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Assuming he has some willingness, set aside some distraction free time and go over your system and how/why/when. If he has some interest, offer to coach him in things. Your system may not be right for him, but it's a tweakable starting point. Maybe check into Leo Babauta's The Power of Less - it's a pretty easy read and has the idea about laying the 3 most ...


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One of the things I tell my kids is that to get someone else to do something you have to get them to want to do it. Until your friend wants to change, he won't. And when he does, he'll do it in the way that he thinks is right, which may not mesh with what you think is right. The underlying issue is self-image. There's a saying that every person finds what ...


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Keeping in mind my conflict of interest which is about to become obvious, there are a bunch of tools you could point such a person to. Ie, commitment device apps, especially those that focus on turning long-term goals into a hard commitment to make steady daily progress. You'll never believe which tool I think does that best (it's Beeminder). Here's a list ...


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He needs intrinsic motivation, a reason for him to do the work required. Without that, all well meant attempts will fail. So if there's anything you want to contribute it would be to have a conversation about his motivation. The four points you come up with are not about that, so forget them. That conversation has a prerequisite: is he willing to have ...


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As a young person, I found that programming was the only thing I could do 12 hours a day, or all night. As a bit older person, I realized that wasn't sustainable. I can do it when I need to, but not for extended periods. So pace yourself. The most important thing that comes to mind is make sure you are developing design, planning, and best-practice skills. ...


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I am also a teenage programmer. I was introduced when I was 4 years old, and my interest has been pretty strong since then. That is, until I went to high-school. I got sucked into "all that", and I lost interest because the times were changing, and the technology was evolving faster than I could learn it. I ditched that hobby and did good ole' high-schooler ...


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I really don't intend to spam, but it seems silly to paraprase everything. Today MotivationGrid published one of my articles about how to break out of the marasm/stagnation. I'm listing the paragraphs + a bit of content. If you're interested in the wntire article feel free to visit their website (10 Ways To Snap Yourself Out Of A Slump) 1) Never start ...


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I had the same problem. I lost my interest in coding and I got back into it by following strict discipline. Here is what I did : I started with 20-10 rule. What it means is, every day, i had 20 min to come up with a problem, and 10 min to implement it. I used to set a timer for 20 min, used to look at apps on my phone, and tried to think of how the UI ...



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