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15

I'd take a look at 1Password or LastPass. They allow you to securely store not just your username but also your password on all of your accounts, and automatically enter them with a keyboard shortcut or a couple clicks whenever you need them.


14

Evernote Advantages: There is a free option that will be good enough for many people. Lightning fast search. Searches as you type, instead of having to press enter. This is highly preferable. Good for loose, relatively unconnected ideas that you want to be able to access easily in the future. Great for keeping a journal. It can never be lost, it ...


12

While I don't have day+ breaks when reading, I do have them when writing/blogging/coding/etc. I find something that helps is to leave myself some context as to what was going on. I think this could help you with reading. You don't need a summary of each chapter; you need a way to get back in quickly. I'm thinking when you feel you are about to take a ...


9

Had the same problem. Several solutions: Task Changer TITANIUM, adds a Alt+Tab functionality as overlay screen button, so you can switch between 2 apps with one screen swipe like hitting a keyboard shortcut. Dock4Droid, touching screen on the margin yield pop up bar with recent and favorite apps SwipePad, similar to Dock4Droid All these apps make it ...


8

KeePass is another multi-platform, encrypted password store. It holds username, password, site name, site url, and notes. Bonus features include keyboard shortcuts for opening sites and entering username and password; generating passwords according to a provided list of rules (length, allowed characters, etc.); running fabulously off a USB flash drive; and ...


8

I recommend making a visual map of the key concepts in the text while you read it. This is not only good for understanding the material in the first place, but it will also quickly remind you of the concepts involved and the structure/relationships between them. One free mapping software that I like is Xmind.


6

If you know it already, it's certainly useful. You can get your thoughts to paper faster and more clearly than if you have to write out each letter, abbreviate, or omit words. As for whether or not to learn it, it may be better than voice recognition for a long time, but it's a risk/reward analysis whether it will pay off for your particular circumstances ...


6

Since you're already an Emacs user the obvious answer is Org-mode and it's companion MobileOrg for Android.


6

I think it can be unpopular answer and not in the main stream but I think that the most is about motivation. If you really motivated to remember or to get something from the text you can do "miracles". Of course such answer wouldn't be of any worth if not followed by more explanation. I think before you start to read you need to know why you doing this and ...


5

I'd suggest to use tags for your bookmarks or text snippets (even if you will not directly remember them) use an information management software like DevonThink Pro or Evernote or whatever you like to store useful text information, images and bookmarks and add tags to them. If you store full text instead of only a bookmark, you might be more likely able ...


5

I use org-mode a lot. But you can really use the setup you want. I tried to use todo lists inside org-mode but I prefer other dedicated tools for my todos (like Omnifocus). Mainly for the easier capture tools and sync options those dedicated tools have. But I use org-mode all the time to take notes on projects, books, ideas, write articles etc. I am ...


5

If you want these items out of your email (this appears to be at least a secondary motivation), the best way to collect and aggregate useful snippets is something like OneNote, Dropbox, or Evernote. Each of these applications will have their own strengths and weaknesses, with all of them being very powerful in the accessible and searchable functional areas ...


5

After searching some more, I found there are several shorthand systems resembling standard writing, such as: Forkner Shorthand EasyScript Speed Writing Personal Shorthand Speedwriting SuperWrite Stenoscript If anyone has experience with any of these I'd be curious to hear your comments on them.


5

I am using Opera mini (which for me is the best browser for my Android) and after I select the text I want to save as a note I just click share and choose from a menu with all available applications to save my notes (in my case Evernote - great app to stay organized). I hope this helps.


5

Zim Wiki is simple. It is not a server solution, but as long as you have access to your "zim notebook" (e.g. LAN) you can use it. The nice thing is, everything is stored as a text file. It has some plugins, too, like TODOs or Versioning.


5

Evernote can be used that simply, and has additional features you may find useful if you choose to make use of them. For offline use, you'll need to get a Pro subscription. The offline sync has been flawless for me in the 3+ years I've been using it. Some additional ways Evernote can help make your commute productive: clip web pages into Evernote for ...


4

I have horrible handwriting too: my solution has been to always write in caps. That seems to make a huge difference without having to devote lots of time relearning how to write! Another big thing is to use a pen that's comfortable. For me if the pen is too thin, my writing is way worse than with a fatter pen.


4

You problem description is a subset of the features of Evernote In addition to what you describe, you can define and save searches that use multiple tags and boolean expressions, as well as straight text. You can snap photos and save them to Evernote, any text in the photos becomes searchable. There is a good web application, and native applications for ...


4

So my take on this is that this is the ideal bit of kit for those people who live their lives inside emacs - personally I'm cult of vim rather than church of emacs and I've got a lot of my project review stuff running as macros in there. But I think the point I might make here is the importance of small steps. It's my position that it is very hard to start ...


4

My approach is this: as a firefox user i can assign tags to bookmarks saved in the browser. This tags will be searched along my history when I start typing in the address bar. When tagging my bookmarks, I tend to tag them with several synonyms just to be sure. If a website is very important, I import it into evernote. This way, the site will be downloaded ...


4

My current approach is multi-pronged: if I can't read it now, but want to read it later, I send it to Instapaper once I read something, if it's a link I'd like to go back to later, I send it to Delicious if I want the link handy in my browser, I save it to local bookmarks (synced with XMarks) if there is specific information I want to save for later ...


4

Evernote is probably the tool you're looking for. If you stay under their quotas, it's free and meets this need brilliantly. Everything I could evangelize about here is better covered by their website. But, a few features you might find useful: Tags and Tagged Searches Cross-browser integration for taking, reading, and searching notes. Newer versions of ...


4

There is Simplified Gregg shorthand, which reduces the amount of brief forms that needed to be memorized to only 181. Another one, Diamond Jubilee Gregg shorthand takes this down to 129 brief forms.


4

You should really go for simultaneous note taking; whether it's Google Docs or something Wave, OneNote, MoonEdit, Gobby, SubEthaEdit, UNA Collaborative or whatever fits your group's style. I think that up to 3 persons should be simultaneously note taking given that if you add more people they'll just be duplicating or interrupting each other; so, if you ...


4

While I'm not sure I can answer...since I'm not quite sure of the QUESTION, I'll tell you how I've handled similar circumstances. My biggest issue is that I want my list in ONE place, no matter where I go. However, sometimes I'll be on the road and out of internet/cell range for a week. Other times, I've got a phone that doesn't do websites well. Other ...


4

I don't know Fetchnotes and Simplenote, but I use another tool for the same purpose that seems to meet all your needs: it's called evernote. I need to be able to sync my notes on my Android cell phone and various computers. There is an evernote webapp that runs in your browser, an app on android/windows/mac (and even linux ...


3

I agree with the tools mentioned already. Just want to call out that it's likely your biggest problem is not the technology but your system. And if you are like me, your system needs to be based on context. How do you use, or want to use, the snippets you find? For me, I want two things: topic and process. Topic is like an index. i just want to hit a ...


3

You can leave out the vowels and just write the consonants. This method does take some getting used to, but it does not depend on learning anything new. When you read it back you will be surprised how readable it is. An example: Y cn lv t th vwls nd jst wrt th cnsnnts. Ths mthd ds tk sm gttng sd t, bt t ds nt dpnd n lrnng nthng nw. Whn y rd t bck y wll b ...


3

If you really like printouts being in a physical notebook why not try a ring bound notebook? Then you can just use a hole punch and insert any piece of paper as you require. Modern printers don't really lend themselves well to printing on items which can't be fed through the system - the ones that can are expensive, as you have already noted.



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