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15

What would you say if I said, "I just can't go without oxygen! I've met people who are still holding their breath at 12:00, but when I start holding my breath at 11:00, I just can't make it to 11:02, let alone 12:00. What can I do?" I suggest you'd tell me not to be so silly (or something more colourful that means the same thing). The truth is, you need ...


11

Is being an early riser AND going out on weekends possible? Yes. That is, according to Personal Development blogger Steve Pavlina, who has posted a highly popular article on How to Become an Early Riser. In the followup Part II he writes (in the context of having the locked-in habit of regularly getting up at the same early time): You can always ...


9

The answer here is really simple, if you ask me: If you feel that you can solve the problem or if you are in the right "mood" you must keep going because that state is hard then to replicate in the future. If you struggle with a problem and can't come up with a solution, the best thing, at least for me, is to sleep over it. The new day brings me new ways ...


9

Your current scheme is no good. Despite what you say about having to stay up late, try going to bed before your night alertness kicks in, because then it's often too late to fall asleep given that you are a night person. Then go up earlier, perhaps 5:30 AM, to finish the things you should've done the previous evening. And to facilitate falling asleep, avoid ...


6

To quote myself: How to fall asleep Sleep in a cool room (slightly leaning to cold!) Take a warm shower before sleep Play some calming music (classical) Pull the blanket only until your knees (= upper body without any cover) Wear very warm socks (wool socks) Do something calming just before sleep (read a book for 30 mins in bed) Eat a little bit of sugar-y ...


6

The science is pretty persuasive and matches with my experience. I feel that I function better and come to alertness and become truly awake more quickly if I resist snoozing. That said, I've never set my snooze to longer than 10-15 minutes. If I can afford a 30 minute snooze I'd probably just set my alarm for 30 minutes later! I've also found that a better, ...


6

Well,these cannot substitute of a sturdy sleep. At least would keep you conscious as well. -Making strech or exercises that keep your blood alive. Also pay attention to in-working posture. -Massaging your head and ears for same blood thing. -Eating balanced, not much or less. -Drinking plenty of water. -Washing your face regularly. -Taking breath ...


5

Don't get an alarm clock with a snooze function. Get a loud alarm clock that requires you to get out of bed to turn it off, and never get back into your bed once up. Even at weekends - start to train yourself that up is up. Go to bed earlier. If you need 8 hours and need to be up at 7, get to bed by 10 aiming to be asleep by 11. Avoid working on a computer ...


5

I've been doing polyphasic sleeping for almost one year (Everyman with two naps, but I am thinking about switching to biphasic sleeping since it seems more natural). Here is what you could do (supposing you want to try the "standard" biphasic with 6-hours core sleep and one 20-minutes day nap): Know your the length of your own sleep cycle. 1.1 Take a ...


5

When it comes to Polyphasic sleep I know of no better reference than my favorite alternative lifestyle guy, Steve Pavlina. He tried a VERY extensive polyphasic sleep experiment a few years back and I am still itching to try it due to the success he had but life around me is not working that way. You can see/learn everything you need to know about it here: ...


5

I experimented with polyphasic sleep a few years ago and from that I have retained the ability to fall asleep quickly pretty much anywhere. My best trick is to pretend to be in REM sleep: Find a comfortable position to sleep in, close your eyes and squint slightly while looking upwards, basically trying to look at the bridge of your nose. This should not ...


5

If you, like me, dont like to waste you time with sleep, I think you should try Polyphasic sleep. Polyphasic sleep involves taking multiple short sleep periods throughout the day instead of getting all your sleep in one long chunk. A popular form of polyphasic sleep, the Uberman sleep schedule, suggests that you sleep 20-30 minutes six times per ...


4

You get the problem because you've trained your mind so that it gives you a wake up whistle only when it comes to attending classes/tests, which means, according to your body, any other thing is not obligatory during that time period. So your brain figures "I don't have to do this, so let me just sleep for some more time!" and it makes you oversleep or turn ...


4

Optimize your Sleeping Time Sleep Cycles: Respect your sleep cycles and Find out the best times for your to go to sleep and wake up. Intelligent Clocks: Consider using an alarm clock that respects your sleep stages. Some exist as traditional desk/nightstand clocks using sensors, but you can also install apps on a smartphone using either sensors or the ...


4

You are not sleeping 'late' - many consider 8 hours to be appropriate for the majority of the human race. It would be late if you we sleeping from midnight to midday...You are only time-shifted. So as regards your question on detoxing - it is irrelevant. If you want to sleep from midnight to 8am, this becomes a relatively simple problem of managing your ...


