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4

I think it is both of those definitions. The idea of important is that they are important to you. (or someone else that you care about which transitively makes them important to you.) The things that aren't important are things you should minimize because they aren't providing value. Also, time management is more than just the four categories. Things can be ...


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The Eisenhower matrix visualizes different combinations of importance and urgency, and helps you to perform task triage effectively: Speaking in economical terms, the highest cost of failing to perform a task will be found in the A-tasks quadrant.


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In Covey's model, "urgent" means that a task requires immediate attention. For example, a ringing phone, catching a flight or preparing for a meeting tomorrow. They are the the items in our to-do list that shout “Now!”. The main problem with these tasks is that they usually put us in a reactive mode, one marked by a defensive, negative, hurried, and ...


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IMO importance is applied top down. I refer to David Allen's horizons of focus. Top level, purpose is singular. Next level down you have roles and responsibilities. Most people have a four or five of these at any given time. These are normally equally important, but it depends on the person. Below these levels are goals and projects long term and short ...


2

I think it is a matter of my priorities: Have I been given a deadline by a boss or client? Am I unable to reschedule this task? e.g. Can't wait until next week because I'm at a conference. There is no negative history of contacting this other person. I'd be less inclined to automatically call, but it is something to think about. A big problem in many ...


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Ask yourself this: "How much will this affect my life 3 years from now?" or "Will this be remembered at my funeral?" The bigger the impact, the more important it is. You'll find that most chores are actually not very important - making the bed and dusting the fan usually. Things like brushing your teeth might actually have decent importance, because ...


1

I think Eisenhower's choice of importance and urgency are a bit basic... or crude. Many people use other tags to greater effect. Let me explain... In my book, I defined the term "time demands" to represent all tasks that are internal, individual commitments to complete actions in the future. (I later found it close to be the definition of what 2 ...


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The point of the exercise is so that you don't focus on things that you have made a conscious decision are unimportant. Without the exercise, you might just focus on things you feel intrinsically motivated to work on. The distinction that you are making shows you the things you wouldn't do if you hadn't made a conscious decision to do them in spite of ...


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I am using such application: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dayagendaplanner It is updating schedule when you change something. You can also change tasks order so in the end you know how it will turn out, in the middle of busy day.


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One of the best books to help you answer your question is How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton Christensen. In particular, it focuses on evaluating the differences between external factors (money, status, job security) and internal factors (challenging work, recognition, personal growth). As someone who is still very early in their career, there is no ...


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Should one always choose the most important thing to do first and resist all other factors no matter what the cost is? I learnt that "the most important thing" may change. I've strugled with it for years because something always had to be compromised (work/future work/exercise/family/my mental wel-being). Most people have rather stable timetable so I'll ...


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Here is my attempt at doing this numbering scheme, which might help illuminate my goal of uniforming tasks in different categories into one prioritised list: Assign each category a base value according to overall priority of that category: Cat A: Become more active = 15 Cat B: Help parents = 12 Cat C: Fun stuff = 5 Assign the levels a decimal value to ...


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This is how I priority my tasks using the ABCDE - {123456} method. Remember the list is not a real list, the example I am taking is to make you see my point. A: important task I can't miss. Missing this task will affect my life in a way B: Task I can do later and it doesn't affect me much C: Optional task/pro-active tasks that I can delegate to someone ...


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When it comes to personal relationships such as you describe, I've found it helpful to think about things in terms of quality-of-life. For instance--and bear with me through this example--who does the laundry? Is it worth it to you to spend $100.00 month to have a laundry service take care of that so you and your partner can spend a couple more hours ...



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