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7

The science is pretty persuasive and matches with my experience. I feel that I function better and come to alertness and become truly awake more quickly if I resist snoozing. That said, I've never set my snooze to longer than 10-15 minutes. If I can afford a 30 minute snooze I'd probably just set my alarm for 30 minutes later! I've also found that a better, ...


6

I also have an inability to function well in the morning. I don't think it is something that can be changed. It's just the way our bodies function. But, being aware of the problem allows you to adjust your behavior to compensate for the lack of productivity in the morning. Things that I have done to adjust: Get up right away with the first alarm. It ...


6

Well,these cannot substitute of a sturdy sleep. At least would keep you conscious as well. -Making strech or exercises that keep your blood alive. Also pay attention to in-working posture. -Massaging your head and ears for same blood thing. -Eating balanced, not much or less. -Drinking plenty of water. -Washing your face regularly. -Taking breath ...


5

The best quality sleep is aquired around 23:00. Being a late sleeper and not sleeping the full 8h it isn't strange at all that you are tired in the mornings. The plain answer is that you will have to start going to bed earlier, there are sadly no cut-arounds unless you can sleep in or arrive to your daily activities later in the day. Sleep your full 8 ...


5

If you, like me, dont like to waste you time with sleep, I think you should try Polyphasic sleep. Polyphasic sleep involves taking multiple short sleep periods throughout the day instead of getting all your sleep in one long chunk. A popular form of polyphasic sleep, the Uberman sleep schedule, suggests that you sleep 20-30 minutes six times per ...


4

You have nailed it, discipline is not replaceable. Go to sleep before midnight. I am not sure how you got the idea that 2AM is the sleep onset time for you - it is just about time when most people's cortisol levels are starting to climb slowly, which means - the body is starting to get ready for the next day. Best go to sleep around 10 PM or other time ...


3

I would aim at waking up the same time every day, including your 1:30 PM weeks and your weekends. Having free time before lunch is awesome. Waking up the same time every day is The ideal way of sleeping optimally. Have you taken every possible step towards being able to sleep as early as you need to get up when you need to? Go to be the same time every ...


3

When you wake up, do not do anything that is exciting or disturbs sleep: no eating, no Internet browsing. Reading might be OK if it is relaxing, so no super-exciting books or (study) books that require heavy attention. Set an alarm and get out of bed. No compromises. Go to a doctor to determine if you really have Shift Work Sleep Disorder. Self-diagnosing ...


2

I believe that the latter is correct. It might be better to sleep 30 minutes more (or less sleep even) coming closer to a 90 minutes sleep cycle instead of dowsing on or off for 30 minutes. There are many apps that can help you calculate the 'correct' time to sleep. You can do this yourself easily though! As a rule of thumb you'd have to sleep in 90 ...


2

You should not feel like this. It could be a health issue. Check with your doctor. I like to run because it stimulate my circulation and oxygenates my body. Better than coffee and I feel the effects throughout the day.


2

Your problem is that you are assumung that your sleeping time should be fixed (as @kramii). This is a very common mistake between people, you should understand that your sleeping time shouldn't be fixed: you should sleep only when you feel sleepy and wake up at the same time everyday. Doing this, your body will adapt to this style and you will achieve ...


2

Having struggled with something like this for years, I would advise my younger self to see a doctor sooner (if you can't solve it within a few weeks), and if he/she didn't understand the problem, try a different doctor until you find one who gets it. This kind of sleep schedule can be a symptom of clinical depression, but researchers are discovering that it ...


2

Force yourself to stay up. You are at 8-5, so gradually increase that to 10-7, then 12-9 until you're all the way back to a normal schedule. Naps are fine as long as your final sleep cycle ends up where it is supposed to be.


2

This is a brilliant question and one that nearly everyone puts up to one at one stage of life or the other. It may appear that that your work needs to have a higher purpose than what it currently serves. You mention that it's generating acceptable income for you to sustain but you lose the energy (read motivation) occasionally. The cue that you mention is ...


