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12

This is called Rubber Ducking, or when programming Rubber duck debugging. I suggest you place a rubber duck on your desk and explain your problem to it.


9

Different people work best in different ways. The Pomodoro Technique encourages frequent breaks. The bursts are traditionally a little longer than yours, but you can set whatever times you want on the timer. I think by walking around, so I take a lot of "breaks" too. When working on knowns, I think your span or work between breaks will increase. However, I ...


4

You say it's counter intuitive, but that's where your intuition fails. There is nothing wrong with your approach. Taking a step back and letting the issue ferment for a while works. That's why you get your best ideas under the shower. This is especially true when creativity is concerned, which is an aspect of a coder's job. You also take on a different ...


3

When I have to, or want to, do things that I do not take much pleasure in-- or that I find myself losing interest in very quickly-- I give myself a timer. Tell yourself, I'm going to work on this hard problem for ten minutes, 20, an hour! You can work your way up. Or start big. If the problem is going to take many hours, or days, or months, then you need ...


3

A GTD Project will have an outcome and is generally expected to be done within a year or so. The things you list sound more like they are components of what GTD describes as "Areas of Focus", also known as the 20,000 foot level (with the runway being tasks, 10,000 feet is current projects, 30,000 feet is 1-3 year goals, 40,000 feet is 5 year goals, and ...


3

I like the lightweight Mac App nvALT, which is a fork of Notational Velocity. The intended workflow is to make it super easy to capture notes by binding a keyboard shortcut to a command that brings up the application and makes it easy to create a new note or search existing notes. Because the search is so fast, instead of using tags or another taxonomy ...


3

Emacs Org-Mode (You might not want to try this if you don't like computers.) I won't tell you all about emacs and org-mode, because that's a horribly deep rabbit hole, but I can give you some pointers. Emacs org-mode, along with remember-mode (what you need), allows you to take notes in the same way you think of them. It allows you to tag information, as ...


2

Emacs org-mode (http://orgmode.org/ ) does all what you want (and much more). It is also text-based (like your current approach), but much more powerful, as it lets you create an hierarchical structure of goals / projects / tasks that lets you group tasks below the projects and goals they belong to assign start or due dates to any "heading" in this ...


2

I think cherrytree might be what you are looking for. http://www.giuspen.com/cherrytree/ You can insert check-boxes (Edit->Insert special character) and tick them or untick them with a click. http://www.giuspen.com/topic/cherrytree-on-mac-osx/ The image is from Linux, but it's also available for Windows. I don't see it for OSX, but somebody got it ...


2

The majority of these situations can be solved by a mixture of planning, note taking and habit forming. If it is something you do regularly: This is where habit forming can be useful - you will need to start off consciously doing something every time but then it will become automatic. It helps if you always have a specific mental cue that triggers the ...


1

I recommend you use Trello for this. You can create a board for your goals with a list per time-period (for example "yearly goals", m"monthly boards"...) You can also create a board per week for example with default ToDo, Doing, Done or whatever lists in it. You can fully search in Trello. Also use labels. For time-tracking and much more I recommend you use ...


1

Try PDesk (Was a Windows project manager which synced to the Palm OS; now Back by popular demand, on several OS flavours!) from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pdesk/ I have actually organised a web team and projects over two floors of a building, each of us able to somehow open and edit a single file on a file server. Pdesk is ridiculously simple to look ...



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