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29

Exercise can make you think better, more creatively, refresh the brain, your energy level, etc. It does take energy, but it gives you some too in the long run. Also, exercise doesn't have to be boring - sports are fun. But if you don't want to waste time while exercising, you can read while on an exercise bike. As for eating well, one can buy a salad at ...


15

How do you make effective use of time available with "low energy"? Do easy tasks. Go through your list and pick the easiest, most mindless task you can find and do it. Seeing the task get crossed off will give you a little more motivation to keep going, creating a positive spiral. If you're truly burnt out, stop trying to force yourself to work and ...


13

Not only does health contributes to an improved wellness, it's also been proven to prevent losses in productivity due to own illness or that of a family member. Technically speaking that is. One can still claim illness for the purpose of skipping a day or two at work but still using his time better than if he was sick. A study of the Commonwealth Fund ...


9

As @John said - it is key that you understand your high and low points. My highs are early morning and late evening, with lows at 2am and 3 - 3.30pm. During those low points do something else - in the case of the 2am one, I try to be asleep:-) but for the afternoon one, I get a coffee, go for a walk, read the paper, listen to some music...anything for ...


8

You asked about evidence and I may not provide scientific evidence, but can provide my personal notes and experience. You can consider that as a sample type of answer, because there will be many people like me in this world (I cannot be such a unique sample after all :)) I have seen many successful people, and most of them (about 80%) appear fit. Mostly ...


6

The book "How the Brain Learns", Sousa, discusses learning time vs. retention variability. It cites ~40 minute chunks as being optimal, and further breaks those down into an initial 5-15 minute time with a 5-minute break at 20 minutes, following by another peak time near the end. Some original studies can be found in an older paper, "The variation of ...


6

I agree that you shouldn't try to make yourself productive when tired. Sometimes you have to though. Suppose you work for 8 hours and then there is a "production problem" that can't wait because the users can't logon to the bank. It has to be dealt with right now if not 20 minutes ago. You need energy so you drink coffee and have candy. This spikes your ...


6

John Medina in "Brain Rules" provides a strong point on how important exercise is to our brain. Here is the start: BRAIN RULE RUNDOWN Exercise boosts brain power. The human brain evolved under conditions of almost constant motion. From this, one might predict that the optimal environment for processing information would include motion. That ...


3

I guess this involves knowing how to work with your natural energy level. If you recognize that you can't tackle the high-importance things, then don't. Do something that matches your energy level, or switch gears to bring your energy level back up again (exercise?) if you really need to.


3

Research at the University of Bristol shows that exercise boosts cognitive function, creativity, problem solving and and productivity; here is an excerpt: In 2005, a study conducted by the University of Bristol suggested that doing exercise before going to work, or at lunchtime, helps eliminate stress and improves productivity. The study concluded that ...


3

Your mention of the weather changes brings two thoughts to mind. First, do you have any trouble with headaches on these days? Weather changes are a common trigger for migraines (which need not be severe, pain-wise, to bring the rest of the symptoms along) and "migraine fog" feels a lot as how you describe. Second, consider mimicking the light level of a ...


3

So consider the idea that it might be your body trying to tell you something... I'm sleeping a lot at the moment because I'm fighting off a heavy cold and I'm really glad that, because I'm quite organised, there's nothing that can't be put off for a few days while I have some R&R... Maybe the correlation runs the other way... so not 'If I get up late, ...


3

Well, this looks a lot more organized than many people manage, so you are in a very good spot to start with. At the same time, looking at it from the point of view of GTD, you seem to have WAY TOO MANY next action lists. In FreeMind, in Email, in TaskTracking tools, in Calendar, etc. I think - if you need all those locations - I would switch to thinking of ...


3

This is incredibly variable from one person to the next. Your best bet is to identify what you are best at at different times of day and under different circumstances. As an example: I work at my best on technical, detailed or strategic tasks early in the morning or late at night I am most creative late morning or early evening so tend to write ...


3

If you know beforehand that you are going to wake up late the following day, try preparing for something exciting to do the first thing the day you wake up late. Preferably something that would give you a sense of accomplishment in a short amount of time. Then you might feel that you are on the roll and you might want to do something else. On the contrary, ...


2

I think there are two factors at play here. Firstly why did you get up late? If you overslept because you spent the previous night knocking back Jack Daniels, that may also be the reason that you're not having the most productive of days. Whatever your reason for not getting out of bed it boils down to the fact that you didn't get out of bed because you ...


2

GTD requires a certain amount of energy and willpower to engage with the workflow and summon the mental determination necessary to cut through the ambiguity and evaluate the related context when making the decisions the system imposes on you. When you are in a low energy state this can be an insurmountable hurdle, leading you to give up and procrastinate or ...


2

On low energy i do routine tasks. Or switch tasks to something completely other. Or just rest (tee, etc) for 10-15 min.


2

I think whatever system works for you will work for you - It might help us to know what type of work you do as well so we can adjust our answers to fit... freemind mind maps: I use one mindmap per project. I work constantly with them tracking next actions to do, information organized, etc This is really interesting for me because I use mindmaps in a ...


2

Well your implementation is more or less similar to mine. There is a very big difference. I do not devote the initial 45 minutes to work review. This 45 minutes in itself is a big work and get fatigue if I go through this process. I review the work done during the day and next day work in the evening. I mentally prepare the work I need to do first thing in ...


1

Getting sick is indeed a blow to your productivity. There's not much you can do when you've caught a cold. The best thing you can do is to avoid getting sick in the future: Wash your hands often to clear away all those viruses and bacteria Keep your fingers away from your nose, eyes, mouth Avoid public transportation, best thing is to walk or bicycle your ...


1

Waking up early to work probably gives you A tight deadline before you go to work A clear head allowing you to take a step back and see things from different perspectives Renewed energy ...all of which combine into increased productivity. I should do this more myself... The disadvantage is that when I do it I often don't go to bed early enough so I end ...


1

My suggestion would be to find what are your recharging activities. Do you get recharged after socializing with people? Do you get recharged after playing video games for 10-15 minutes? Do you get recharged after watching an educational video? Find what charges you up and do that when you are low. What recharges you may take more than a little practice ...



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