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131

After reading this article by Steve Pavlina (his early stuff is really good) and experimenting a bit, I consistently wake up at 5 AM by programming only one task into my head: Get up from the bed and GO. I forbid myself from having any other thoughts when I wake up, because I know I'll convince myself -with very strong, logical and solid arguments- to go ...


53

There was a study in 2009 that showed that Early Risers Crash Faster Than People Who Stay Up Late. From the article: Researchers Christina Schmidt and Philippe Peigneux and their colleagues first asked 16 extreme early risers and 15 extreme night owls to spend a week following their natural sleep schedule. Then subjects spent two nights in a sleep lab, ...


51

It will adjust until it can't anymore. Then your body will say, "OK, enough," and you'll fall asleep, right there, barreling down the highway at 65 MPH. You'll get a lot less done if you're dead.


50

Here's my bedtime routine that works really well Install F.lux - Seriously just do it. Get ~7-9 of night time hours a night. So for example if sunrise is at 6am, then sleeping from 2am -> 10am is 8 total hours but it's only 4 night time hours. Sleeping at night is a big deal. Do at least one physical activity a day. If you are sedentary all day your sleep ...


40

Based on your description, the premise of Uberman's Sleep schedule seems to be based on a belief that REM is the only useful stage of sleep and thus maximizing REM gets all the benefits of sleep in less time. This sleep article on WebMD explains how both REM and deep sleep provide benefits. Specifically on the benefits of non-REM (NREM) sleep: During ...


40

15 reasons of fatigue are: Not Enough Sleep Sleep Apnea [2] Not Enough Fuel Anemia Depression Hypothyroidism Caffeine Overload Hidden UTI Diabetes Dehydration Heart Disease Shift Work Sleep Disorder Food Allergies Some doctors believe hidden food allergies can make you sleepy. If your fatigue intensifies after meals, you ...


38

Noting hurts productivity more than sleep deprivation. There is an awful lot of conclusive research on the effects of sleep deprivation on productivity (usually done by armies), the sleep deprived teams are always much slower, less focused and make substantially more mistakes, also the sleep deprived individuals don’t notice they are performing so badly. ...


36

I find that in these situations I'm usually fine once I actually get up and moving. So, here's what works for me: I make sure to get enough, high-quality sleep. I eat protein before bed. (Waking up with low blood sugar is not a good experience.) I schedule something I really look forward to first thing in the morning so I feel deep down that there's a ...


31

As others have said fatigue can have a lot of causes. But I'll outline some general things which I think most people would benefit from: Improving sleep quantity and quality. I recommend at least 8hours of sleep (for most people) and getting most of your sleep during night time. The latest you want to sleep is around 10-11pm in my experience, much earlier ...


30

Just leave all of your work area untouched in the evening and write down the ideas you were working on. When you come back you will be able to pick it up exactly how you left it off and instantly be productive. It is very important to write down what you were working on (sort of like a quick todo list) because it clears your conscious brain before sleep ...


25

I had the same problem a few weeks ago. I usually felt very tired in the morning and when I didn't have anything urgent to do I saw myself sleeping for too long. 3 weeks method It's said if you want to estabilish a routine for yourself, 3 weeks is the minimum time you have to repeat a given habit in order to make it feel natural. My sleeping problem was ...


22

One trick that I use that's specific to programming is to write new unit tests at the end of the day that will fail. These are easy to write so I can do it when I'm tired, and making those tests pass is a good starting point for the next day. I think you can adapt this to the general case by using a TODO list. Update your list at the end of the day with ...


19

Everybody is different. Listen to your body. I need 7 hrs; 8 is better. Sub-6 and I'll definitely be suboptimal. I know people who are fine on 4. As one gets older one generally needs less sleep. If you are constantly tired or sleepy, or don't feel like you're working at your full potential, try sleeping more. Animals (not just mammals, but almost all ...


18

Simple trick that works for me - put the alarm clock on the other side of the room, preferably in a high place. This forces me to get out of the warmth of the bed to turn the thing off. Getting up out of the bed also usually causes me to need to use the washroom. Once that starts going my brain kicks on somewhat. Having the snooze button RIGHT THERE is a ...


