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This may be a bit late, but there is actually a program in Beta right now that can help. It's called SkedPal, and I happen to be a time management researcher who wrote 2 books before it came out. (I joined the Advisory Board as a result.) I just completed an article that shows how people who use 4 different behaviors respond to disruptions to their daily ...


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There's come pretty interesting research on this very question that concludes that the longer the horizon, the less likely the task will be done as planned. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-morin/3-scientific-strategies-for-overcoming-procrastination_b_7468606.html The article shows how illogical we are in our thinking. Here are some details. 1. ...


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Here's an article I wrote on this topic that shows that people use one of four techniques and must migrate their techniques as time demands increase. Learning to Optimize Each Day's Plan from the Controversy Between Listers and Schedulers [ Research] Also, here's a diagram from the article.


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This response is a bit late to this thread... sorry! In short, I believe the best way to schedule your day is to match the number of tasks with the right technique. Research shows that most people use one of three techniques: Memory, Lists and/or Schedules. However, there is a new planning technology emerging that I call "auto-optimizing' in the diagram ...



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