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11

I use a trivially simple system suggested by David Allen's Getting Thing Done: things go into manila folders labeled with a cheap printed label maker (easier to read than hand-written) (the one I use). name folders the first thing that comes to mind when you go to file the item; that's how I decide between things like car insurance vs. auto insurance or ...


10

David Seah have a whole bunch of templates or forms that you could print out and use. I found his compact calender quite useful.


9

The answer is simple and straightforward: Minimalism. Don't fall into the trap (that I already did one thousand times) of GTD strategies and Time management Gods/Gurus (or whatever they call themselves) which aim to sell something "complicated" in order to present themselves as more clever and smart than us. Through my research crusade all these years to ...


8

You may want to check out d-i-y-planner. Search terms to find a wealth of templates would include Hipster PDA and diyplanner.


7

My personal preference for learning via flashcard is as follows: I have two decks of cards, one is the "active" deck (stuff I'm just learning) and the other is the "review" deck (stuff I've already learned.) Beginning with the active deck, I pick the cards up and starting with the "question" side, say a foreign word, I give an answer, guessing if I have ...


7

This is essentially a legal question concerning customer relationship. Some documents may have legal provision whereas others may be described in the purchase contract. This answer assumes you are from the United States but keep in mind laws changes frequently and this answer should not be used as legal reference. Is my digitized warranty valid? You ...


6

I think you should use a destinated software for managing your reference files. Article titles usually are quite lengthy and I (personally) would leave them out of the filename or at least only use an abbreviated version. There are a lot of powerful solutions to manage literature and reference information. It would be very helpful to know more about your ...


5

My solution is an incredibly simple paper-based filing system inspired by David Allen's Getting Things Done, and it only relies on a couple of really simple heuristics: Files are stored alphabetically. This is straight from GTD is seems duh obvious, but my previous system grouped warranties in one drawer, insurance in another, etc. In practice it took much ...


5

Scan the receipt for the purchase and any repairs. Use one with OCR. Download the manual, then toss the paper one Scan or download the warranty. If you wish, put in calendar. Or in file name with purchase and expiration date. Put the service schedule in your calendar. Use the "after 3 months" feature so if you get the oil changed late, the next one is 3 ...


5

My approach is that everything that could possibly be used in future gets scanned and sent to evernote. I put the physical piece of paper into a box marked (for the sake of argument) 'Archive Jan' and the Evernote files are placed in a folder marked 'Archive Jan'. At the end of the month I ship the box to my family home for storage (you could just put it ...


4

The whole Filofax concept works like this - you have a binder and a vast range of inserts you buy to fill it. The link I have given you is a UK one, but I think they are available everywhere. (aside: I used to use one, but these days I seem to use 5 different small notebooks which live in different places - one by the computer, one by the cooker, one in ...


4

There's a company that had a Kickstarter project hit over the summer that lets you build you own custom bound journals. The company is called Bound Custom Journals and seems like it'd do what you want. If you want to see more details of how their process works, you can check out their Kickstarter page.


4

I'm in my late 40's and fought the filing monster all of my adult life. But a few years ago I bought the $30 kit from FreedomFiler, and it has made a world of difference. Over the years I would make up a filing system, and diligently start using it. But somehow, self-invented filing systems seemed (for me) to have an interesting flaw: I didn't always file ...


4

You should really go for simultaneous note taking; whether it's Google Docs or something Wave, OneNote, MoonEdit, Gobby, SubEthaEdit, UNA Collaborative or whatever fits your group's style. I think that up to 3 persons should be simultaneously note taking given that if you add more people they'll just be duplicating or interrupting each other; so, if you ...


4

At home I do something vaguely similar, but my routine is as follows: Keep ALL paper for 1 year After 1 year, keep all bank statements, receipts for work, pension plans etc for a further 2 years but scan all the items that are shredded. After 3 years, keep mortgage documents for a further 4 years, but again, scan all shredded items Then scan everything and ...