18

I did the Uberman schedule a year or so ago, and it was AMAZING!! I absolutely loved it, it was everything I had read about... time seemed to slow to a crawl, I felt better than ever, and I absolutely couldn't believe how many extra activities I was able to work on. However just like everyone else I've read about, I ended up going back to a mostly ...


18

Before sleeping just drink 2-3 glasses of water. It will wake up you early. I do this when I want to go somewhere early in the morning.


16

It can be very helpful to get things out of your mind and in to somewhere that you trust you'll see them later, so you can forget about it now. For me, that means keeping a pad and pencil next to the bed, and writing down anything that I keep thinking about instead of sleeping. The next morning, I take that list and transfer the notes to wherever I'll find ...


15

The single best effect I ever had on getting my 7 hours a night down to a comfortable 5 was by getting fit. It might sound like a time waster, but by running, swimming or going to the gym for an hour or two every other morning before work and training to a level where I could happily run marathons gave me an almost immediate increase in energy. Combining ...


14

Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise. -- Ben Franklin Go to bed earlier. When you wake up (under normal circumstances) you'll have had enough sleep. Take some time to learn what is a normal amount of sleep for you. If you discover it varies significantly from the "average" required amount of sleep, seek professional ...


14

Effective use of alarms Simple is often better so an alarm is for me the one tested and true method for waking up. That being said, there are some effective ways of using an alarm. The obvious one is to put the alarm device outside of reach so that you have to get up to turn it off. Perhaps even leave it in a different room, for example in the bathroom ...


13

I've often read the most important factor in sleeping is not so much how long you sleep but at which point during the sleep cycle you wake up. Ideally you should wake up during light sleep. In the picture above, REM and above, and stages 1 and 2 would be light sleep. Stages 3 and 4 would be deep sleep. Awakening from deep sleep can lead to sleep inertia ...


13

Similar to one of the other suggestions use a light. I have a separate table lamp on my nightstand with a low watt build (20w) plugged into a simple lamp timer. I have it set to 10 minutes before my radio alarm. With the lights on when the radio goes off it help to keep you awake. And with a low brightness bulb you won't wake anyone else. Focus on your wake ...


12

Actually, I would disagree. The biggest way to ensure good productivity is to be in physical condition to perform well, and that requires rest. Two "extra" hours in the morning aren't worth spending the day as a zombie. You may find however, that time spent alone either before people wake up (if you're a morning person) or after they've gone to be (if ...


12

This is what we call Chronotype, Clodoré et al. has also done research about alertness differences. Chronotype is an attribute of animals, including human beings, reflecting at what time of the day their physical functions (hormone level, body temperature, cognitive faculties, eating and sleeping) are active, change or reach a certain level. [..] ...


12

What you describe is called a light version of the Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome, I would suggest you to read up on this and what different solutions exist to make sure that you get rid of any Circadian Rhithm. Work on it while you still can, because DSPS can have a great impact on your social and work life. If you ever get so far that you're really stuck ...


12

The amount of sleep needed for a person seems to be very individual, so the absolute duration of your sleeping time (7 h) will be difficult to discuss here, IMHO. I recently read an article stating that the "built-in biorhythm" can not be changed, which is especially hard for people working in changing shifts. Concerning your 7 hours: "But I am always ...


11

Have you tried accountability? Find a partner who wants to wake up at the same time, and agree to try and call each other as close to the hour as possible. (6:00am or 6:01am). You may want to continue these calls every 15 minutes until you are both committed to being up and running.


11

On average 7~8 hours before they wake. If you set your alarm for 5 every morning and get up each day at 5, I guarantee that you are going to get really sleepy around 9~10PM. waking up early promotes going to bed early, not the other way around. When I was a kid, there were 3 TV channels with nothing that was worth watching after 11PM that stopped ...


10

Snooze is your enemy! Disable the snooze function on your alarm clock and then you don't trust yourself to wake up again. If you are able to wake up for specific things, then give yourself specific things to do - make appointments with friends, etc.



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