3

There is no use attaching any tags and names to this behaviour. If you are asking this to decide, should you blame yourself or not - don't blame yourself no matter how you call it. More constructive questions is: "Does this behaviour indicate anything? If yes, should you do something about it?" First, why you suddenly decide to go to sleep? Maybe it's time ...


3

Why don't you study programming in a public place such as a library or an internet cafe? It's tempting to relax and goof off at home when the bed, tv, refrigerator, video game console, couch, etc is within an arm's reach. If you study in a public place, you will be forced to keep yourself alert and study since there is nothing else to do if you have only ...


3

There are many techniques you can employ as stated in the other answers, but the main reason is: THERE IS NO SIGNIFICANT REWARD OR PUNISHMENT FOR YOUR BEHAVIOR! If someone offers you a million bucks to get up at 7am, or if the boss threatens to fire you if get late one more time, then 99% of the time you will force yourself to wake up! Regardless of what ...


3

The thing I have realized is my levels of rest and sleep depend on too many things other than just the sleeping time. Here are my experiences. You have to ask yourself, what kind of tiredness do I have to take care of? Physical Mental Emotional At times when you are having a great time with friends, family on an event or party or day/ night out ...


3

You have nailed it, discipline is not replaceable. Go to sleep before midnight. I am not sure how you got the idea that 2AM is the sleep onset time for you - it is just about time when most people's cortisol levels are starting to climb slowly, which means - the body is starting to get ready for the next day. Best go to sleep around 10 PM or other time ...


2

I have recently started using a polyphasic sleep schedule (6 hour core sleep with a 20 min nap). To do this, I basically just started taking a nap in the middle of the day when I was able and then going to bed later. After a few days of this, I found that I wanted to go to bed for my core sleep earlier rather than later and so I allowed myself to do that, ...


2

Cheking up your profile shows that you are 21 and student. I am just few years older but when I was 21 it was the same for me, in weekends I could easily pull 10 to 12 hours, and when I had to wake up in the morning to go to university at 6 or 7 a.m. it was painfull. Now I am working and I have really consistent life (not like when I was student), I got ...


2

Before the industrial revolution people actually didn't sleep in one 8 hour block. Historical research has shown that people actually slept over a 10 hour period but in two phases. They would go to bed much earlier and sleep in a 4 hour block and then by up for a couple hours before going into 'second sleep'. In a study by Thomas Wehr, he had volunteers ...


2

The body does most of its recuperating during the REM phase of the sleep cycle. Our usual sleep cycle consists of a 6-8 hour stretch with a small REM phase in between. We actually need just about 2-3 hours of REM sleep everyday. Alternative sleep cycles take advantage of this and are based around getting into, and out of, REM sleep quickly and much faster ...


2

When you say "oversleep", do you sleep through your alarm? Hit snooze too much? Switch it off and go back to bed? Assuming you're using an alarm clock there are a few ways to deal with not getting up in the morning when you should. A good idea is to put the alarm out of reach so you have to get out of bed to turn it off. If you're not using an alarm clock ...


2

I read 2 kinds of studies related to sleep and productivity: People staying in total darkness for a few weeks: these studies showed that our natural sleeping cycles are not 8 hours every 24 hours, but 6 hours + a 30 min-1hour nap every 24 hours. It means we are built for having short naps: so whenever you can afford it, you should do it! At least it is ...


2

I recently made a great leap in my own war with the snooze button. I wish it had never been invented, but I have now proved to myself: NO SNOOZE If I get out of bed immediately I feel like crap for at least 5 minutes, but after that things seem bearable. ONE OR MORE SNOOZES Get up after a snooze and I will feel exactly as crap as above, for the same 5 ...


2

I believe that the latter is correct. It might be better to sleep 30 minutes more (or less sleep even) coming closer to a 90 minutes sleep cycle instead of dowsing on or off for 30 minutes. There are many apps that can help you calculate the 'correct' time to sleep. You can do this yourself easily though! As a rule of thumb you'd have to sleep in 90 ...


1

I make the decision this way: I will stay late (up as long as I am productive) if and only if I will be able to sleep until rested once I finally stop working. If I have to be at work at 8 am the next morning, I will not stay up until 4 am. If I can come in at noon, I will. The reason is simple. The productivity gained from working late almost never ...


1

It seems counterproductive because we like to think "hard work" is the same thing as spending time on a task. But it isn't. Search for why breaks are productive or the Pomodairo Technique to see why just ploughing ahead with something isn't the best approach. Whether it is time to sleep or just take a break or go for a walk, giving your brain a rest to ...



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