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7

It sounds like you are experiencing an anamygdala hijack. An anamygdala hijack is your brain's response to a physical or emotional threat. This reaction prepares your body to either fight the threat or run from the threat. When one experiences an amygdala hijack, the amygdala overtakes the cerebrum (the thinking part of the brain) and there’s little or ...


5

There is a book Memory Pack by Andi Bell where he uses this list of pegwords: 00 — hula hoop 01 — stick or tall tree or a Magic wand 02 — bicycle 03 — comb 04 — car, four tires 05 — starfish or glove 06 — 6-shooter pistol 07 — A Boomerang 08 — octopus or Hour glass 09 — a cat — nine lives 10 — soccer player (Pele wears 10) or a handshake 11 — ...


3

First of all, start earlier if you can. You should be reading ahead of your lectures. I think your strategy is reversed. I would make sure that I memorize the terms as early as possible. Then I would take the time to imagine and explore. Memorizing terms and facts gives you more confidence in your imagination and you may notice additional venues for your ...


3

I've been struggling with my learning productivity for a while. I've cottoned on to using Spaced Repetition. Here is my list of Do's and Don'ts: Learn before trying to memorize Keep your information in small chunks (split big things up) Start with the basics : Create a summary of just the simple concepts first More advanced concepts will be easier to ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


2

Write Anki cards for everything that you consider to be basic that's covered in the university lectures that you attend. Thinking about what's basic has a similar effect than explaining stuff to a 5 year old. Using Anki afterwards allows you to make certain that the knowledge stays available.


1

The peg system is nice for memorising lists with an ORDER. I doubt if using that would be good. You could try associating parts of a word(Foreign part) with something related to an English word. For example, consider the word "zhu*ban*"... You can use the English word ban and imagine yourself banning a friend/enemy from a party you are hosting in a zoo! ...


1

Heres some a great answer provided by (AsapScience) "When looking at the effectiveness of learning, laptops as tools for note-taking do not fair as well as plain-old pen and paper, a study has suggested. Why? Typing is faster than writing on paper, so students are more likely to just type what they're listening to word for word without interpreting. " ...


1

If you are concerned about memorising things then look into memory techniques - there is a guy called 'ron white' who offers some good courses in this area. I used to find doing mind-maps also improve recall. Doing things last minute is fine as long as what you are doing doesn't require deep thought that requires time to digest things.


1

I think this approach is pretty well but start working on the subject on regular basis. If you start doing so, you would not get the headache of memorizing the things just some days before the exam. And even if You will give very little time for the subject but on regular basis you would not forget it. Having Einstein theory is pretty well but for ...


1

The following worked for me: Let your brain realize the importance of the subject: If these things did not have any emotional attachments (and you don't use that info on a regular basis), your brain just gets rid of that with all other useless trash (our natural built-in CLR garbage collection) If you really want to remember these topics in ...


1

Some suggestions: Reduce the effects of stress by learning and applying relaxation techniques. Accept that some effects of stress are inevitable, and take measures to compensate for them. For example, double-check your calculations. Spend more time practising, as that will help you remember them under pressure more easily.


1

This technique will get u thru ur exams but u wont remember anything after the exams are done. It is better to understsnd well the material and memorize it for the first time early on - u dont want to leave that to the last minute, things could happen,emergencies,... - then when u r revising you can memorize it again before ur exam and that way u wont start ...


1

Remembering something becomes a whole lot easier as soon as it carries a meaning to you, or you associate something with it. This even works for nonsense associations. (Which is actually used in a few mnemotic techniques). I'd try a two-tier approach: try to identify those parts of the map you can relate to and reinforce them. (You can use Street View + ...


1

Anki spaced repetition flash cards are ideal. Take the image of the map and open it in your favorite image editor. Remove the labels. If you want to remember countries, put a question mark on one country and then make a card for that country in Anki. On the card I would put the image and the text "country.name". Depending on the case you might also still ...


1

I make heavy use of checklists (in Evernote) for a lot of processes, especially ones I do periodically, but not quite often enough to make them routine actions. The best way I've found to make good ones is to attempt to log every step as I perform it, then edit on reuse. Yes, that's time consuming the first time, and prone to missing things. Expecting to ...


1

As a system engineer I am basically in the same situation, and use Google Services or Onenote as my exobrain. As far as I can tell, it is very difficult to log a task as you do it. However, this seems necessary in the case where you only anticipate doing a task once, but want to record the steps involved in it. The only answer I can think of is: Do the ...



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