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21

This is a most common known Think-Feel-Do triangle about working, living their life etc.. In the same way, it works with about listening. What you think about listening. What you feel about listening. What you do about listening. For this three topic, analyze this page http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/kline-listen/b10ch5.htm Listening is a gift. It ...


14

I don't think that the fact that you can touch the book is all that important. The main differences are first of all that reading doesn't allow you any other simultaneous activities, so that you are much more likely to be fully concentrated on the book. The second difference is that with reading you determine the speed of the information intake. You can slow ...


14

Multitasking is hard. Let me change it. "Useful Multitasking is hard". It takes times. And one of the most important parts is your brain in this process. Human brain doesn’t multi-task like an expert magician; it switches frantically between tasks. In there, real problem occurs when we try to concentrate on the two tasks we are dealing with, because this ...


10

There's a technique called "active listening" that may help. While using it, you listen with a goal of being able to repeat back (paraphrased) what the speaker is saying. There's more than that, but just that much helped me quite a bit years ago. Google the phrase and see what some of the links you find have to say - it may help you.


9

One option is music as Vic noted. Another option is to force yourself to pay attention to your reading. For example, try reading out loud. Or subvocalizing (moving your lips without sound.) This gives your ears something else to focus on - the book you are trying to read. Once you get absorbed in the reading, you can stop reading out loud/subvocalizing ...


9

I read a tip last week, possibly on reddit actually, that a suggestion is to listen to the speaker with the 'intention' that when they finish, you're going to have to explain it back to them. I found this kinda amusing, having just started at a new role and having lots of information go 'woosh' over my head. So I gave it a try. And my goodness does it ...


9

Be less selfish. Shut your inside voice while someone else is speaking. When someone is speaking, stop thinking about YOU. Even when someone nags or whatever, listen to them. Listening to someone isn't necessarily agreeing with them. Don't give advise unless you are explicitly being asked for it. Btw, feel free to tune out when necessary (i.e. gossip, ...


8

You can't. Both of those things require your attention. Which means either one will tune one out or do a poor job at both. There are other things that you can listen to a webcast during though without losing focus - cleaning, reading comics, driving etc. (Granted you still lose some focus, but it's not as drastic.) Programming requires a lot of ...


8

It's quite natural for your mind to wander. If you sit still for a few minutes and try to watch your thoughts, you wil find that your mind is almost continuously going from one thought to another. Fortunately you can train your mind to focus. Try to focus on one task at a time as much as possible. This goes for everything you are doing, even something simple ...


6

Don't. Just don't. Multi-tasking is not the answer. Better time management is. The only time you can multi-task effectively is reading while sitting on the toilet.


6

During listening Be an active listener, not a passive listener. Give some reaction sometimes during the listening (such as nodding, showing your surprise and other feelings etc.). Try to focus on the main subject instead of the words. If possible, give feedback about what you just listened sometimes. This will help both to you and your interlocutor to more ...


5

I've tried listening to podcasts at work... can't do it, I can't pay attention to what's being said unless I stop working. I tried listening to them at the gym and it's the same thing - narrow focus of attention. If I'm doing something I like to be doing it well. But I do listen to music, I use music to affect me while I work, just as much as when I'm at ...


5

One advantage is quite obvious: You can listen to an audio book while doing the dishes, commuting, ... But there lies also the dilemma: When you are doing the dishes you don't have a piece of paper to take notes, and you might not be that concentrated. Another thing might be the fact, that the best form of presentation differs from person to person: An ...


5

I belong to Audible.com, and have listened to over 260 books over the course of four years. I mostly listen to books while commuting (one hour each day), and walking for exercise. As someone pointed out, you wouldn't want to "listen" to a programming language book. I'm not sure that any audio programming books exist -- not on Audible anyway, and they have ...


5

It's possible you have Attention Deficit Disorder.


