Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Personally, the weekly review is what brings all that together. Realistically, you are not going to work on every next action in one week. So just have a list of what next actions you are going to work on and the context in which you will do them. Then at your next weekly review, sort back those actions you completed to the projects they were for. ...


11

No, this is definitely not a mistake. In fact, I'd be very surprised if you didn't find yourself with multiple next actions for a given project. For example, think of any large construction project. There are obviously steps that have clear predecessor-successor relationships: you cannot put up the drywall until the walls are framed, you can't paint until ...


9

So we start on the same page, next actions should be grouped by context, not project: @office versus European vacation. If you're having trouble remembering what project a given action is associated with (although I would think in most cases it would be obvious), then include the project title in the task description. For example: Europe vaca: email Mika ...


8

Try to use MIT concept from ZTD: at the beginning of each week select 3-5 big rocks for week - projects you'll focus on. Then each day select 3-4 Most Important Tasks for that day, according to your weekly plan. This approach will allow you to focus on essential. See http://zenhabits.net/ztd-habit-3-plan/ Another tactic I use is to deal with one-two ...


8

I agree that the weekly review is a good place to tie things together but in many cases I can accomplish several steps of a project between each review, if I just remember them. What I have found useful for this is the Cascading Next Actions described here. Basically, it is just tacking on a "in order to…" or similar phrase to the end of your Next Action, ...


6

How many actions to have in the Next Actions list? You are asking the wrong question here. Your question should be "What actions should be in the Next Actions actions list?" or even better: What are my next actions? Here, what you consider a next action plays a big role. A lot of GTD systems simply solve this by renaming the "Next Actions" list ...


6

After reading this small article by Kelly Waters, How To Prioritise Quickly And Intuitively (read both parts), and doing some experiments in Excel, I can consistently start working within 60 seconds of sitting down at the computer. It's easily done. The first time does take a few minutes, but once your system's in place it's effortless. Do this: Dump your ...


5

I put all next actions I can think of "under" the project. I don't want to think a thought twice. If I think of doing it, I add it to my system. The danger of this, is having dozens of next actions under each project. You could use priority or something similar, to identify what you need to do first. or you can just quickly scan you list. If your next ...


4

In general it's fine to have an action on multiple context lists. For example, phone call actions show up on my @call, @home, and @work lists; I'll check the call list when I'm away from my desk or out-and-about, but I can also make calls at my desk and at home so consolidating calls makes it so I don't have to flip between lists. But easiest way to ...


3

If you want to use a computerized system for GTD I would recommend GQueues or Remember the Milk. I abandoned OneNote very early as it requires too much typing and maintenance that the other systems simply handle. HTH


3

Addition to Adam's answer. The multiple next actions should not have order. If they have the order to finish one after another, then you must have the mistake to identify them.


3

I prefer to use tags. Tags can indicate any number of things: 1. What project(s) the task applies to 2. What the status of it is (I distinguish "Action" from "Next Action") 3. What the priority / context / energy level etc. is for this item Each item can have many tags and I think most organization systems have tags (I use labels in gmail for example) ...


2

I have tried to set this up in RTM. The way I did it is by making projects as tags. Then, when I create the actions, I add the project tag to it. I then have smart lists that look for tags starting from particular prefix (w1- for work p1- for home) plus NA (Next Action) tag and show them as work or home lists correspondingly. I already create a description ...


2

I've had times in which I was in a similar boat you're in. That is - a big pile of NA's that I could potentially pick but due to the long list, I've found it hard to pick the right ones. What I did is tag my NA's according to the following criteria: Duration - a rough estimate (<15min, 30min, 1h, >90min) Energy level - how much energy and focus I need ...


2

You should prioritize the 80+ actions by the importance of them. Remember, by importance not by urgency. They should have some difference on the importance. If you cannot figure out any of the importance difference of them, then they may be not important at all. Just deal with them one by one. When you complete them one by one and the list becomes ...


2

How many actions to have in the Next Actions list and how many to specify in either Projects or Project Support Material? I agree that this is the wrong question because it presupposes that there is a right number. But there are good rules of thumb: You should capture as many next actions as exist, as I explain in this answer on the link between next ...


2

I was struggling with this same issue after my first round through GTD. It is true that David Allen advocates against setting formal priorities on action items. I found that this aspect is better covered in his second book Making It All Work, where there is more emphasis on developing the "Perspective" component of the GTD model. The theory is that if you ...


2

There are several ways to tackle this and it partly depends on the system you're using. I'm using MyLifeOrganized and in cases a next action gets blocked by a @WaitingFor, I mark the next action as dependent on the @WaitingFor item and thus get it off the radar. In a more simplistic system I would get the NA off the NA's list (it is not something you can ...


2

Why not to use some specialized software for this? I could recommend MyLifeOrganized. Using it I have no such problems plus it has synchronization with iPhone, Android and Windows mobile clients.


2

1) you are partly correct. It is a mindset to commit to a set of habits. The tools are artifacts. The instance of tool is not what is important. What is important is that you use the tools you pick and that gets back to a commitment to the habits. 2) Since you are concerned with getting started, I wouldn't about tracking activities. If you were an old hand ...


2

I don't think there can ever be a canonical way of sorting to-do lists, which is pointed out by Randy Pausch in his Time Management Lecture, and Mr. Allen in GTD (where he says the system is the important thing - not the tools). However, Randy, Covey, and others point out something that is missing in GTD - prioritization. But, GTD takes into account what the ...


1

MyLifeOrganized has next action functionality. It also has means for sequental and parallel task ordering, as well as dependencies and hierarchy.


1

Under GTD, you need to think whether that's actually an action or a (mini-)project. If you started it as an action and it turned out to be a whole lot more trouble, upgrade it to a project. Then, you stick the current ex-action as a project title or into project support/mind-map and put the real next-action (e.g. Waiting-For) as the true next action for ...


1

I don't have my GTD book handy, so i'm not sure if this is according to the letter of the book, but here's what I do when I run into the problem. Behind most of those "next actions" is something like a project. Don't waste time prioritizing the next actions, there are too many and they are too fine-grained. Prioritize the projects behind them. Even the ...


1

I see "Next Actions" as a subset of all "Actions" identified in a project's WBS. After working on a project, you identify the next action to be done and mark it as next action in the relevant context. When you next do that next action, you may possibly also do a number of adjacent/related actions in the project's WBS. When you stop, you mark the next action. ...


1

I keep my next action list in a spreadsheet with columns for Next Action, Project, Context. That way I can quickly sort or filter the list according to project or context. I think something like Evernote is fine for keeping support and reference material but terrible for making lists because it has no sorting capability.


1

To clarify, you have one action that relates to multiple projects? Or are you just trying to link actions to projects? You could use Evernote folders as projects, note title as action title, tags for next-action/someday/delegated/reference/complete. Add and remove tags as things get done, that way it you search for "next-action" tags you get everything ...


1

I think Evernote supports keywords/tags, so you could organize things that way; e.g., create a tag "marathon" which would apply to your all your related notes (gear to buy, registration details, overall training schedule and goals, etc.) Or just create a single note for each project with action items in that note; supporting research material could be ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible