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17

My system looks like this: I start by mentally dividin my working day into 4 equal parts. To keep things simple, let's say they're each 1.5 hours long. I choose 3 high priority objectives for the day, and write them down. The objectives I choose should be about the right size to achieve in 1.5 hours. The last 1.5 hour slot is for low-priority work. I ...


12

First of all; GTD, Pomodoro and planning are 3 different things! GTD is basically a method to keep track of all your activities so you don't forget anything. From a GTD perspective all you need to do right now is to add the first step of your project to your to-do list (for example, go to the bookstore to buy a book on Unit3d). If you finish that activity, ...


10

I try to use the Pomodoro technique whenever I notice that I am slacking off. Basically, I work in 25 minute chunks. Within those 25 minutes, I make sure that all I'm doing is productive work. After the 25 minutes, I have 5 minutes to do whatever I want. More information about Pomodoro technique here: http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/


9

Short answer: You have to readjust. You can't do it all at once so there has to be some time sequencing to it. This time sequencing is determined by your own priorities. Daily to do lists are vulnerable to being blown apart by surprises. Most tasks are better suited to contextual task lists, for example, things to do @home, @work, @school etc. With an ...


7

Go to the gym immediately after work, eat something a few hours after lunch and something right after work as well. When you get used to this, and when you are not hungry, it's not hard at all. Try to get a friend to go to the gym with, that way, you won't just have to tell that stupid excuse to yourself, you'll also have to tell it to your friend ;-) ...


6

The pomodoro techinque is good, but you also might try just making a physical (paper) list of the top 1-3 things you're supposed to be working on and putting it in front of you without time constraints (a task list that floats above everything else on your computer desktop would work too, but I find paper/post-it's work better). There is something very ...


6

To increase the likelihood to act my plans I personally use "positive reinforcement" Instead of going with a punishment, I go with a reward if I complete my plan. Example : I'm lazy to go running but If I go running 3 times this week in exchange I will allow myself a nice restaurant meal which is something I love. It's generally more efficient to go with ...


6

One of the best ways to organize your day is to separate the 'could dos' from the 'should dos'. Often we get weighed down by the length of our to-do lists when in fact there is usually only a small number of really important items that we should be focusing on. Therefore, it can be helpful to ask yourself questions such as "If I could accomplish only 2 ...


5

It depends. Sometimes the problem is in what you are avoiding to do. Sometimes the problem is in what you are doing instead. In your specific situation, the problem may be avoiding the book, or it may be inability to turn off FB. I guess most people will assume that you have problem reading the book, which is where various motivators, plans, TO DOs, ...


5

The Urgent/Important Matrix may be a useful tool to help identify where are you spending time. The idea here is to break up what you do by considering if something is "Urgent" and/or "Important" forming a 2 x 2 matrix that can be interesting to consider what work you do on a regular basis. A second point would be to consider what payoffs do you get from ...


5

You can download templates for such things online, for example I found this one using a Google search for "daily planner template".


5

How to manage the spilled task within deadline? It's easy. You move it. Seriously, if the interruptions are happening at such scale that you can't keep up with your original plan, that means that either your original planning was too ambitious or you are not handling interruptions properly. Assuming that you do your best, it condenses to a plan. Now, no ...


4

I think 90 days is the absolute most you can plan out in a single time period. And I mean in terms of a full project or to work on a bigger goal. 90 days is something our minds comprehend and we can logistically plan out very well too. But anything more becomes super hard. But when it comes to accurate planning and "accuracy" is the big word here, planning ...


4

The main app I use specifically for this is Daytum. I use it primarily on my iPhone, but you can use their web interface as well. It generates nice graphs and allows you to track recurring activities as long as you have numeric values (emails processed, calories eaten, weight lost, miles driven/run/cycled, pages read, push-ups, you name it !).


4

I've spent a whole lot of my life learning and/or teaching- both technical topics including some of the ones mentioned and non-technical topics like dance, presentation giving, and management topics. I find that there's a big difference for most people between what I'll call "project time" and "study time", and I'd conjecture that there's probably other ...


