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7

The general answers is - no, you should not continue after the timer. More realistical answer - it depends, but generally, no. There are result-based and process-based approaches to productivity. Pomodoro is the latter one - the process based. The goal is to give you maximum time of focused attention per day. When you follow the procedure - switching ...


4

In fact, you should watch your timer so that you can start reviewing five minutes before the end of your pomodoro. This according to the pomodoro website. I suspect, however, that you might be doing something for which it takes blocks of time longer than 25 minutes to process a 'unit' of work. I recommend setting your timer to 35 or 50 minutes, if you can ...


4

Rigid breaks in the middle of troubleshooting a problem (coding or otherwise) interrupt flow. I think Pomodoro is great for some things, but the underlying concept is more important than the exact minute by minute breakdown. Instead of a timer, I'd suggest planning ahead and working on X-page chunks at a time ... depends on the size of the book/font but 10 ...


3

I'm relatively new to the Pomodoro system, but here's something that might work: instead of cutting yourself off, postpone the activity. So instead of saying no to reading the next article or clicking the next link, put it on a list somewhere. When you get a break, read the next thing on the list. Anything fun or interesting you encounter, put it on the list ...


2

Associate rewards with your work. You like to spend your time chatting with your friend? Tell yourself that you can earn 15 minutes of chatting 'only if' you have studied for 45 minutes. You like listening to songs? You can listen to 'one' song 'only' in the 5 minute break of Pomodoro. You want to play sports in the evening? Tell yourself that it is ...


2

https://pomotodo.com/ From the above: "Your todolist and Pomodoro records stay updated across all your devices. You can use Pomotodo anywhere and anytime you want, even offline!" "Contains full workflow management. Collect ideas, schedule works, finish tasks and review history right in the app." 'nuff said.


2

Certainly, if you are mid-sentence or about to complete a step, thought, or action, finish that. Then take the 5- or 15-minute break. But try to avoid extending the work period any appreciable length of time (like "doubling up" work periods). A good deal of the advantage of using pomodoro is having the break, so that you go back to the task refreshed. ...


1

One of my company's development teams created a browser-based version called Marinara Timer that allows you to tweak the length of the pomodoro and breaks. We just put it up so people outside the company can use it. You can even share the link to your team so you're all on the same timer. I'd love your feedback.


1

Any visual timer will work. The original "pomodoro timer" was a tomato shaped windup kitchen timer. A quick search on Google for "visual timer" turned up several that look suitable. Another search for "vibrating timer" found additional candidates. To use it for pomodoro technique, set it for 25 minutes then for 5minutes.


1

I like kanbanflow. It combines a kanban style to do list with the pomodoro method. I run it on my work computer through Chrome, and it has an Android and Iphone versions too.


1

There is an webapp called Pomotasker that can work on desktop and mobile browsers. Also it can store your task on the cloud, so that you can start your pomodoro on desktop and continue on mobile. Or you can use it as I do: add tasks on mobile before you forget and you'll have your task list ready when you get to your desk. Currently on beta but I'haven't ...


1

Very surprised to not see any mention of Pomotodo so far, considering I had to look into the second page too! Pomotodo is two things: a pomodoro timer/logger, and a TODO list. Part of the reason I've been using it for so long is because I've never been satisfied with a single program for each... but this one works well if you're a fan of TODO-lists. It's ...


1

It seems that no one mentioned Marinara Timer yet and it's pretty powerful as it lets you customise the length of each pomodoro and rest, adjust the sounds played and even provides you with a global URL so that you can easily use it on multiple devices in sync at the same time. To use, simply go to marinaratimer.com/ANYURL


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Menubar Countdown: Works on OS X Simple And Customizable Free


1

So for OS X there's also this Pomodoro Timer app Features: Shows remaining time Customizable Length Nice UI Drawback: High Price(It was 1.99 but I figure they've increased the price which is a little bit ridiculous now for such a simple App)


1

In addition to the earlier answers, what helps a lot for me is keeping a log while I work. Especially for tasks that require a lot of "working memory" in my head, like programming. As a logging tool I use mindmapping software, but a simple text file or pen and paper could work as well. Every couple of minutes, or at least at the end of each pomodoro, I ...


1

I'd like to suggest Focus Timer for Mac. I'm the developer of this app and i'm using it every day. The main idea behind this timer is that you should not be distracted be the timer app itself, unlike most timers do. To achieve that timer have no sophisticated interface - just a few buttons.



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