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2

About your skills You probably are not mediocre. Check this slides from a presentation about the impostor syndrome. Not knowing about a specific technology or methodology is not deadly by itself. You could alway learn about the new shiny buzzword when you start feeling less comfortable with your current job. Also, if you pick something that interest you ...


1

Yes, you are destroying your career. I think you have two options: 1- See if you can advance within your company OUT of software development and into the business side of things. Your knowledge of the software will be an asset. And your lack of depth won't hurt you since you won't need it anymore. A lot of advanced developers end up doing that anyway when ...


1

Will it keep you happy? You might want to consider doing a degree or other higher-level course to keep you learning. Ask your company to pay for it and give you time off to revise for example, after all they are likely to gain from your training and interest. If your company does invest in you in this way then give them (mucho) credit for it when you get ...


2

If you want to stay at the top of your career you will need to work hard, take courses and learn the latest and greatest technologies. If you are fairly gifted and are willing to sacrifice a lot of time and effort and if you are lucky you will be promoted to management. On the other hand if you like a decent wage and would like to balance that with a ...


3

Yes, you are destroying your career and you will struggle when the time comes to find a new software engineering position. In my experience, positions at the more interesting companies (above average salary and working conditions) are interesting in seeing your GitHub account to gauge your skills as a coder as well and demonstrating your enthusiasm in ...


3

You can improve your skills AND keep your job. You have spare time to learn - use it! Read up agile methodologies. Write unit tests. Introduce bug database. Etc. Read up Joel Spolsky advice: 12 Steps to Better Code and Getting Things Done When You're Only a Grunt and more.


5

Your problem is "good colleagues", they're the ones that keep you at the level you are right now… if you want to do something get out of their lengthy lunches, long walks, useless chats. This will make you uncomfortable with your current state, but that’s the idea! As long as you stay with them, you'll be like them, don’t make friends in office just keep ...


3

Use your free time to get certifications in things you're interested in. The goal of certification will drive you and will make sure you're actually thorough. Or change jobs - I quit a very cushy and mostly enjoyable job because I had just been doing the same thing too long. 9 years in my case.


7

You have an advantage in your current position in that you have time to actually research and apply new technologies to what you are doing thanks to the pace in your environment, and you will get paid to do it. I would take as much advantage of that as possible to sharpen your skills.


19

Am I destroying my career? Yes you are... UNLESS you gain knowledge outside your current job you will become quite value-less to other companies. You have to keep yourself current. I worked as a SENIOR software developer for 11 years and when I changed positions I was clueless as to all other technologies and methodologies. I had no idea what Scrum was ...


11

I've been a .NET developer for going on 12 years and I'm still as passionate today as I was on day one. If you're stuck witting console apps and don't have much variety in your development work this can be difficult. I think I would probably feel the same as you in this position. The thing that has kept .NET interesting for me is learning all the new ...



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