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10

Don't remember it. Remember where you can find it. As long as you have one place you go to for all problems, you won't need to remember it. Ideas on what that "one place" can be: A wiki (good so your whole team can remember together) OneNote A notebook A file folder A text document Anything. It really doesn't matter what the system is so long as there is ...


3

You may find that your decreased attention span and motivation is the symptom of a greater psychological "block" or problem such as anxiety or depression. Modern medicine is a beautiful thing! Get yourself to the doctor. It's a difficult but obtainable first step. From there, you'll be in good hands. This is the same issue I faced about 3.5 years ago, and ...


3

First off, I think that checking in with a professional, such as a doctor (when was your last physical?), or a counselor/therapist is the best first step. Just print out this excellent post of yours and hand it to them :-) Maybe they'll prescribe something, but they should(!) also look at nutrition, caffeine, sleep, etc. On another front, I recently heard ...


3

I've been struggling with my learning productivity for a while. I've cottoned on to using Spaced Repetition. Here is my list of Do's and Don'ts: Learn before trying to memorize Keep your information in small chunks (split big things up) Start with the basics : Create a summary of just the simple concepts first More advanced concepts will be easier to ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


2

For any long-term memorisation, I've found the venerable spaced repetition to be what works for me. In essence, you first repeat what you want to learn every 1 hour. Then starting from the next day, repeat it once per day for a week. Then repeat it once a week. Once a month. Then once a year. You don't have to limit yourself to just that cycle, but that ...


2

Mnemonics Example one: I was working on memorizing Spanish vocabulary, and I needed to learn that smile = sonrisa. I noticed that sonrisa looks a little bit like sunrise. I thought that a really nice sunrise might make you smile. This helped. Example two: Make up a phrase that includes a set of words you need to remember. Simplify the material and ...


2

I am in your exact situation - a software engineer with similar traits. I did go ahead and got the AD(H)D diagnosis, discovered by our daughter having the same diagnosis. The medical treatments can be quite effective in helping you to increase your attention span. However, remember meds don't teach skills, and you need skills to handle this!!!! I am only ...


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


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The majority of these situations can be solved by a mixture of planning, note taking and habit forming. If it is something you do regularly: This is where habit forming can be useful - you will need to start off consciously doing something every time but then it will become automatic. It helps if you always have a specific mental cue that triggers the ...


1

The peg system is nice for memorising lists with an ORDER. I doubt if using that would be good. You could try associating parts of a word(Foreign part) with something related to an English word. For example, consider the word "zhu*ban*"... You can use the English word ban and imagine yourself banning a friend/enemy from a party you are hosting in a zoo! ...


1

Heres some a great answer provided by (AsapScience) "When looking at the effectiveness of learning, laptops as tools for note-taking do not fair as well as plain-old pen and paper, a study has suggested. Why? Typing is faster than writing on paper, so students are more likely to just type what they're listening to word for word without interpreting. " ...



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