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Robert Byrne's answer hints to it: David Allen's approach to prioritisation is reviewing your Horizons of Focus.


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In my work, I have explored the transition that one must make from one technique to another in order to deal with a greater number of self-imposed tasks (which I call time demands.) It appears that you have reached the limit of what GTD (as a set of practices) can handle. It's extremely helpful for someone who realizes that a single To-Do List won't work ...


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As a person who has read both books (and GTD) I will give you my 2 cents. Firstly, to answer your question I would say that those are fair statements about both books and how they differ. However, in my journeys through the world of productivity I have yet to find a system that works for me entirely. What I have found are a bunch of tips and methods from ...


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Sorry, haven't read the books, but yes, Mark Twain's advice to eat a frog first thing every morning is common advice, often coupled with the (old Carnegie Steel) Charles Schwab's "6 most important things I must do tomorrow" list, where you start with the most important and work down. That works great for many people, who are often surprised how much it ...


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Some relevant observations based on scientific findings: Never multitask (doing multiple things at the same time) because the human brain can't do this effectively. Focus on one task at a time. There's nothing inherently bad about committing to several tasks within a certain time period. Keep task switching to a minimum to minimize the costs associated ...



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