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7

I was quite curious about this and did some research before, but I don't recall where my best sources were. But from what I've read (from various sources over the last few months), it generally doesn't work well with high level comprehension. Some quick source to back it up: LifeHacker, which goes into different types of speed reading and the methods of ...


5

Practice and concentration. It's that simple. Of course, making sure you have no distractions, having good lighting on the page, choosing topics that are interesting to begin with etc. are useful, but to be honest, if you have an exam coming up soon and you haven't yet developed reading comprehension, you don't have much chance of developing this much in ...


3

After you survey what you're going to read, you'll have something you want to ask. The best place to start is to ask yourself why you're reading it. Then ask yourself why this subject even matters. When you go with these two questions, you should be able to see what are some things you should ask. Some examples are "why is this method better than other ...


3

Personal Technical Reading If your intention is to learn ceaselessly without direction or goal then I will make the assumption that you are reading for personal interest. With speed-reading you will sacrifice depth of the knowledge in your haste, but maybe this is what you are going for. My personal opinion is to never do this: if it's worth reading about, ...


2

I would agree with Gruber, that from my personal experiences I have found that many TCS books (especially the ones they recommend in school) can be embarrassingly bad and unuseful. I would take his suggestion and try to look for better books on whatever subject you are studying. Try Amazon. In terms of reading these books in a more productive way, I can ...


1

The simple answer here is: PRACTICE Read everything you can, and note down any words you don't understand and look them up in a dictionary or thesaurus. Once you gain speed, you should not need to read by moving your eyes to each word, but instead comprehend groups of words, sentences or even paragraphs at once. Reading from a computer by moving a mouse ...


1

The best way for me to ensure I keep reading technical books is to use Jerry Seinfeld's "Don't break the chain" concept. Have a calendar and decide on something you want to do every day. Put a big red X in each day that you do it and try not to go a day without doing it. There are a number of habit forming apps like coach.me to help record this but the best ...


1

I suppose you mean kind of scientific article since you mention numbers, charts, headings, etc. Or at least follow the same structure. I used to had the same problem when I was reading a significant amount of them for my thesis. The problem here is (correct me if I'm wrong) [description of my experience]: Grab the article, you pay attention to the ...


1

Have very short breaks after reading few pages. You can write a short summary or try to draw a quick memory map during this period and then continue your reading. The notes / memory maps can be later used for revising the material.


1

imho, the best way is to start using new information right away - perhaps, by doing your own pet project


1

Most technical books have filler. Read the filler as fast as you can, and don't worry about whether or not you are comprehending it. If there is anything interesting, mark it quickly and move on. You can get through a page of fluff in a second this way. You can still read the non-filler fairly quickly. When you come across a fact you don't know, mark it and ...


1

Have a look at spreeder.com . It's a place to learn not to 'read out loud' in your mind by flashing words really quickly instead of letting you read them on your own. I think you can you can apply this concept to numbers as well. Try flashing some numbers (you could do it on paper) and compute some function of them (pick any. Start with something like a ...



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