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17

I'd take a look at 1Password or LastPass. They allow you to securely store not just your username but also your password on all of your accounts, and automatically enter them with a keyboard shortcut or a couple clicks whenever you need them.


11

Been there and suffered something similar. At this point your list is overwhelming. You won't feel motivated and surely will be procrasticating a lot. Your brain knows that the price for hard work is more hard work. If you spend a lot of time worring about task and very little about the task themselves some of my ideas might help: Move all tasks that you ...


8

KeePass is another multi-platform, encrypted password store. It holds username, password, site name, site url, and notes. Bonus features include keyboard shortcuts for opening sites and entering username and password; generating passwords according to a provided list of rules (length, allowed characters, etc.); running fabulously off a USB flash drive; and ...


8

Want to Remember Everything You'll Ever Learn? Surrender to This Algorithm talks about SuperMemo, software for this. There are clones to it. "SuperMemo is based on the insight that there is an ideal moment to practice what you've learned. Practice too soon and you waste your time. Practice too late and you've forgotten the material and have to relearn it. ...


8

I used Evernote for quite a while, and I have nothing but good things to say about it. It's perfect for a lot of use cases, and may well be for yours. However, I recently switched from using Evernote to using a Personal Wiki. I have an installation of PmWiki set up on my private hosting, accessible from anywhere with a URL but password protected so that no ...


7

The reason you don't like GTD is because you are not even trying to do GTD: Bored of writing lists longer than 10 tasks. General tasks that never get done. My list is becoming cluttered and ineffective Is there any established method ...? Don't force yourself to get a whole to-do list at once, but re-iteratively improve it. Here are some ...


6

It sounds as though you're calling things "to do lists" when they are really action items about a project-- the kinds of detail you don't need until you're ready to turn to that project. Have you explored David Allen's Getting Things Done approach? You keep only the next action required for each project at the top level, and organize by category e.g. calls ...


5

I think you want Evernote with some add-ons from the trunk. Evernote lets you clip sections or full web pages, create notes, import files. You can do it from a browser add-on, a web application, a desktop program, or a handheld device (iOS, android,others) Anything you add from one client is very quickly available from all other clients. The Evernote ...


5

Someone else already suggested Anki and spaced repetition for optimal learning. I agree 100% with that recommendation, but would caution that your success with the method (or any flashcard method) depends strongly on the quality of the cards you produce. Well-formulated cards are easy to learn; poorly-formulated ones are a hindrance. The creator of ...


4

I find that having lists where I will see them when I need them is helpful. So articles and video links should definitely be stored online. Shopping lists and recipe ideas should be near your kitchen, even if the actual recipe is online. Having a place for everything and having that place make sense is the first important detail to consider. Another idea ...


4

Option 1: Checkvist ($3 p/month) Minimalist keyboard driven online outliner and task manager for teams and individuals. Capture your ideas, create checklists and plans, get everything done — together. Option 2: Trello + List Progress Bar for Trello (free) You may also consider kanban for personal todo list: Trello is a collaboration tool ...


4

In Chalmer and Clark's paper at http://consc.net/papers/extended.html they list the use of pen and paper to perform multiplication as an example of extended cognition, and it seems that the to-do list falls into the same category. Furthermore, from the Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_mind: The main criterion that Clark and ...


3

I have started app called todoist. It has progress bar, karma, priority, and works with chrome, outlook, gmail, and apps for kindle (using that now), ios, and Windows. I fell in love with its simplicity. I added recurring task like this "every Friday @ 9am" and worked perfect. I paid for premium version because I like it and want to see developers eat :) ...


3

If you set tasks that never get done, this could mean that these are things that you don't really care about (and you maybe don't need to do them) or are poorly defined: I once stumbled over some really old tasks and wondered why these were so hard to do: They were not a proper instruction what to do, but rather something like "think about $complex_project". ...


3

The Method of Loci is not the topic you're looking for, but the techniques are well explained there. It basically is a method of memory enhancement which uses visualization to organize and recall information. Many memory contest champions claim to use this technique in order to recall faces, digits, and lists of words. These champions’ successes have little ...


