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1

I suggest you start with what GTD calls 'natural planning'. You write down ANYTHING you think you need to do/learn to achieve your goal. Don't try to organise this at all yet. Don't sort the list, don't think about who might be involved or responsible yet. After that, you will find you can group the objectives into bigger blocks. You will structure the plan ...


0

Since you haven't spelled out what your goal is, I'll take a goal as an example. Let's say your goal is to write a 3D game in C++ in one year and you havn't written a single line of code ever. Your first action should be to make a plan. Something like learn basic C++, learn OpenGL, learn game logic and so on. Break it down, break it down even further than ...


0

I am also with you in same boat but here is what I develop for this new year. As for this year I decides to develop a compiler. now for me this take almost a year as I am working as full day developer. So what I do is first find phases of Compiler Compiler construction(means what are the important things that come in compiler so by learning those things ...


2

Forming a habit is the hard part. Commitment and perseverance is the key. Here I'll give some tips from my experience. Hit the Gym in the morning. That way you feel pumped up for the whole day and you'll be active and productive for most part of the day. Find a Gym mate so that you'll stop giving stupid excuses and your guilty conscious will get you up ...


2

If going to the gym makes you more alert, try going to the gym before work. This will have some spin-off benefits, such as raising your metabolism and alertness at work, and possibly helping productivity in itself. Then study 4 evenings out of 5. Plan in a rest day, and check out Pomodoro for effective time management. And most importantly, if you find ...


5

Go to the gym immediately after work, eat something a few hours after lunch and something right after work as well. When you get used to this, and when you are not hungry, it's not hard at all. Try to get a friend to go to the gym with, that way, you won't just have to tell that stupid excuse to yourself, you'll also have to tell it to your friend ;-) ...


2

Pick one task and do it regularly. After you've got the habbit - start doing the other one as well. You don't have to go to gym everyday, btw. 2-3 times a week is OK. You don't have to study every day as well. And you don't have to do it at same days when you go to gym, obviously.


3

I think storing the complete list of tasks outside of the brain is part of many time-management systems, including GTD you've mentioned. I don't remember GTD advocating detailed and rigid planning though - I think it is more about easily finding the next actionable item. For the methods of prioritizing the tasks for your day/session you could check Mark ...


3

Much of personal productivity methodology seems to be based on reducing the strain on the brain of deciding what to do. No, it isn't. Methodologies you refer to are about making decisions once and at a right time, instead of dragging them along, and about externalizing memory (since our brain seems to be more fit for recognition rather than ...



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