Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

I found working sequentially to be a lot more effective than in parallel. A great piece on the subject is Unitasking by Trent Walton: I noticed something interesting the day I was confined to just 13” of screen space. Even though I couldn’t see everything I needed to operate and reference at once, I became more focused. Only seeing one window at a ...


12

There's two things going on here. The thing that I think is going to help you the most is recording and remembering your goal. The second is trying to figure out how to manage multiple projects. Understanding your goal will, in all likelihood, help you understand how to prioritize and manage. I have a similar problem in that I've always got lots of ...


4

The key to this is actually in both ends - the very high level biew; and the detail view. First off, you have 'Must do errands' - so subconsciously you have already prioritised. Look at your highest level headings - are all these things you need to do? They may be, but it is worth confirming this before you waste time going into depth. Now look at the ...


4

I understand your problem very well: the core of GTD (ore many other approaches) is "writing everything down" to free the mind. That's a good thing, but it can lead to such overload as you describe it. My recommendation: Prioritize your projects only write the one very next action for each project on the list you review often decide, which projects you ...


4

It seems like you are asking for a personal experience, and the short answer to this question is "it depends". It depends on my overall workload, on the degree of my interest in tasks, on whether the boss keeps asking me to get it done, and so on and so forth. But to approach the question formally, I'd divide all tasks into four parts: Important and ...


3

After trying a mess of time management "systems", I finally came up with something that's working for me quite well. I use google calendar...but instead of tasks, I set up appointments for myself. They're color coded yellow for work, gray for errands & home stuff, green for personal projects or "me time" and red for a scheduled, actual appointment. The ...


3

Obviously, you should not do this if the cost of tagging your tasks exceeds the benefit of having them. There is really no way of knowing what works for you until you've tried it. Many productivity systems involve trying to estimate the effort that a task requires, so it may be a good idea. Personally, I believe personal productivity systems should minimize ...


2

Mind always does at least 2 task in parallel: One you can observe, another you can't. The second task is basically related to body, routine activities etc. For example: You can listen music when you are traveling or waling. Because both tasks don't require much concentration. You can read books while relaxing your legs in water. Do tasks sequentially ...


2

Since you are open to non-software approaches I'll tell you what I do. But since what I do is a personalized version of the old Franklin Day Planner system (that I have implemented in a spreadsheet rather than their planner book) I just checked the Franklin site to see what they have. They do have a software options and from the video I don't see this being ...


2

The way taught to me on various priority management courses took into account a variety of aspects including: Urgency/Deadline If it is due tomorrow, you'd best do it now. This value goes up as you get closer to that deadline. Age It is often easier to tackle a problem when it is new, and the description is fresh in your mind, so rather than let even ...


1

Could you lump tasks together and prioritise them as a bundle? One way to do that would be to prioritise entire projects, then prioritise the tasks in only the highest priority projects. Or, divide projects into phases, and only prioritise the tasks in the next phase. Another approach would be to come up with a system where you don't have to re-prioritize ...


1

When it comes to personal relationships such as you describe, I've found it helpful to think about things in terms of quality-of-life. For instance--and bear with me through this example--who does the laundry? Is it worth it to you to spend $100.00 month to have a laundry service take care of that so you and your partner can spend a couple more hours ...


1

I've always found myself to be far more productive when I do one thing at a time, even when the task is repeating. Take, for example, that you must make lots of envelopes. Each envelope has three items to be included,two address stickers to attach, and of course each envelope must be closed by removing a tape. One way would be to: 1. Take one item from each ...


1

Emacs org-mode - 2 ways for implementing it with recurring dates Emacs org-mode (http://www.orgmode.org) has start dates ("scheduled") and deadline-dates ("DEADLINE") for tasks, which also can be used for recurring tasks. see http://orgmode.org/manual/Repeated-tasks.html In the "agenda view" (customizable views of tasks, which can also be filtered/sorted ...


1

If I have multiple tasks that need to be worked on at the same time, I discuss that with my boss and the stakeholders and we determine the actual priority order I will work them in. There can never be two number 1 priorities and don't ever agreeto such a thing (one client tried to give us 32 number one priorities out of a list of 33, we sent the list back ...


1

In addition to the standard criteria (urgency, importance, ease, etc.), I also added dependencies. If I'm likely to get stuck or need information from someone else or the like, I start sooner so I can get what I need before the deadline.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible