented on your very personal needs. Too much categories/tags and it gets hard to ...


6

Emacs org-mode is probably the way to go. It's everything and the kitchen sink, including: Stores all data in 100% future-proof plain text files Allows easy manipulation, linking, and sorting of text. Emacs is cross-platform, so put your org files in a dropbox folder and work on them everywhere. Runs locally, so you don't need a server running php as with ...


6

There are a lot of universities offering free online courses: Udacity MIT Berkeley Coursera Khan Academy


5

If you have or download iTunes, go to the store and look for iTunesU and choose the Engineering category. There are many Computer Science "shows" here.


4

If your technically inclined take a look at Fossil It is a single executible that provides a Wiki as well as source code control. While you may not need to manage source code you can use the source control aspect of the program to help organize electronic documents and electronic reference meterial. Backing up is simple since the repository is a single ...


4

I think the key here is "being exposed to it so that eventually it becomes part of how I function?". If you never cull your online bookmarks or go through the things you've saved to ReadtItLater, you're in the same boat as you are with your file cabinet. Conversely, given the habit of reviewing/purging on a regular basis, you'll be exposed to it whether it's ...


4

One of the biggest advantages of a wiki format is that it's not a tree structure. You can cross-link from anything to anything, and build a web of information, rather than building silos, which is common in a folder-based, hierarchical system. My advice is to embrace that aspect of the system. I recommend avoiding categories. Instead, focus on making each ...


3

I would like to second @mgois's interest in MediaWiki. What is more future-proof than WikiPedia? But for me, MediaWiki is just a sophisticated front-end for MySQL, and it's more advanced fork, MariaDB. It takes a bit of work to get up to speed with SQL, but once you do, it's pretty amazing. I have 2GB worth of email, dating back to 1992, archived and ...


3

Evernote is future proof when it comes to text/images. You can export the data into html or xml. If Evernote gets replaced by a better tool someone will write a parser to convert the Evernote data into the new format.


3

15 Language resources has a few ideas though the pages are in English just as a heads up. I'd likely consider finding groups where discussions in that language would be common as well as if there are people that will help someone that may be rusty in using the skill. If you think about it, aren't there lots of things you may have done 5 years ago that you ...


3

I think Evernote could be a tool to use in delivering what you want, but you'll have to figure out for yourself how to set up notebooks, tags, and links so it makes sense to you. It has the advantage of being available on all platforms, and able to hold all different kinds of data. But it isn't going to give you an organizational structure, you'll have to ...


3

Either I use a knowledge managment software or if it is just a single lonely link and you don't want to add personal notes a bookmarks tagging software like delicious. It also shows you the bookmarks in chronological order. I explained here how I would tag references/links to find them again fast. Don't use only thematic tags like in a folder system, use ...


3

I highly recommend Workflowy.com. It's a web service that is essentially a single page that contains a list of text items. The thing is that the list can be of unlimited depth (it can contain tens of thousands of text items and more). So you can literally outline your whole life there, starting with big sections (projects, thoughts, knowledge base etc.) and ...


3

Toodledo lets you attach files to tasks but only in the paid version. And they charge per month so it probably isn't a good option. One possibility is to use two tools - one for tasks/comments and one for the material. Such as dropbox and toodledo. Another possibility is to use a tool that isn't a task management tool and make it one. For example, ...


2

The methodology I'm about to suggest here is heavily inspired by GTD, and should actually use it as a foundation. I think when it comes to work, any and all knowledge you could collect is only ever useful if it's put towards a task/project/goal or a habit/routine within a company or an individual's workflow. I think a database for knowledge, even if ...


2

Read books. Not language-instruction books, just whatever you normally like reading - fiction, nonfiction, anything - in the languages you want to retain. If you like reading, it'll be a pleasant way of passing the time, keep you familiar with the language, and actually expand your language skills rather a lot. Go with books written by native speakers - ...


2

If you just want to dump your thought -- Evernote. It is big enough that even if they go bust someone will come up with something to let you continue using the data. I'd still take offline backup of your Evernote files though -- if your notes are deleted in the cloud, the deletion will be applied to your local copy during the sync operation. If you want to ...


2

The same way you get people to do anything - with carrots and sticks. Explain to them why its important and that they're expected to do so, reward them when they do the right thing, punish when they dont. The bigger question is do you really need the busy people to train the others? Maybe you should look at the surgeon/surgery team model, where you have a ...


2

What's the purpose of learning in these areas? Just to learn because you're interested? To write a paper or a book? In case you need to know this information for a job? To pass one or more certification exams? Knowing and being able to clearly express your goal will often help you figure out what you need to get there. That said, I mostly use Evernote ...


2

I've been using Evernote for a long time (20,000+ items now stored in 50+ .enb files) but never upgraded past the v2.2 version because lots of my stuff isn't appropriate for the cloud, plus they never IMO got hierarchical tagging right with the cloud-based versions. The backend storage is standard XML, and there is a flexible export facility, the 2.2 ...


2

A few random thoughts -- workflowy.com is great for list taking across multiple devices i've set up an autohotkey script to automatically deploy a standard set of documents/scripts etc. to a new project directory when I start a project would agree that mindmaps are a great way to quickly establish a framework of ideas and then translate into tangible ...



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