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12

While I don't have day+ breaks when reading, I do have them when writing/blogging/coding/etc. I find something that helps is to leave myself some context as to what was going on. I think this could help you with reading. You don't need a summary of each chapter; you need a way to get back in quickly. I'm thinking when you feel you are about to take a ...


8

I recommend making a visual map of the key concepts in the text while you read it. This is not only good for understanding the material in the first place, but it will also quickly remind you of the concepts involved and the structure/relationships between them. One free mapping software that I like is Xmind.


3

I can't take credit for this idea but I read it on lifehacker a while ago and liked the idea so much I adopted it for all of my books (especially technical books). I can't find the original post but here is the slightly modified system I've adopted. Thanks Julian! When you start a new book: Take a piece of paper and write the Book title, author and date ...


2

I think you will be overall more effective if you abandon the idea of categorizing your notes as you take them. Take notes in one step, then organize and categorize as a separate step later. You'll get better notes, and better organization. You are attempting to conflate (at least) two different concepts and types of thinking into a single process. One ...


1

The problem is NOT your handwriting (well, not primarily your handwriting). The problem is this: I'm too impatient to write more slowly than my thoughts pop into my mind. There are three approaches that I take to overcome this problem: Use other, non- written methods where possible Type notes instead of writing them (I use Evernote for this, but ...


1

As the handwriting is the problem, we might find other approaches that will not use it. Something I do to take notes is using the recorder of my smartphone, as I always carry it around. May not be the best option if you are in a public place, but at least you will not be biased by your handwriting and you don't need to stop walking/driving to take your ...


1

I make heavy use of checklists (in Evernote) for a lot of processes, especially ones I do periodically, but not quite often enough to make them routine actions. The best way I've found to make good ones is to attempt to log every step as I perform it, then edit on reuse. Yes, that's time consuming the first time, and prone to missing things. Expecting to ...


1

As a system engineer I am basically in the same situation, and use Google Services or Onenote as my exobrain. As far as I can tell, it is very difficult to log a task as you do it. However, this seems necessary in the case where you only anticipate doing a task once, but want to record the steps involved in it. The only answer I can think of is: Do the ...


1

The best trick I learned with technical books is a glossary. A lot of interruptions and losing 'flow' is because someone doesn't understand a term. This is especially important in mathematical formulas. If you don't remember what a sigma is, you certainly won't understand what it means when combined with a bunch of other squiggly symbols. Write down ...


1

I could say I tried hundreds of them. However, none of them are enough and you have to use a combination of them. I personally use Workflowy as a primary productivity app but I have a special setup which I call it Workflowy Journal since I combined the idea of Bullet Journal with Workflowy. You can read about it here: Workflowy Journal. With this setup I am ...



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