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16

There are imo 5 things one has to differ concerning paper managment: Redundancy because of plagiarism in distinct scientific branches there is the possibility you waste time reading the same informatin in different papers several times (bigger problem in humanities than natural sciences) focus on some tools like zotero, citeulike, mendeley, scirate that ...


11

According to research done at Bell Labs, there is no correlation between intelligence and productivity. Based on a wide range of cognitive and social measures, from standard tests for IQ to personality inventories, there’s little meaningful difference in the innate abilities of star performers and average workers. Rather, the real differences turn ...


7

Getting Things Done: The Science behind Stress-Free Productivity


6

I have found this paper about the "three pass approach" very helpful. A summary: First pass (about 10 minutes): carefully read title, abstract and introduction read (sub)section headings read the conclusion glance over the references Second pass (about an hour) read more carefully (ignoring details such as proofs) look carefully at figures and ...


5

This is why brainstorming or 'blue sky thinking' can be very useful when trying to break out of a rut. Instead of analysing a possible solution, these techniques encourage you to write down many ideas - without being judgemental, so no calling out a specific idea as silly or unworkable - just write them all down and then go back and review each one. This ...


4

Wow, this article answers this question exactly! http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/04/brain-games-are-bogus.html


4

Some years ago I read that one standard deviation in IQ (~15 IQ points) increased productivity by 1.6 times. For the last 5 years I've been trying to find this source and would greatly appreciate a referral to it. While I'm sure attitudes and other "social" factors affect productivity of the more intelligent person, the same can be said for the less ...


4

I may have found some weak evidence that they are negatively correlated. IE. intelligent people are maybe less productive if career success is used as a proxy for productivity. First Conscientiousness is negatively correlated with intelligence: Recent studies have also observed that intelligence is negatively correlated with Conscientiousness ...


4

I do consulting during the day, and run an online business on the side (evenings and weekend) and I learned a few things to help me get enough energy in the evenings: I play video games for 30 minutes, or watch a tv series: as counter intuitive as it seems, video games will give you an adrenaline kick that will refresh you. I noticed that tv series with ...


3

As you'll see in my comment to proton, I think that this can be very different depending on your personality and the things that trigger a productive response in you. For me, one of the keys is a clear head, and a fairly popular technique for head-clearing is mindfulness meditation. This is a pretty simple tactic, and there's a good tool for it: calm.com. ...


3

I think you'll have to find a way to enjoy your research. I remember reading a blog post by a programmer who'd wake up at 5am everyday to code for two hours. He wrote - Enjoying the work is key It's 5am and I will be also putting in a full day's work afterwards. Not being stressed out or frustrated during this time is essential. I ensure this by ...


3

I've used Lumosity for more than two years. I've noticed that 15-20 minutes of Lumosity first thing in the morning does an excellent job of warming up my brain for the challenges of the day. I've also found that after prolonged work that 15 minutes of L can enable you to go back to your work refreshed. In addition, after a little poking around the ...


3

I'm from Lumosity. If you're interested in the science behind our games check out our blog. We post all new research and any peer reviewed studies involving our games there.


3

Searching This seems like a good ratio. You can however try to improve your search to get more chances to find what you're searching for. Create an organized list of search material to refer to when you need something. When you run in an intersting site with good references, mark it down in your favorites or in a file. Do the same with a book. Some are ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


2

Recommendations. Either by a digg-like site featuring rating and sharing or by someone else working in the same area of expertise as you, getting recommendations can save the time you'd spend browsing through a list of papers' descriptions. I'm not sure if the first option exists I've been looking for it in the last few days and this answer will be updated ...


2

Your focus is on search. It can be much more productive to ask a question. The SO functionality to detect duplicate questions works quite well and I often find answers there. Explain the problem that you are trying to solve rather than asking how to do X. Then you get the benefit of the creativity of those answering the questions.


2

If you want to manage your job and your degree, don't worry about being sick of them, but put in the effort until you have achieved your goal-which in this case is going to be gaining your degree. If you are only working 10-7 five days a week you have lots of spare time. What are you currently doing with it? Many of the teams I have worked in have used > ...


2

From my own perspective I know that a good workout in the gym makes my entire perspective on the day perk up. It works for me like a coffee works for others. I feel like my body has achieved something, and this relates directly to my mind/personality achieving something that day. I feel confident, fit and generally happy. My diagnosis is endorphins are ...


2

I've been doing this for several months now (working fulltime and doing masters research/thesis writing). My suggestions: Figure out when your brain is at an "optimal" level. Some people it's 5am. Some people it's 10pm. Figure this out, because you are going to need to know this. Not all hours are created equal and when you lose a bunch every week to ...


2

I put research materials into Evernote. The Windows, iOS and Android apps have an integrated PDF reader, so I can read documents wherever I am. I pay for a pro account, so I can have access on handheld devices when I'm offline. Depending on what project the material is for I use different notebooks or tagging to track what has and hasn't been read. For ...


2

Mendeley is a free alternative to Evernote (but they also have a Pro plan for more features). You can install its client application and use it independently of a Mendeley online account (I did so about a year ago - Things might have changed now). It has fairly good PDF management features. I noticed Mendeley website is becoming like a social media where ...


2

I use citeulike, a free alternative of Mendeley. It's web based, and you can upload your personal PDF's. It manages your papers, priority for reading, notes, tags, BibTeX export, etc. Their bookmarklet allows you to export information from journal websites directly (or if you have access to DOI, it accesses databases for you). Personally, I put papers that ...


2

I would suggest using Zotero, I created a Zotero folder "to-read" to pile up the pending papers. You can assign existing properties or make new ones to each individual paper like "PagesRead", "Related Paper", "Tags", "Notes" etc. I have tried Mendeley and many other tools but Zotero stands out to be the best for managing research papers.


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


1

Depending on what you're brainstorming about, you might do it differently, but here's some stuff that should work regardless Brainstorming Guidelines: Use a pen, markers, whiteboards, sticky notes etc. Digital mediums create constraints, and you only want productive constraints when brainstorming. There are no bad ideas, don't judge anybody, write them ...


1

Personally I know when I'm going to have relatively free time at work. Suppose you have task with deadline at 11am. Very often deadlines are estimated including some extra time. If you will manage to do work at 10am then you will have one extra time for self-study. Also you can estimate tasks to a larger scale, again to have that free time, but that all ...


1

I can feel confident. I'm not sure I can feel productive without accomplishment. I'm listing my tasks in my notebook and strike out tasks that I have done knowing that while writing a task down, I commit to do it and striking it out motivates myself that I'm productive (these are part of pomodoro technique) . I heard that when we spin down (feel not ...


1

I don't have a complete answer for you, but some snippets around Evernote may be of some use. Evernote keeps a revision history, although you can't get at it unless you're a paid subscriber. It works very well. There is an add-on for Evernote that allows you to design templates for your notes. I've only read about it, I have no experience with it, but it ...


1

As weronika pointed out, I found that HLGEM came up with an answer on the other related question, which could have been a good one on this topic. It's something along the line of : Case 1. It's a one time project and you already know how it can be done (albeit slowly) : just get it done. Case 2. Your project will be repeated : decide case-by ...



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