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7

Try this alertness test: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/need-sleep/whats-in-it-for-you/how-awake-are-you. This reaction time test may also interest you: http://www.topendsports.com/testing/reactiontest.htm


7

I use RescueTime, it's great! It has superb reporting, you can see your activity per day, week, month, etc. Another awesome feature is that it can distinguish between productive activity and non-productive activity, you can view per category / application how much time you have spent on it. You can checkout Scott Hanselman's review for further details:


6

I don't think keystrokes are a good metric. You can sit and type and backspace all day long to get a high keystroke count, and not have any productivity. Or play typing speed games. You don't want to measure activity, you want to measure results. I suggest a better proxy is "pages produced", using some standard definition of a page. For example, page ...


5

Have a look at the review paper "The assessment of fatigue - A practical guide for clinicians and researchers" http://simonwessely.com/downloads/publications/CFS/159.pdf Although this paper aims to clinical populations (physical and neurological diseases as well as psychiatric disorders) some scales may be useful for you. UPDATE: If the above link does ...


4

You could try Workrave. It's a tool to help prevent RSI rather than a time management tool, but it keeps track of mouse movement and number of keystrokes.


3

Very interesting question. I would very much like to know how to do so too! Here's a short list of things I can think of. Self-inquiry give a score of 1-5 of how tired you are. @Kardashev3's answer contains lists of questions you can ask) Physical strength test how many repeats can you make on a some exercise? (e.g. hand grips or push-ups) Reaction ...


2

From your question it sounds to me like you want to measure your productivity but are you sure that's what you really care about? Wouldn't you prefer to measure the value you are producing? Choosing the right metric is critical to achieving your goals. Choose the wrong one and you may never reach your goals no matter how high your metric gets. I don't think ...


1

I don't think "tired" is the accurate indicator. I believe (for people who work at computers) the assessment metric is mental energy. The proxy I use for mental energy is the easy at which I can start new tasks. When I find I don't want to complete even simple tasks (answering email, updating documentation, etc), it's a strong indicator my mental energy ...


1

My method is a reduced form of mindfullness meditation. I use downtimes of the day to focus on my breath and try to abandon thoughts, observing them as they rise. Without even thinking, I can almost immediately feel my current state. You want your mind back to perspective before putting down some numbers, then I would suggest a self-inquiry questionnaire ...


1

I'd stay away from any gadgets since they tend to become boring & complex. These would refrain you from measuring. Instead, I'd recommend to choose something easy that requires your body and energy only, like: Counting the # of squats you can do in 10 seconds. Its very important not to move away from the 10 sec measurement since more time would make you ...


1

Unfortunately, I don't think there is a practically workable solution on the market for measuring drowsiness in an office environment. However, the required technology does exist today. Some cars use facial recognition software, setting off an alarm if it concludes you should take a break. Parameters include slackening facial muscles, your blinking ...


1

There is a very thin layer between Ego and self respect , You are the solo judge for your acts , because at the end of the day you will take decision for yourself. Case 1: Defending your self is not wrong , but there is always ego to deny the truth , because we are not ready to except out mistake . Only you know whether you are wrong or not .Just evaluate ...


1

I don't think keystrokes are a good metric for productivity unless you are a typist. Having read through this, I don't think you even know how to define productive activities and unproductive activities. How productive you are is a balance between what you have to achieve and the time you are taking to achieve it.


1

I was coming here to firstly suggest manictime, as I used to use this and it is a good all around tracking program. However, this was overkill and I too only wanted to know my active hours, so ditched it for KeyStrokes. This is a lightweight option which tracks keyboard usage over the day: Keystrokes Homepage. The only downside is that it does not track ...


1

For the subjective variables like productivity and mood - as I recall from some unrelated psychology research, a good way of getting an unbiased reading of various variables throughout the day from one person is to have a small device (Android phone?) set up to ping at random times (however many times you want - once or twice a day should be fine for you) ...


1

I've tried a few approaches - maybe they'll give you ideas… For a while I did a regular analsis of my browsing history to show how much time I was wasting… all it took was firefox and a very small bit of excel fu and you could do this sort of thing… (apologies for lack of tabs) > 01/03/2011 12/03/2011 22/03/2011 27/03/2011 > Youtbue ...



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