3

The following technique got me through college. And I was taking Computer Programming, so there were tons of technical terms. It allowed me to memorize any list (upto say 12 or 13 items) perfectly. Simply associate each item with a number, and visualize that item / concept with the rhyming number pair word. Here's the list of numbers and their rhyming ...


3

Mendeley is a free alternative to Evernote (but they also have a Pro plan for more features). You can install its client application and use it independently of a Mendeley online account (I did so about a year ago - Things might have changed now). It has fairly good PDF management features. I noticed Mendeley website is becoming like a social media where ...


3

I would suggest using Zotero, I created a Zotero folder "to-read" to pile up the pending papers. You can assign existing properties or make new ones to each individual paper like "PagesRead", "Related Paper", "Tags", "Notes" etc. I have tried Mendeley and many other tools but Zotero stands out to be the best for managing research papers.


3

You need to bite the bullet and get going. There's no reason to throw away your valuable task list --- use it as basis for a personal backlog of things to do. Be sure to perform task triage so you prioritize the most important tasks. The Eisenhower matrix gives you good help: Then work your way through the backlog, adding new tasks as you go.


3

You probably want tasks that have a clear way of knowing whether they have been completed or not. In other words, no vague stuff like be more focused at school, because there's no clear way to know when it is completed. From my experience, the shorter the tasks are, the better it is for motivation because each time you can cross something out as done you ...


2

I use everything that is at hand to write it down. Sending me e-mails, take notes in my notebook etc. Bookmarks to read and different lists too. Use everything that is working for you. But to write down to do one of the things is the most important thing. In GTD you should write down not only what to do, but what the next action would be to do it. Doing ...


2

When I have problems similar to what you describe, I step back to look at my GTD system. I almost always discover the problem is caused by one of two things: entries on a "task list" that really belong on the Projects list general "tasks" instead of explicit Next Actions In GTD terms, a Next Action is a very carefully defined thing, that must result in ...


2

The usual productivity approach is to gather data from hard to reach places into a single place which is easy to reach; one approach is an automated tool as mentioned in the other answer(s), another approach is to store in in a place that is easy to reach but still secure. OneNote allows you to easily store and retrieve data in nodes, also allowing you to ...


2

Having a separate password application means: one more place to have your information spread across one more app to install on every device you use one more app that can become incompatible with a new O/S change or upgrade one more app you'll probably have to pay for, once for each device when you find free versions don't do what you want. I went down ...


2

A task manager tailored to GTD will usually emphasize next actions, contexts, a weekly review and a project list, among other things. A Task Manager may or may not have support for these workflows, and even if it has may not emphasize it in a way that's easy and straightforward to use (e.g. locating projects without next actions) If you don't know or use ...


2

I put research materials into Evernote. The Windows, iOS and Android apps have an integrated PDF reader, so I can read documents wherever I am. I pay for a pro account, so I can have access on handheld devices when I'm offline. Depending on what project the material is for I use different notebooks or tagging to track what has and hasn't been read. For ...


2

I use citeulike, a free alternative of Mendeley. It's web based, and you can upload your personal PDF's. It manages your papers, priority for reading, notes, tags, BibTeX export, etc. Their bookmarklet allows you to export information from journal websites directly (or if you have access to DOI, it accesses databases for you). Personally, I put papers that ...


2

I keep a small notebook and pen in my pocket, and write things there for later. I'm a GTD user, with intermittent Pomodoro within that when I need finer control. In GTD terms, you're asking about "Capture", how to get ideas and thoughts into your system for future processing. I've tried a number of different approaches, from various electronic tools ...


2

I think cherrytree might be what you are looking for. http://www.giuspen.com/cherrytree/ You can insert check-boxes (Edit->Insert special character) and tick them or untick them with a click. http://www.giuspen.com/topic/cherrytree-on-mac-osx/ The image is from Linux, but it's also available for Windows. I don't see it for OSX, but somebody got it ...


2

Your list is making you unhappy, which is why people are recommending that you throw it away. These are people who care about you, they know you, and they probably have some insight into the things on your list. They may feel that you're placing too much emphasis on the things that you have listed. They want you to be free to enjoy life rather than ...



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