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25

You may be able to decipher your unclear handwriting, but you probably can't read it as quickly and easily as you could if it were neater. Additionally, the right business hand ("hand" is the handwritten corollary to "font") would allow you to write much more quickly than you do now (in addition to being neater). I highly recommend Write Now by Barbara ...


20

Notes will come from all sorts of places: post-its, "note.txt", back of your hand, your brain's cache etc. and its nearly impossible to control that. More important  is to capture everything you can but as soon as convenient, process every disparate note and put them into one trusted place. For myself I have a few common sources for capturing: ...


9

I like wikis and onenote (and I get onenote for free), but for organizing project ideas - especially in early stages, I prefer mindmapping. I use mindomo, but there are plenty of other options. I use it the same way I use a whiteboard, but since I work in a number of locations, it's like taking the whiteboard with me.


9

If using Emacs does not pose a barrier, definitely try Org-mode - it has the Pros of the software solutions you noted, while mitigating or removing many of the Cons. For example, it provides very flexible tree/hierarchical overviews with quick folding and unfolding, tagging, archives, dated entries, linking to other files/websites, and more. You can also ...


7

When I was in college I brought my laptop to every class and used Microsoft OneNote to organize every note I took. I kept a physical notebook with folders for those times when teachers would hand out things that I needed to keep track of or when I wanted to draw something out, but 95% of my class notes existed in OneNote. I also backed up the directories ...


7

There are two key questions: Is it legible to you? Do others read your notes? If you can't instantly decipher what you've written, then you're wasting some time. Instead of aiming to "perfect" your handwriting, a more useful goal would be to get it to the point where you can comprehend what you've written without issue. The above applies if you're the ...


5

There's are a few aspects of your question that need additional clarification, for example; what OS does your server have, and you want notes to sync - but with what ? I personally believe that Microsoft OneNote is a great solution to your needs. There's a OneNote client for just about every desktop and mobile OS out there. Also, if you store your OneNote ...


4

While I'm not sure I can answer...since I'm not quite sure of the QUESTION, I'll tell you how I've handled similar circumstances. My biggest issue is that I want my list in ONE place, no matter where I go. However, sometimes I'll be on the road and out of internet/cell range for a week. Other times, I've got a phone that doesn't do websites well. Other ...


3

If you really like printouts being in a physical notebook why not try a ring bound notebook? Then you can just use a hole punch and insert any piece of paper as you require. Modern printers don't really lend themselves well to printing on items which can't be fed through the system - the ones that can are expensive, as you have already noted.


3

Research shows: the fastest and most legible handwriters avoid cursive. They join only some letters, not all of them: making the easiest joins, skipping the rest, and using print-like shapes for those letters whose cursive and printed shapes disagree. Besides the Getty-Dubay WRITE NOW (an excellent textbook), there are other Resources for learning to write ...


3

The answer to your question is Yes and No, according to the context of your work and definition of your goal. Let me elaborate: Yes: If you have lots of tasks that involve writing on paper, such as essays that are evaluated. If you want to keep an example of good penmanship before your kids or friends. If you have to take notes from lectures and you ...


2

I ran into an interesting approach some time ago: getting rid of todo lists. For me, I don't believe in getting rid of them completely. But, sometimes with not-so-important tasks, you can just forget it and if it comes to your mind, just decide that you will only do that one thing today. This way you can minimize your todo lists and instead use some of the ...


2

I capture notes with Simplenote. For editing I use Notational Velocity (mac), Resophnotes (Win) and Simplenote.app (iPhone/iPad). So, those are all my places I make notes, but everything is in sync. When I capture a written note, I add it to this system as soon as the meeting (e.g.) ends. I'm commenting notes that contain a task with 'todo'. This way I can ...


2

So is there any potential value, productivity-wise, in taking the time to re-acquire this increasingly anachronistic grammar-school skill? This suggests to me you already have some bias against improving your handwriting. One of the questions that no one appears to have asked you is this: how would you measure your productivity gains if you put the ...


2

Do you write more than you type? If not, focusing on your typing speed seems fine. Just bring a computer or iPad to meetings. If you do write a lot, learning/creating your own abbreviation system could help. Writing less characters means being less rushed to write them sloppily. That said, my handwriting has gotten steadily worse over time. I find ...


2

I personally scribble notes on scrap paper, then (as soon as possible) afterwards condense them in my Zim wiki. Zim is a fabulous piece of software. I typically have a page per customer or project, then subpages per meeting or subissue. Zim allows searching (did you ever have to search for something that you discussed three years ago, but you don't really ...


2

I'm not sure why you include a timetable in your planning, but I find this useless unless it is a task which really has to be done at a certain point in time ("call X in his lunch break", "meeting with Y at 11am"). I find it more useful to mark items on a list as "important" and do them first. A schedule has the tendency to easily fall apart (task take ...


2

An interesting open source alternative to Evernote is in my opinion TagSpaces. It is basically a simple file manager with note editing and tagging capabilities. There are releases for windows, mac and linux. Interesting by this project is that the tags are saved in the file names making syncing it easy with for example dropbox.


2

(adding this here as a note to myself) Try the Org mode for Emacs , if you combine it with the MobileOrg you can create and sync notes across android , iOS and any desktop OS that can run Emacs all the while backing the notes file to your choice of "cloud" based service. Its not as polished as Evernote or DevonThink but this is a great open source ...


1

In Evernote, notes are kept in notebooks and tags are assigned to notes, you know this. The main difference is that tags can be used to search across all notes and notebooks whereas notebooks can only be opened to show the notes currently located in that notebook. This makes tags much more powerful. I, for instance, subscribe to the idea that I only need 1 ...


1

I carry a notebook and pen that looks much like yours, all the time. I treat the notebook as a capture device / inbox, and don't consider the pages of the notebook worth preserving, once I've processed the data on the pages. I regularly (at least every couple of days) take any text and process it into my GTD system, adding to my Project or Next Actions ...


1

If you are using MacOS, I would suggest checking out DevonThink Pro. http://www.devontechnologies.com It has the features of Evernote that I like which you can see from the link above. Most notably storage of multiple formats, keyword tagging, and fast search capabilities.


1

Sounds like the issue is with perfection of the process. You need to take the action of the to-do list out of the process of creating one. Ask yourself the following: What do I want this to-do list to do for me? What is the best method to present the to-do list so I can quickly read it and take action? What issues will I have with the to-do list being on a ...


1

I know you have your reasons for not going digital, but you may want to consider something like this: http://www.moleskineus.com/mbl6828-moleskine-tablet-cover-volant-notebook.html It is a cover for your IPad with a slot for a moleskine notebook. This way you can have digital documents along with your written documents; kind of having the best of both ...


1

Me, I keep a keyboard nearby. Failing that I carry a voice recorder and transcribe later. If what you have works for you then there's probably no need to go to the hassle of re-learning the skill. Myself, I have two young children and I'm thinking about fixing up my handwriting as they are giving me grief about my horrible chicken-scratch script.


1

I use WikidPad for notes and store these notes as individual text files in my Dropbox account. WikidPad has a great wiki-like syntax for linking between the files, also it has fast searching, formatting, marking things as complete, etc. Because the note files are still text files, they can be edited by any text editor when WikidPad is not available (e.g. ...



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