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Some suggestions that work for me: Be Selective You can't make good notes on everything, so try to focus on the things that are likely to have most value to you in the future. How do you decide? Quite honestly, this isn't always easy. Personally, I try to focus on: Things that surprise me. Things I find especially interesting. Things that shape the way ...


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In this answer, I will focus on the reviewing part. You mentioned that you are pretty good at storing away information already, but for the reviewing to work well in the future, the outlining of the content needs to be streamlined in a way that is conductive for effective future comprehension. Other people have covered the note-taking, e.g. summaries, ...


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You can take a look at the Cornell note taking method if you haven't already. I first read about it reading "How to Study in College". (I recommend the book). The principle is that you write the questions on the left side, and the answers on the right side. It's easy then to just hide the right side and quizz yourself as opposed to just reading your notes ...


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You could try using Docear, a software tool that helps you organize information from PDFs in mindmaps. You can add highlights into PDFs with a PDF reader, and then import the text from the highlighted regions into a Docear mindmap. Then, you can organize the text excerpts in your own way. the nice thing is that you can always go back to the source PDF, so ...


2

From your description the tool you need is sublime text. It's an advanced text editor You can download it here for linux, mac and windows. http://www.sublimetext.com/ To remove all occurences of a word: let's say we have a "lorem ipsum" text and we want to remove all occurences of the word "dolore" open your file with sublime text, use ctl+f to ...


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You can try plain old note 'cards' that you can organize quickly, just by rearranging them. Put one essential quotation, remark, question on each. For the repetitive information How would one keep track of which article the notes are from? just use an always-visible list of references (in you case with references numbered 1-50), maybe with abbreviations for ...


2

I use single or two letter codes, written in the margin surrounded by a box. I found that was much speedier than drawing things and the marginal location and the bounding box makes them stand out from regular text. Some of them are surely specific to me and my own system but some of general use: ! - for something surprising or important ? - for a question ...


1

In the old days, 3-ring looseleaf binders and a hanging file system was the way to go. I still use these somewhat, but of course now you want to keep as much material as possible digitally so you can easily search it. And if it can be accessed anywhere from the cloud, so much the better. There are a number of options. Evernote is the most popular, but I ...


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You can use Evernote and create a "tag system" together with notebook to organize your notes for specific subjects. Or you can do as I do and create a markdown system, where you can: create keyword (like xstuff) as suggested by Merlin Mann. use a version control system (like Git) to create a history develop a folder structure to organize your notes ...


1

I had some great suggestions, especially Tabeak's recommendation for Docear, which look great but when I started using it I found it extremely clunky. I opted for a system called TiddlyWiki. It's extremely flexible, customisable and I think it should do everything that I want. It also the most incredible plugin TiddlyMap which provides a mindmap for your ...


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If you have Microsoft Word (I tested with 2010) then the following works: Load your document. Turn on the highlighter (Home tab in the Font section of the ribbon) Mark the words you want to get rid of by double-clicking on them to highlight them. (You can also triple-click to highlight entire paragraphs, or drag over individual sets of words.) When you're ...


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If all words are in separate lines, I would 1) switch to excel (import the file into excel), 2) mark the unwanted words' lines with a sign, 3) filter the signed ones out, and 4) export the remaining words to another text file (copy paste would be sufficient here). If the words are just listed by comma or space (not on separate lines), you could do a ...


1

From your requirements above, it would seem that Trello may be a good solution to your preferred organization system. A single Trello 'board' contains a system of 'lists' which can contain unlimited 'cards'. Each card can contain a variety of content including tags, links, files, etc. And Trello can very easily be setup for GTD use.


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I've been a software engineer for 15 years. Being able to program and design systems is all about recognizing patterns. You learn the fundamentals in school and then you apply the same fundamentals to similar problems. So, what you need to do is start to recognize the patterns. You need to think synthetically, stitching together the bits and pieces you learn ...


1

I would suggest you look at OneNote. It is easy to use, accepts handwriting and is available across all devices. I use it for web clipping, notes, writing, planning, etc, It is like my auxiliary brain. And I can access it from anywhere by smart phone, tablet or computer.


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I quite like gitit for various reasons: It uses pandoc to allow exporting to various file formats, most notably quite neat PDFs via LaTeX You can choose your input syntax, e.g. Markdown, HTML, reStructuredText Automatic table of contents It uses git to version your articles, so you can push/pull to other copies, thus giving you your locally-cached version. ...


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I would suggest to use TagSpaces. It is open source, and allows editing and tagging of multiple file types. It also enables different views like you mentioned. The best thing about it in my opinion is that you can use it with any cloud storage you like.


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I've been searching for these kinds of marginalia symbols for a while! These may not be exactly what you're looking for, but I've found them useful. I use weather "thunderstorm" character (unicode U+2608) to mean "refer to elsewhere" (next/previous page, book, whatever) Five and eight pointed stars for important items Doubled exclamation points for to-dos ...



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