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12

While I don't have day+ breaks when reading, I do have them when writing/blogging/coding/etc. I find something that helps is to leave myself some context as to what was going on. I think this could help you with reading. You don't need a summary of each chapter; you need a way to get back in quickly. I'm thinking when you feel you are about to take a ...


10

While some of these are well respected books, reading them will not change anything you do...practicing the techniques described in them will. So don't read them all at once. Read one, extract the techniques that work for you. Practice them and embed them in your daily routines and mental toolset. Then go on to the next book if needed. And sometimes a ...


9

This is nearly impossible, and what you need to do is remove all distractions and start reading. Practical: If you need a computer unplug the cable or turn off the wifi - don't allow yourself to procrastinate outside your scheduled procrastination time Every 60 minutes take a 15 minute break - procrastinate - it's useless to push your brain too hard ...


8

I recommend making a visual map of the key concepts in the text while you read it. This is not only good for understanding the material in the first place, but it will also quickly remind you of the concepts involved and the structure/relationships between them. One free mapping software that I like is Xmind.


7

First, I'd avoid thoughts like "clear up," "catch up," or "finish." The actual problem is not really about the pile growing; it's about no reading is happening. Even the pile grows by 50 pages a day, as long as you can read 10 pages a day, you're still gaining some new knowledge or information. This is what I usually do with my reading tasks: When a ...


7

Been there, and after twenty years, I am still there actually :) A bit of Zen wisdom might lighten the pain: most knowledge that are not technical comes from within. If one can understand and accept that, one gets less stressed about the number of books that are waiting to be read. Remember that books are books, and some tips that make sense, are not ...


6

Research has shown that we remember things best by spaced repetition. My grandfather summarized it when talking about an oil finish on wood: daily for a week, weekly for a month, monthly for a year, yearly for life. The same kind of process (although perhaps with different intervals) is what works for people's memories, too. See Wikipedia on spaced ...


5

it's important to not attach negative connections to the noise (I know, it is negative). So when the noise happens don't tut, don't get frustrated. This teaches your brain that it isn't actually important, therefore you won't be 'notified' of the noise when it happens and, because you've paid it no attention it will become background noise. This is ...


3

I can't take credit for this idea but I read it on lifehacker a while ago and liked the idea so much I adopted it for all of my books (especially technical books). I can't find the original post but here is the slightly modified system I've adopted. Thanks Julian! When you start a new book: Take a piece of paper and write the Book title, author and date ...


3

In addition to my comment above (i.e, find the "perfect" place and be mindful of how well you can do for 30 minutes as a benchmark) here is something that helps me with very technical and conceptual material. Your problem sounds like a problem I used to have and sometimes still have. What I do works for me but I don't know about you or anyone else. Decide ...


3

If you've got the time and energy to try and learn a concentration technique then all power to you - I'll leave possible techniques to others to describe. On the other hand, if you want a quick win, I'd try White Noise again. With a reasonably inexpensive pair of over-the-ear headphones you can turn the volume up quite loud without bothering other people. ...


3

The good: I try to read as much as possible - I would like to understand the world, as ongoing learning, as professional and personal development, just because I like it. The bad: I am a slow reader, I don't like speed reading because I want to concepts and topics to sink in and I like to understand them and visualize. Which means it takes me a ...


3

It sounds like the simplest solution would be to print the papers out and read them away from the computer. You might also consider using a somewhat formal technique for "notes." I usually take a minimum of two passes through a paper: Print it out and read through relatively quickly, making simple notes and annotations of important things to come back to, ...


3

Personally I find self-help books to be like religious texts. There are very good reasons why many Christians advocate daily Bible reading. The great things that you can take from a text will not stick forever and what you can get out of a text now will be different from what you can get from it later. If you find the reading of self-help texts to be useful, ...


3

Alas, it is not impossible! Check out Spreeder. This web app speeds up the process of reading by placing the words in the exact same location so your eyes never have to move. I tried this yesterday and I was able to blaze through nonfiction material. It lets you set the words-per-minute that you can read. I started out at 220wpm and I am up to about ...


