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7

The science is pretty persuasive and matches with my experience. I feel that I function better and come to alertness and become truly awake more quickly if I resist snoozing. That said, I've never set my snooze to longer than 10-15 minutes. If I can afford a 30 minute snooze I'd probably just set my alarm for 30 minutes later! I've also found that a better, ...


5

If you, like me, dont like to waste you time with sleep, I think you should try Polyphasic sleep. Polyphasic sleep involves taking multiple short sleep periods throughout the day instead of getting all your sleep in one long chunk. A popular form of polyphasic sleep, the Uberman sleep schedule, suggests that you sleep 20-30 minutes six times per ...


4

Practise going to bed and getting up at same hours until it becomes a habit, sleep well and long enough and don't rush it as your biological clock needs time to adjust. I know that motivation can help a lot but even biggest zealots would have trouble running before they learn how to walk. Getting up early is more difficult than staying up late. Start with ...


4

You have nailed it, discipline is not replaceable. Go to sleep before midnight. I am not sure how you got the idea that 2AM is the sleep onset time for you - it is just about time when most people's cortisol levels are starting to climb slowly, which means - the body is starting to get ready for the next day. Best go to sleep around 10 PM or other time ...


3

There are two solutions that come to mind, though neither of them are watches per se. Specifying a watch narrows the solution set. Jawbone UP. This device wraps around your wrist and keeps track of things like steps taken, exercise time, and sleep cycles. You can tell it to wake you up at a certain time, such as 6:30 AM, and a wake up range, such as 30 ...


2

I have not tried this, and not sure about battery life, but sounds like a fit otherwise: The SleepTracker Pro Elite Sleep Monitor from their amazon page: http://www.amazon.com/SleepTracker-Elite-Version-Sleep-Monitor/dp/B0026RHFPS/ref=pd_sbs_hpc_5 Digital watch monitors your sleep patterns to help you wake up feeling refreshed Monitors physical data and ...


2

Some days are better than others. Some days we find ourselves in a flow state for hours at a stretch getting incredible things done and other days we can't seem to get dressed without spilling our coffee, waking up the baby and stepping on the dog (who then barks and wakes up your spouse). You have to learn and accept that we can't be over-achieving ...


2

Your problem is that you are assumung that your sleeping time should be fixed (as @kramii). This is a very common mistake between people, you should understand that your sleeping time shouldn't be fixed: you should sleep only when you feel sleepy and wake up at the same time everyday. Doing this, your body will adapt to this style and you will achieve ...


2

Having struggled with something like this for years, I would advise my younger self to see a doctor sooner (if you can't solve it within a few weeks), and if he/she didn't understand the problem, try a different doctor until you find one who gets it. This kind of sleep schedule can be a symptom of clinical depression, but researchers are discovering that it ...


2

Force yourself to stay up. You are at 8-5, so gradually increase that to 10-7, then 12-9 until you're all the way back to a normal schedule. Naps are fine as long as your final sleep cycle ends up where it is supposed to be.


2

I recently made a great leap in my own war with the snooze button. I wish it had never been invented, but I have now proved to myself: NO SNOOZE If I get out of bed immediately I feel like crap for at least 5 minutes, but after that things seem bearable. ONE OR MORE SNOOZES Get up after a snooze and I will feel exactly as crap as above, for the same 5 ...


1

Personal experience suggests the decay is quite slow. Ie debt maintains at or near 100% for beyond 7 days. Again - if personal experience is any measure then I sense it also depends on age of the person also and possibly fitness level. I could skip a nights sleep without much effect when I was in my 20s but I'm a bit older now and I notice my ability ...


1

Well this answer might seem a bit trivial. But I got an alarm clock which has an propeller which just gets thrown away in some direction in the room. The alarm clock won't stop until you went up, took that propeller and putted it back on the alarm clock. That is pretty effective because you had to stand up and go and then bend over and grab the propeller. I ...


1

Set multiple alarm clocks to the same time, with high volumes, and spread them through the house. By the time you have turned them all off, you will be wide awake. Maybe place the last of them next to the coffee maker or to your desk - then the easiest course of action after you turn that one off is to get a coffee or sit down to work.


1

When I was 22 and just graduated from college I had the same idea as you do now. As a workaholic who's passionate about his work (software development) and very determined about his goal, I would keep working until late night and get up very early. The average sleep I got was about 5 hours per day, EVERYDAY, for 5 years, even on weekends. There's always so ...


1

Getting sick is indeed a blow to your productivity. There's not much you can do when you've caught a cold. The best thing you can do is to avoid getting sick in the future: Wash your hands often to clear away all those viruses and bacteria Keep your fingers away from your nose, eyes, mouth Avoid public transportation, best thing is to walk or bicycle your ...


1

I don't notice a major difference if I snooze (heavily) or not. And yes, I have been a heavy user. The fact of snoozing is not a component that determines the quality of my day. What however does impact my day is the snooze duration. Opportunity cost. I think you have to reconsider why you want to snooze anyway? Answer: a lack of sleep and/or an unnatural ...


1

I put a set limit on my maximum work time. It's 12 Pomodoros/day for me, 40 Pomodoros/week, with 8 Pomodoros/week dedicated to training (reading books, doing courses, practicing). Write a report on what you spent that time on. The training bit really helps in the long run. With white collar work, you'll find that you're only really working 200 minutes out ...


1

From personal experience, I don't notice a negative difference. If anything, I feel more ready to wake up after using snooze for another 30 minutes of precious sleep. I've never done it for more than that, though, so maybe there is a time limit before reaching the negative effect zone? Perhaps max 30 minutes allows you to stay in the Power nap area, instead ...


1

In my personal case, go to bed at fixed time point everyday does not work for me at all. So I have developed another strategy that I thought worth sharing: Instead of going to bed at fixed point (e.g 2am), I would wake up at fixed time point (e.g 6 am). By doing that I can easily adjust to my situation everyday. For example sometimes I had a really busy day ...


1

Your case might be special - it's possible that you're one of the lucky few who can sleep very little without suffering from cognitive or emotional issues. That aside, it seems that the difficulty you have in going to sleep at a regular time is related to an impulsive desire to stay up and get stuff done. A few things that would help counteract this ...


1

Most likely you have yet normally functioning circadian rhythm. There is circadian rhythm in your body/brain regulated by hormones like serotonin and melatonin. Also there is some special cells on human retina, regulating this rhythm. Even small amount of day light enough to change phase of the rhythm. You can find more information about this topic in the ...



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