2

As I see it (and I'm no expert), there are two possibilities. Find a strong enough motivation to overcome your depressive mood. Unless you're in a catatonic state, there's a possibility you could find a strong enough incentive to actually propel you forward. It could range from "If I don't get up, those cute puppies will die" to "I swore an oath to make ...


2

You'll have to do some work to get some reliable results. Basically what you want to do is to find sleeping time that gives you the best alertness during the day. To find the ideal solution, I would use this algorithm: Assuming you're going to sleep for say 8 hours, determine the latest and the earlies window of time for you to sleep to get to work in ...


2

I recently made a great leap in my own war with the snooze button. I wish it had never been invented, but I have now proved to myself: NO SNOOZE If I get out of bed immediately I feel like crap for at least 5 minutes, but after that things seem bearable. ONE OR MORE SNOOZES Get up after a snooze and I will feel exactly as crap as above, for the same 5 ...


1

Does this happen every night? Does it happen just once per night or more? Seeing as you already know the sleep hygeine, there are a few other things you can consider: Do you remember your dreams at all? If the disturbances are caused by nightmares then you may be able to ease the problem by finding out if something causes the nightmares, particularly if ...


1

While you mention trying nearly every medication on the market, you didn't state if this was all through a single doctor or not. Having a bipolar partner and having done a ton of research on the topic (as well as personal experience), I'd say find a different doctor who specializes in bipolar disorder. If your medications are not working right now, perhaps ...


1

Possibility 1. Not enough sleep It could be that 6-7 hours of sleep is not enough for you. Generally people need between 7 and 9 hours of sleep to be well-rested, but the exact amount varies from person to person. Sleeping 8 hours once is not enough to find out if you need more sleep. To find out how much sleep you really need: Wake up every morning at ...


1

I would suggest that the feeling of tiredness, even if you have slept, and wanting the work to end, are symptoms of a form of anxiety. If you google "mindfulness", you may find some helpful suggestions as to how to deal with this.


1

If you know you are not going to get much sleep in a night, try to time it such that you wake up on a 1.5 hour increment - 3, 4.5, or 6 hours of sleep. This is the average time per sleep cycle, so it will be much easier for you to wake up at the end of one. To make it through the next workday, I recommend coffee, eating light, and dressing appropriately so ...


1

Fellow insomniac here. These are some of the things that have been helping me cope: Learn how to deep breathe: it allows you to increase the amount of oxygen that goes into your bloodstream while preventing you from looking and sounding like you're hyperventilating :) Why? The more oxygen you get, the more alert you'll feel. Drink a BIG cup of water every ...


1

I don't notice a major difference if I snooze (heavily) or not. And yes, I have been a heavy user. The fact of snoozing is not a component that determines the quality of my day. What however does impact my day is the snooze duration. Opportunity cost. I think you have to reconsider why you want to snooze anyway? Answer: a lack of sleep and/or an unnatural ...


1

From personal experience, I don't notice a negative difference. If anything, I feel more ready to wake up after using snooze for another 30 minutes of precious sleep. I've never done it for more than that, though, so maybe there is a time limit before reaching the negative effect zone? Perhaps max 30 minutes allows you to stay in the Power nap area, instead ...


1

The most popular method I've heard of is the Polyphasic Sleep and a famous person who has been using it was Leonardo Da Vinci Da Vinci's sleeping schedule The Polyphasic Sleep method is based on the sleeping phases and takes advantage of the phase which gives rest to the brain, the REM phase. The idea of the method is to sleep only 4 hours a day by taking ...


1

In my personal case, go to bed at fixed time point everyday does not work for me at all. So I have developed another strategy that I thought worth sharing: Instead of going to bed at fixed point (e.g 2am), I would wake up at fixed time point (e.g 6 am). By doing that I can easily adjust to my situation everyday. For example sometimes I had a really busy day ...


1

Your case might be special - it's possible that you're one of the lucky few who can sleep very little without suffering from cognitive or emotional issues. That aside, it seems that the difficulty you have in going to sleep at a regular time is related to an impulsive desire to stay up and get stuff done. A few things that would help counteract this ...



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