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16

There are imo 5 things one has to differ concerning paper managment: Redundancy because of plagiarism in distinct scientific branches there is the possibility you waste time reading the same informatin in different papers several times (bigger problem in humanities than natural sciences) focus on some tools like zotero, citeulike, mendeley, scirate that ...


12

This is all because of the interest level my friend. we can all remember the pretty girl's name but will forget the guy's name standing just beside her in a day. this is purely due to the interest and focus factor (we may also recall every word she says because the focus was pinpoint, we didn't rote her words in our mind) Secondly the girls name will began ...


10

I had the same problem as you and here's how I solved my problem. Bear in mind that while this worked for me, it's not a "one size fits all" situation. Clean your subscriptions removed most of my feeds kept the ones from authors with really great content, which I read 90% of the time kept work-related feeds (security updates, partners feeds, competitors ...


7

I have found this paper about the "three pass approach" very helpful. A summary: First pass (about 10 minutes): carefully read title, abstract and introduction read (sub)section headings read the conclusion glance over the references Second pass (about an hour) read more carefully (ignoring details such as proofs) look carefully at figures and ...


6

Cleaning out any feeds with a low signal-to-noise ratio and relying more heavily on curated sources is excellent advice that should reduce the number of feed items overall and decrease the volume of uninteresting content. Given that you've done all of that, the remaining improvements are going to be in workflow and how you interact with your reader. My ...


6

It's very simple. Never, EVER close your RSS client without marking all as unread read. So, you either open everything up in new windows, instapaper what you really wanna read or you don't open up your RSS client at all. This encourages discipline in estimating time available and drilling down to what you should effectively spend your time on. It's a ...


5

Are you getting enough (uninterrupted) sleep? Everything you learn is stored in short term memory. Sleep is used for memory optimization and storing it into long term memory. That said, with a lot of skills, like sports, musical instruments, or math, there is a long period of time where you can put in a lot of effort and never seem to improve. You'll have ...


4

It sounds like your short term memory works just fine, but you aren't using your long term memory. The generally accepted method for retention of new information (ie moving from short term memory to long term memory) is to review the day's experiences at end of day (ideally through writing notes and descriptions) followed up by a higher level review at end ...


4

I've found Zite for iPhone/iPad very useful, especially when I accumulate more than 1K unread items in Google Reader. It gives you personalized magazine with topics you're interested in based on how you rate them, but the important thing is that it can use unread feeds from Google Reader as one of the sources.


3

I think voice notes and text notes serve different purposes; they are useful in different situations. Text notes are what I prefer for simple facts I need to remember, when it's clear what the information is, and how I want to preserve it. For example "don't forget to buy eggs" or "remember to email George about the report" aren't things I would put in a ...


3

Try out offline readers like Instapaper or ReadItLater. This helps in multiple ways While reading the RSS feeds, you can have a quick decision on whether you want to read the whole article later at leisure, or do you think the summary itself is good enough for you to mark it as read. This allows you to work in two modes - the accumulation mode where you ...


3

Use Twitter to follow people who tweet good links instead of subscribing to RSS feeds. You could use instapaper or just email yourself the link to read later if a link is interesting. Remember that You don't have to read everything. Important stuff will be mentioned by multiple sources and tend to come back more than once.


2

Recommendations. Either by a digg-like site featuring rating and sharing or by someone else working in the same area of expertise as you, getting recommendations can save the time you'd spend browsing through a list of papers' descriptions. I'm not sure if the first option exists I've been looking for it in the last few days and this answer will be updated ...


2

I have been using Good Noows for my personal use.. It has a list of popular RSS sorted by categories and you can select which RSS you want to view or not. You can also create your own categories. I have created "My feeds" and added some frequents websites I visit daily. It also allows you to view the content in various different layouts suitable for you. ...


2

All these answers are workarounds but don't really adress the question that was posed. There's no real way to stop your RSS feeds from becoming a mess and there's no real way to stop information overload. Filtering tools slow this down but aren't enough. You can do your best to pare your feeds or followers but at the end of the day info overload is a symptom ...


2

Your focus is on search. It can be much more productive to ask a question. The SO functionality to detect duplicate questions works quite well and I often find answers there. Explain the problem that you are trying to solve rather than asking how to do X. Then you get the benefit of the creativity of those answering the questions.


1

Whenever I learn a concept ( maths, computers physics ). If I am required to solve a question on it ( immediately ), I do it without any problem. IMHO, this sequence is wrong If you would try to solve the question first (on your own), spending some time and effort and only then given that concept, you would value it much more and will remember it ...


1

There are many great answers, let me add yet another approach that help me keeping subscribed to 2,700 feeds without too much distractions reading. A bit of philosophy. First, you'll never read everything. Secondly, feeds are different by their nature. For some of them, nothing happens if you miss any post (or all). Others are critical. Third, in different ...


1

You already mentioned the pros and cons. Evernote, Tiddlywiki and Co. are esp. useful to structure, tag, search a knowledge base. Voice notes don't fit here. They represent mostly no real knowledge. Often you use voice notes for recording ideas and concepts resulting from brainstorming longer than 30 seconds or short discussions in a group or via phone. ...


1

For introducing yourself into a new topic: I found today the pretty useful tag-synonyms feature on StackExchange. Say you want to learn Javascript programming, there are alot of Q&A on different "Trilogy" SE sites. So a good start would be to look up the correct Javascript tag-synonym on this list yielding ...


1

I use Yahoo Pipes to filter some feeds where only 1% of the content interests me (eg Job Boards) and group my feeds by category (or moods) in Google Reader. Then when the mood takes me I just browse through a category such as "Tech" with the scroll wheel and middle click articles that look interesting into other browser tabs. I'm essentially using Google ...


1

Many people just skim the paper and read the conclusion first to have an overall idea about the value of the paper. Learning speed reading can also help :)



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