4

I have horrible handwriting too: my solution has been to always write in caps. That seems to make a huge difference without having to devote lots of time relearning how to write! Another big thing is to use a pen that's comfortable. For me if the pen is too thin, my writing is way worse than with a fatter pen.


4

I use a binder along the 43 folders concept from GTD: 31 sections for the next 31 days, 12 sections for the next months. Every piece of paper that requires action on a particular day gets put into the binder in the corresponding section (daily if less than one month out, monthly if more). Every morning, I process whatever awaits me for this day and shift ...


4

K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) At the start of each day, I write a simple list with bullet circles in front of each item. I've found that 6 tasks per day is about the limit of what I can accomplish. For tasks that have a date to be done by or on, I put the date in the margin to the left of the bullet. Started tasks get one slash. Complete tasks get the ...


3

I don't understand what the question really is. There are two aspects: Do you want to have a more effective way how to sort the documents? Then sort them in a hierarchy like this: 1. job (subfolders 1.1 job A, 1.2 job B). Every time a category gets big enough it gets split up. Keep a good track of the hierarchy structure. This of course means that you will ...


3

This Novus B54 heavy-duty long-arm stapler supposedly can handle 170 sheets. You get what you pay for -- not cheap.


3

I would suggest this Mini Booklet Stapler: or this Swingline Saddle Stapler for Center Stitch and Binding Stapling.


3

First of all: when you review vocabulary, you always have to shuffle the set of cards before you go through them. Since our brain is so good at remembering patterns, otherwise you're likely to include the sequence of words as a main clue in your learning. This means that they're dramatically less accessible outside of this sequence (i.e. whenever you ...


3

I have a system that is both digital and analog (paper), because that is the world we live in, there is physical "stuff" and digital "stuff". The way I keep the two sides of a project tied together is through labels. Lets say the project is "Draft paper on new sales technique using free ipads". First, the digital system. I have a 'ProjectSupport' ...


3

Since you can't scan everything, you need physical folders of some kind. The main question is then how to include references to these into your electronic system. An obvious one here would be to just have these as "left-lower-drawer/project-five-folder" or something like this, the same way you would have references to electronic documents. Since you may ...


3

While having One Trusted Place for everything in Life might be great philosophically, it isn't necessary in practical terms (and sometimes out-of-reach as you've discovered). As long as you maintain One Trusted Place for home items and One Trusted Place for workplace items you should be okay. And since your workplace is putting such restrictions on the ...


3

Total Recall: How the E-Memory Revolution Will Change Everything, a book by Gordon Bell and Jim Gemmell provides a good background into electronic record keeping and guidelines for what you should keep. There are also YouTube videos of Gordon and Jim talking about electronic record keeping, eg., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dq8hhPqgWcs Essentially they ...


3

Maybe you should reevaluate if you really need a notepad. Generally, I find that would use pen/paper for two reasons: Quickly write down some text/numbers Do some quick and dirty UML modeling while coding (i.e. pictures with boxes and arrows) For (1) one I've completely switched over to using OneNote, so that solves the pen/paper problem. WinKey-N (or ...


3

Three suggestions: - Use a notepad as a mouse pad. You can use any standard notebook or even just a pile of paper. If you want to be a little fancier, you can use a paper mousepad from Knock Knock. I did a quick profile check and see you're Canadian; you can find tons of these at Chapters/Indigo/Coles. - If you're only making small notes, just use a ...


3

If you really like printouts being in a physical notebook why not try a ring bound notebook? Then you can just use a hole punch and insert any piece of paper as you require. Modern printers don't really lend themselves well to printing on items which can't be fed through the system - the ones that can are expensive, as you have already noted.


3

I don't find writing down works really well during a lot of my day, including subway, while walking, etc. I gave up on having something always handy to write with and instead use my phone and voice-recognition or an audio recorder app. Before that I used a super-tiny voice-/memo-recorder (which has the advantage of working where there's no cell coverage). ...



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