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20

Am I destroying my career? Yes you are... UNLESS you gain knowledge outside your current job you will become quite value-less to other companies. You have to keep yourself current. I worked as a SENIOR software developer for 11 years and when I changed positions I was clueless as to all other technologies and methodologies. I had no idea what Scrum was ...


11

I've been a .NET developer for going on 12 years and I'm still as passionate today as I was on day one. If you're stuck witting console apps and don't have much variety in your development work this can be difficult. I think I would probably feel the same as you in this position. The thing that has kept .NET interesting for me is learning all the new ...


6

The short answer: Just efing do it. Force yourself if you must. The long answer: If you are a professional programmer, consult your project manager with this. Tell him that you are having trouble with your productivity and talk to him about helping you divide your work into small tasks, which you will commit on a daily basis. If you are a hobbyist / ...


5

I suggest two things: (Generalizing on Bloodcounts answer) Use external structures that force or remind you. There are tons of those you can think of: A list of (smaller) tasks and milestones, clearly visible ( It helps to plan 'back from the future': In order to accomplish C on day Z, I need to complete B on day Y, and for that I need to complete A on ...


5

Your problem is "good colleagues", they're the ones that keep you at the level you are right now… if you want to do something get out of their lengthy lunches, long walks, useless chats. This will make you uncomfortable with your current state, but that’s the idea! As long as you stay with them, you'll be like them, don’t make friends in office just keep ...


3

Yes, you are destroying your career and you will struggle when the time comes to find a new software engineering position. In my experience, positions at the more interesting companies (above average salary and working conditions) are interesting in seeing your GitHub account to gauge your skills as a coder as well and demonstrating your enthusiasm in ...


3

You can improve your skills AND keep your job. You have spare time to learn - use it! Read up agile methodologies. Write unit tests. Introduce bug database. Etc. Read up Joel Spolsky advice: 12 Steps to Better Code and Getting Things Done When You're Only a Grunt and more.


3

Use your free time to get certifications in things you're interested in. The goal of certification will drive you and will make sure you're actually thorough. Or change jobs - I quit a very cushy and mostly enjoyable job because I had just been doing the same thing too long. 9 years in my case.


3

One of the tips my counselor told me is to "do it for 10 minutes long". and then try keeping that 10 mins undistracted. At the end, you have an option to go on, or go do something else. as long as you started that 10 minutes. Usually, people find themselves getting a hang of the task after 10 minutes, which allow themselves to dive in further. My roommate ...


3

Maybe I should answer "How do I not handle failures in life". We have the tendency to attribute missed goals/targets/opportunities as things that are wrong with ourselves. I 'am' this-or-that. That is not an empowering conclusion. The ironic thing is: it's you drawing that conclusion. Where are the real life facts in there? There are none, it's just a ...


2

Many good points here. Yes, you must learn to deal with politics, but it's a skill that can be learned (and not particularly difficult, compared to some other interpersonal skills). You must also apply your talents in an effective direction (more on that below). And you must be careful not to become a prisoner of your own - or others' - expectations. Beyond ...


2

About your skills You probably are not mediocre. Check this slides from a presentation about the impostor syndrome. Not knowing about a specific technology or methodology is not deadly by itself. You could alway learn about the new shiny buzzword when you start feeling less comfortable with your current job. Also, if you pick something that interest you ...


2

If you want to stay at the top of your career you will need to work hard, take courses and learn the latest and greatest technologies. If you are fairly gifted and are willing to sacrifice a lot of time and effort and if you are lucky you will be promoted to management. On the other hand if you like a decent wage and would like to balance that with a ...


1

It could very well be that the subject simply does not interest you. I would move on to something that you do enjoy. Something that makes you say "I'd rather be doing this than anything else in the world" It could also be that there are some fundamentals about that particular topic that you do not understand as well as you should. It certainly makes me lose ...


1

If you are losing interest, that means you are putting emotions in the whole studying formula. Maybe it's the subject you don't like, I don't know that. For starting and progressing any, switch off how you feel about the subject, whether it is not interesting, or written in such way that it easily bores you. Sometimes, how you feel about certain things can ...


1

Yes, you are destroying your career. I think you have two options: 1- See if you can advance within your company OUT of software development and into the business side of things. Your knowledge of the software will be an asset. And your lack of depth won't hurt you since you won't need it anymore. A lot of advanced developers end up doing that anyway when ...


1

Will it keep you happy? You might want to consider doing a degree or other higher-level course to keep you learning. Ask your company to pay for it and give you time off to revise for example, after all they are likely to gain from your training and interest. If your company does invest in you in this way then give them (mucho) credit for it when you get ...


1

My suggestion Never ever ever compare yourself with anyone else. Most of us have a habit of comparing their condition to someone else close to them and this is the major cause of going deep down and committing another failure. Because you spend more time in calculating what others have and you don't. Step up to the Failure. Don't think too much. If ...


1

Depression is a real thing. Sure, everybody has down spells now and then. But some people have depression for long periods, and no amount of wanting the depression to end will solve it. For those who have not experienced depression, it seems like you should be able to just "think" yourself out of it. But that isn't always possible, and can sometimes make the ...


1

Diet diet diet. Stop eating all sugary foods, any fat except if animal fat, butter or tropical plants, and there's a good case to be made to avoid grains, especially wheat. Instead, eat minimally processed foods like meat, fish, eggs, lots of veggies (raw or cooked) and fresh whole fruit. For recipes, search for Paleo, Primal or (my favorite) ...


1

Work isn't fun as the game you like to play, and it shouldn't be. People that have absolute fun at work are rare. And it's idea of this era that we should all be happy all the time, doing pleasant jobs, having cool hype projects, working happily ever after. Fun and happy part comes after you finish your job, sometimes in between. You are avoiding what ...


1

First, change your language. You are not lazy; you are unmotivated. There is a world of difference. If you define yourself as "lazy" you're assuming the problem is a character flaw, and that implies that it will be difficult to fix underlying issue. This will lead to further lack of interest in fixing things (You also invite comments like "just * do it", ...


1

You want to finish the things as soon as possible, but the thing is you would not take immediate action and keeping delay the job (because you are too lazy to continue again). How about trying Functional/Modular Programming? Programs written in a functional style often consist of functions that take other functions as input. This is a key feature of ...


1

I have gone through what you've talking about and I can see myself through you. First of all you are young, so 20 means 20. Don't be overwhelmed - it's common to be desperate and make things more dramatic than they are. What I did to overcome this? I made a list of achievements. I am in my 30's and I've always wanted to do things so, I hate wasting time to ...


1

I'm no expert, but you sound like you're in a very extreme version of where I often find myself. Here's what I try to do (it seems to work pretty well): Be selfish: think about what you want to get out of life in general. This becomes your purpose. Don't get too crazy about it, and definitely don't let it control you, but use this as the long-term moral to ...



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