3

If you read the article on incremental reading on the SuperMemo website, it explains incrementally as more of a reading management method. Basically, humans are very bad at objectively determining the immediate value of anything they're considering, so it is easy to get in overinflated sense of value when reading any book, article, etc. incremental reading ...


2

I'm afraid that my experience is that the 10,000 hour rule holds true for reading. Getting something you already want to read and getting started is likely the best way to improve speed and comprehension. When you need to read something that holds no intrinsic interest for you, the skills you developed reading stuff you enjoy will often be transferable. ...


2

From my experience, e-ink devices e.g. Kindle and PocketBook BOOX (9 in screen) are (much) more comfortable to the eyes than LCD or tablet screen, possibly because it does not produce light. However the software running the e-ink devices (so far) have much less functionality and speed than the software running the tablet and computer devices. This is great ...


2

Stepping away from the computer with a hard-copy is my own personal preference. Although, as someone who is easily distracted, I find it best to turn off the computer, leave all my gadgets behind, and (on a nice day) sit outside with nothing to distract me from the documents I have to read. By keeping the distractions out of sight, we are less likely to be ...


2

Check this link. I am surprised to find that there are computer programs to help read fast. Good tips are mentioned there. Some of tips I find very much helpful are: Talk about what you've read. Some readers find that by talking about their reading with friends or fellow students, they are able to effectively synthesize the material. Use a pacer like a pen ...


2

As people above have said, print it out and read away from the pc. Multiple readthroughs is also a must-have with increasing depth of detail, but I'd also add an extra readthrough where you skim for information contributing to something you don't understand for when you're trying to get the hard concept. Once you've done the skim, you should hopefully ...


2

Have you tried the Pomodoro Technique? Some people find that limiting your next bout of activity to 25 minutes (with a timer) allows the mind to relax and just focus on the current task. Knowing that you only have to stay with it for 25 minutes makes it much easier to focus. There are several good (free or cheap) pomodoro timer apps for phones, tablets, ...


2

My recipe is simple. I always read two books simultaneously. I have divided my day into two parts: morning and evening reading. In the morning (while going to work by bus) I read a professional book, while in the evening I read fiction or documentaries. At the weekend I read mostly articles, both professional and hobbystic - by the priority.


2

There are several avenues that could we worth exploring: Reconsider Your Overall Goal You said, "my overall goal is to be a well-rounded knowledgeable person...". To be honest, I'm not persuaded that this is a worthwhile goal - or even a meaningful one. The truth is, nobody is ever really "well-rounded". We all have our areas of knowledge and areas of ...


2

Think visually: Textual information, theoretical subjects, and thick books always make me sleep. So I makes diagram, mindmaps usually. So I can remember them for a long time with good efficiency. Relax mind: if your mind is not relaxed enough, your productivity will be decreased. So sleep for 6-7 hours, or may be 8 hours for you. Try to wake up early in ...


2

Don't forget that not reading your read/review pile results in more time that you can spend elsewhere. Before, you were probably reading reading those documents as they came in. Now, you are making the conscious decision that the document is not important enough to read now. By not reading them later, you are making the subconscious decision that they are ...


2

I don't think reading all of them at once will have any benefits. You will mostly forget what you read, and hardly apply all of the informations in these books. What you should do is to read one or two of them, and try to apply what you learned in your daily life. Give it between 10-14 days, because that is the time you can make a habit from it. Then ...


2

Some suggestions to improve your reading productivity: Focus on extracting value from books rather than the number of books you read. Be exceptionally choosy about the books you read. Read only the parts that are most valuable. Read only a summary of the book (the most popular books have numerous summaries online). Take a book everywhere you go. Consider ...


1

1)daily do exercise it energises you mind and body. 2)daily do meditation so your mind stays clutter free and improves your soft skills such as will power,concentration etc.. 3)daily allot some time for socialising and having fun with friends so that you won't feel that you miss something. 4)think about all your curricular and extra curricular activities ...



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