4

You want to convert intent into action. David Allen author of Getting Things Done prescribes the natural Planning Model. You ask yourself in this order Why? What? How? and then organize projects and perform actions. Here's my take on that. It all starts with some thinking. Pure thinking. Visualize Learning a new language is a guiding principle for you. ...


4

"Plan from the future". In order to have C at date Z, I need to complete B at date Y, and therefore A needs to be done at date X (X < Y < Z). That way you have good intermediate checkpoints. Then break down into smaller parts. Reward yourself. In your schedule, plan rewards as well - things you really want, maybe even think you should not have/do them. ...


4

There are sites like Stickk, which make you sign a "commitment contract," and forfeit some money if you don't meet your commitment. There are other stories about people who commit to donating large sums to organizations they hate (even the KKK!) if they fail to meet their commitments. "Loss avoidance" would motivate you to hit your goal if you used one of ...


3

I have a fairly balanced methodology: Write down - a list of all the tasks I have in my to-do list Prioritise - by deadline, importance, etc Delegate - where relevant and possible Estimate time - based on experience of similar tasks Postpone - if necessary, but postponement should raise priority so things don't get postponed forever Breaks - build in down ...


3

What you're doing is called procrastination, and you're certainly not alone. That's why there's a wealth of online tips on how to stop it. They may not all be scientifically proven, but give some of them a try and see if they work for you. Some examples: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Procrastinating Forbes Magazine: Just Do It: How to (Finally!) Stop ...


3

I have battled with this question of projects also, but my understanding is that project names/titles are all that is stored on a Projects List. (This is a separate list than your 'next actions' list). However, I must admit that I do NOT have a Projects list in my work system, because things just move too fast - I only want to look in one place. I use ...


3

It's not such a strange problem! It has even had a name for literally thousands of years: Akrasia. My startup, Beeminder, is trying to get to the heart of the psychology behind akrasia. It's kind of like StickK for data nerds. The idea is to combine commitment contracts with quantified-self-style tracking and data visualization. Sorry for the self-...


3

Emacs org-mode (http://orgmode.org/ ) does all what you want (and much more). It is also text-based (like your current approach), but much more powerful, as it lets you create an hierarchical structure of goals / projects / tasks that lets you group tasks below the projects and goals they belong to assign start or due dates to any "heading" in this ...


3

Product development teams need to embrace the fact that unexpected things will happen along the course of their projects. It is simply very difficult to set and enforce strict deadlines due to the inherent complexity. If you do, for instance due to external constraints, you need to either dump part of the project, compromize its quality or quickly get more ...


3

This question would probably better suited for the Project Management Stack. As was stated GTD is a methodology for processing and gather your to-do items. In the context of a software development project, what you are trying to create is a backlog of items to be completed, which are related to the overall product. A project, in Project Management terms, ...


3

What I used to tell my clients was: 60% to 70% of my time will be spent preparing and/or planning. This is probably most analogous to the Pareto principle of 80% of the value coming from 20% of input. It's what you do during that planning that makes the difference. If you are "just sitting around" thinking about it, and plotting a course, there's probably ...


3

In any kind of engineering, it is to be expected that inferior solutions result if you skip planning your projects. No matter what project management method you use (Waterfall, Agile etc.) you need planning to avoid choosing a poor route. Planning a project normally involves evaluating different ideas, technologies, proposed user interfaces etc. Often ...


3

My friend, you've come across a principle of life that most people never learn: You need feedback to improve. You don't get any real feedback unless you do it. Planning has diminishing returns. You won't ever know everything about the project, and very often it takes more time to think of all the things that can go wrong than it would take to get it ...


3

Some days are better than others. Some days we find ourselves in a flow state for hours at a stretch getting incredible things done and other days we can't seem to get dressed without spilling our coffee, waking up the baby and stepping on the dog (who then barks and wakes up your spouse). You have to learn and accept that we can't be over-achieving ...


3

Remember the Hofstadter's law (and also the planning fallacy). I certainly can't do what I plan to do. I learned to constantly fail to achieve all of what I planned to do, and not feel guilty. Do what is important and constantly give up things that turned out to be not that important.



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