Hot answers tagged

6

Learning is overrated The only reason you would learn something is to apply that knowledge elsewhere. Are you a student? If so, your knowledge should enable you to answer examination questions. Are you a software developer? If so, your knowledge should enable you to contribute to your team or project. Focus on the outcome, not the process, learning is a ...


5

I have a great hack that I use for stuff like this. What's an object in your house that you probably won't pick up until around the time you move to a new address? Maybe your bed? Or some nostalgic possession? Or some piece of art or furniture that doesn't have a good place at your current address? Write a note to yourself reminding yourself of the driver's ...


3

You may find that your decreased attention span and motivation is the symptom of a greater psychological "block" or problem such as anxiety or depression. Modern medicine is a beautiful thing! Get yourself to the doctor. It's a difficult but obtainable first step. From there, you'll be in good hands. This is the same issue I faced about 3.5 years ago, and ...


3

First off, I think that checking in with a professional, such as a doctor (when was your last physical?), or a counselor/therapist is the best first step. Just print out this excellent post of yours and hand it to them :-) Maybe they'll prescribe something, but they should(!) also look at nutrition, caffeine, sleep, etc. On another front, I recently heard ...


2

What you describe is the way I study. Except i write 'books' instead of wiki's because math is easier to write in LaTeX than html. Have a look at http://cs-syd.eu/projects.html to see the notes I've written. I think this is a great idea, especially if you publish your notes. It will force you to make sure they're neat and of high quality. Moreover teaching ...


2

It has been established that you are more likely to remember things that you've written down. I know of no study which examines the productivity benefits of having a personal wiki. But the existence of several such tools does tell us that there are lots of people who like it. Try it and see if it works for you. Myself, I tried creating one but I found ...


2

For any long-term memorisation, I've found the venerable spaced repetition to be what works for me. In essence, you first repeat what you want to learn every 1 hour. Then starting from the next day, repeat it once per day for a week. Then repeat it once a week. Once a month. Then once a year. You don't have to limit yourself to just that cycle, but that ...


2

Mnemonics Example one: I was working on memorizing Spanish vocabulary, and I needed to learn that smile = sonrisa. I noticed that sonrisa looks a little bit like sunrise. I thought that a really nice sunrise might make you smile. This helped. Example two: Make up a phrase that includes a set of words you need to remember. Simplify the material and ...


2

I am in your exact situation - a software engineer with similar traits. I did go ahead and got the AD(H)D diagnosis, discovered by our daughter having the same diagnosis. The medical treatments can be quite effective in helping you to increase your attention span. However, remember meds don't teach skills, and you need skills to handle this!!!! I am only ...


2

There were 3 big rules I remember from the Math department at my uni. if you work reduce your hours - Working even 20 hours a week is a huge time-constraint. Reduce your work-hours Do not fall behind! - Get help , if you are stuck, as soon as you can ! Take good notes, and review after class! My friend made a "cheat sheet" of how to pass a class. He ...


1

You have learned something when you can teach it to someone else and they understand just as much as you do. That would be one of the better definitions though there is the concept of mastery where one can continuously improve as some fields keep on changing or updating. For example, how long does it take you to get dressed and could that be optimized more ...


1

If you need to memorize a string of numbers of some phrase/etc, then please take a look at SuperMemo One of the most compelling is the Dual and Back game. It should be at least as useful as sudoko. Crossword puzzles are good too, and board games like chess (but used sparingly, as chess itself can be a big time-killer). But I need to refer you to a good ...


1

I always use a checklist in a notebook for things like this. Complex and rare events require it. Every task that needs to be completed for the event is noted along with dependencies, timescales and requirements. Once you approach the event, you check off each one as you complete it.


1

Related to veda's answer, you could punish yourself when you forget to do one of these things. A very simple way to do it would be to carry a rubberband around your wrist, and snap yourself everytime you fail to perform a desired action. If you forgot your keys, snap. Left a light on, snap. There was another user here that did a similar type of reward ...



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