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I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


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I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


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Heres some a great answer provided by (AsapScience) "When looking at the effectiveness of learning, laptops as tools for note-taking do not fair as well as plain-old pen and paper, a study has suggested. Why? Typing is faster than writing on paper, so students are more likely to just type what they're listening to word for word without interpreting. " ...


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Similar to Kramii's outliner idea I'd suggest to use a mindmap to collect and sort the information. Freeplane (http://freeplane.sourceforge.net/ ) for example is a free tool which lets you do that and much more. Collect all information - one "atomar" information per node (not more). Then you can rearrange the nodes (Kramii already gave some very good ...


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One way would be to use an outliner (or Word in Outline mode). The crude approach would be to: Enter the information as-is without trying to weed through it or organise it at all. Group similar information together. Simply delete things you're not interested in. Organise sections into some kind of structure. Summarise each section. If you've made the ...



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