5

Human chatter piques our attention because it's inconstant and meaningful (as in carrying meaning, not as in being important), that's normal. Your best bet would be to use headphones and play the kind of sound that's just background and won't get in the way of your reading the book. Good candidates for that are, of course, white noise and instrumental ...


5

Here's a few different ideas for you to consider: Julian Treasure: 5 ways to listen better has some ideas that may be of interest when it comes to improving how you listen. Consider doing a contrast between reading a book and hearing an audio version of the same book. Are there vocal cues that add more to the story then just the words? Does the volume, ...


5

Many light non-fiction paper books, such as business or self-improvement titles, could get the same message across in half the space or less. Unfortunately they either repeat the same message too many times or have unimportant passages/chapters tossed in to make the purchase look more attractive. Audiobooks save the day here with their abridged versions, ...


4

When I worked in a busy, noisy, open plan office, I would sometimes throw everything at the problem: foam earplugs stereo ear defenders i.e. with speakers built in for ... pink noise playing in the ear defenders Worked for me.


4

You can't do the same kinds of task together, but you can sometimes do 'multi'-tasking as long as it is an entirely different part of your brain... For example, you can do a task that takes mental concentration, while doing a physical task that you can do on auto-pilot. E.g. Listening to a complex podcast, while jogging. Watching a TED Talk while washing ...


4

A general purpose answer to questions of the form "How do I get better at X?" is "Do more X." In this case, find ways to practice listening to fast speech in situations that are not quite so stressful as a work assignment. Many mp3 players and media players have a way to accelerate playback. You could find relevant spoken word content (podcasts, for ...


3

What distracts you? Is it: other tasks on your mind other things going on around you (radio, TV, ...) emotions, memories, etc. Try to identify what causes your distraction, and then when you know the cause, try to eliminate that cause. For instance, turn off the TV. I am very easily distracted by computer screens, incoming email, etc. so when people ...


3

Aim to be silent as much as possible. Often inattention comes from you thinking about what you're going to say next... which results in you not focusing so much on the other persons conversation. Try making the aim and goal of some conversations to be basically paraphrasing what the other person says, without adding your own 'content'.


3

An big benefit of audiobooks is also their biggest downfall--everywhere accessibility. I would never walk the dog or even hop up the street in the car to get milk without listening to something technical, even if it was just a StackExchange podcast. However that meant my mind never stopped taking in. It never had time to rest or assimilate. It's only when ...


3

Part of the answer, at least, is that some people just can't do it. I can't. I have exactly one verbal input/output stream and switching to a new source requires turning off the old one. If I'm listening to music and someone wants my attention, I have to mute the music. Someone comes in to talk to my officemate, I go get a drink of water and stretch my legs ...


3

My advice is: (1) communicating with people... Advice: Use humor, be humble, admit your ignorance, try to spend most time listening, take an interest in others, do things for others, e.g. offer a ride home, to get coffee while you're getting some, etc, etc. (2) Do the works neatly... Advice: Do a draft, then re-write it afterwards. (3) I have problems ...


3

You could always try the http://www.lumosity.com/ application. It helps me with attention and memory, which could help you too.


2

The stuff I listen to varies considerably, depending on my frame of mind and tasks at hand. I'm one of those people that can't listen to a podcast and do language-basesd work very well. I either find myself not typing or not listening. Music, meh, like you I can get bored with it. That being said, there's a lot of "sound" stuff that you can play with. ...


2

The ability to multi-task differs from person to person, so its important for you to try alternatives and assess what works best for you and enhances in productivity. Listening to a podcast can shield you from external noises and contribute to your ability to concentrate. On the contrary, for a different person, it could well distract your attention if your ...


2

It's good to know your weakness, but it's bad to focus on them. By identifying where you may struggle, you can grow your strengths in the same areas. If you have a problem focusing or listening, you try to overcome that by listening better, taking notes, repeating important things back and asking questions. If you work slowly, you work on improving your ...



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