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10

The answer here is really simple, if you ask me: If you feel that you can solve the problem or if you are in the right "mood" you must keep going because that state is hard then to replicate in the future. If you struggle with a problem and can't come up with a solution, the best thing, at least for me, is to sleep over it. The new day brings me new ways ...


4

No, projects are not contexts. A Context is defined by resources required to do actions that are in that context. For an example outdated by most people's current technology, you can't make phone calls on your @Phone context list unless you are somewhere with a telephone. A more subtle resource is time - you may choose to define one context for tasks ...


3

A GTD Project will have an outcome and is generally expected to be done within a year or so. The things you list sound more like they are components of what GTD describes as "Areas of Focus", also known as the 20,000 foot level (with the runway being tasks, 10,000 feet is current projects, 30,000 feet is 1-3 year goals, 40,000 feet is 5 year goals, and ...


3

I like the lightweight Mac App nvALT, which is a fork of Notational Velocity. The intended workflow is to make it super easy to capture notes by binding a keyboard shortcut to a command that brings up the application and makes it easy to create a new note or search existing notes. Because the search is so fast, instead of using tags or another taxonomy ...


3

Emacs Org-Mode (You might not want to try this if you don't like computers.) I won't tell you all about emacs and org-mode, because that's a horribly deep rabbit hole, but I can give you some pointers. Emacs org-mode, along with remember-mode (what you need), allows you to take notes in the same way you think of them. It allows you to tag information, as ...


2

Yes, you most certainly can have control over dates by using Gantt diagrams within a GTD system. GTD is about the process and not about the tools you use. The process being is as follows... Collecting things and ideas that have your attention. Clarifying what each of those things and ideas mean to you by deciding on outcomes and next actions to achieve ...


2

My answer is no as well, but with a my own interpretation of what projects and contexts mean to me. Projects A project is any work that takes more that one action to complete. Contexts A context is a situation or place where things can get done. It can be a specific place: like your car or the local dry cleaner store where you have to pick up your ...


2

Except for the "set aside a small amount of time each day " advice, I would like to add another one (maybe not applicable to everyone): Get up earlier in the morning and work on your side project for about 2 hours It has two benefits: No distractions from your family which would be more productive than working during the evening with your kids running ...


1

It seems counterproductive because we like to think "hard work" is the same thing as spending time on a task. But it isn't. Search for why breaks are productive or the Pomodairo Technique to see why just ploughing ahead with something isn't the best approach. Whether it is time to sleep or just take a break or go for a walk, giving your brain a rest to ...


1

There are 3 areas you can address that will each help you complete the project: 1. The project itself The first thing to do is to pare down your project to the absolute bare minimum that could possibly be useful. Now you've got your real project. Put everything else on a "nice to have" list and forget about it. Once you've done this (and be really ...


1

I can't say I've looked in detail at everybody's answer, but it looks like the trend is to focus on potential for improving the effective use of your spare time. In this case spare time would be any time that hasn't been "blocked off" for your day job or your family. I think the family thing is pretty much immutable - you've chosen to have a family, and ...


1

I make the decision this way: I will stay late (up as long as I am productive) if and only if I will be able to sleep until rested once I finally stop working. If I have to be at work at 8 am the next morning, I will not stay up until 4 am. If I can come in at noon, I will. The reason is simple. The productivity gained from working late almost never ...


1

Kanban Tool is probably something you are looking for. It's a visual project management application that allows to share tasks and documents as well as to communicate with team members by adding comments (you can add them via email). The app has a free version.


1

I recommend you use Trello for this. You can create a board for your goals with a list per time-period (for example "yearly goals", m"monthly boards"...) You can also create a board per week for example with default ToDo, Doing, Done or whatever lists in it. You can fully search in Trello. Also use labels. For time-tracking and much more I recommend you use ...


1

Emacs org-mode (http://orgmode.org/ ) does all what you want (and much more). It is also text-based (like your current approach), but much more powerful, as it lets you create an hierarchical structure of goals / projects / tasks that lets you group tasks below the projects and goals they belong to assign start or due dates to any "heading" in this ...


1

Try PDesk (Was a Windows project manager which synced to the Palm OS; now Back by popular demand, on several OS flavours!) from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pdesk/ I have actually organised a web team and projects over two floors of a building, each of us able to somehow open and edit a single file on a file server. Pdesk is ridiculously simple to look ...


1

It depends on how you handle multiple tasks at a same time. One can be efficient, but at the same time, one can't given justice to any of the task. Being multi-tasker is a real talent. It trains mind to think beyond the limits and handle stress pretty well. Multi-tasking skill improves interest in work as one is no more working on same thing again and ...


1

As Gruber states the human brain is not ready for a "round robin". If you still want to try this method, you could change to the other project on the large pause after four pomodoros. But I woudn't recommend it. Or maybe you could add some gamification. As you complete goals on the boring project, you allow yourself to work N pomodoros on the exciting ...



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