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15

From experience, opening a new programming book is always exciting. I start reading (even the dedication, acknowledgements etc.), but gradually loose the vibe and get tired. Here are a few concepts that help me carry on: Divide and Conquer - in programming (and GTD), D&C is dividing a complex task into simpler ones that can be more easily tackled. Plan ...


7

I would avoid file type specific version control systems as having to look in too many places would not help your situation. For that reason I would recommend moving from SVN to Git for the repository for a few reasons. I know that would not be an easy task but keep reading for my reasoning. Git treats all file types the same (text, binary, etc.) Content ...


7

Evernote (http://evernote.com) can do what you're looking for, and more. It's cloud based and platform independent. You can attach an unlimited number (as far as I know) of tags to an item. You can create a tag hierarchy if you want to, although hierarchical retrieval isn't Evernote's strength. It will hold all the data types you mention.


6

Your doing everything right. I'd add find all the free podcasts and Youtube channels that cover the technologies you are interested in and stay up to date with these. For example I'm a .NET developer so follow DotNetRocks, Channel9 to name a few religiously. Also identify the people or teams who work on the technologies you use. If these people have a ...


5

Evernote can be used that simply, and has additional features you may find useful if you choose to make use of them. For offline use, you'll need to get a Pro subscription. The offline sync has been flawless for me in the 3+ years I've been using it. Some additional ways Evernote can help make your commute productive: clip web pages into Evernote for ...


5

Emacs org-mode is a very powerful solution which lets you (among other things) ... (see features overview on org-mode homepage) features and advantages for your application store text or code snippets work directly with source code do complex filtering and searching (regexp, etc.) in "agendas" assign multiple tags to each of the text snippets organize ...


5

If you can, read it later. There are dozens of great services, like Pocket or Instapaper, that allows you to save texts, files and even entire web-pages to read them later, when you have finished your other tasks. They are great, since you can also have offline versions of site-pages and you can install them on tablets/smartphones. This should prevent you ...


5

I suffered the exact problem. Over the years, I've learned a couple methods/tools that helped. But in general, it's more of a habit/process issue than the lack of hardware. I'll first talk about some tools: For browser tabs, I like 'one tab' or something like 'simple window saver' (for chrome). Just find a session managing extension that helps you quickly ...


5

I do this with Evernote and RememberTheMilk. In practice, an alert shows up in my task list that says "Review article XYZ" with a link. When I review it, I mark the task complete. The task will appear again after the repeat interval I selected. To make it all work has a number of steps that may sound overwhelming, but in practice is a mouse click here and a ...


4

I personally use FreePlane, which is an open-source mind mapping Java application. Mostly, I like the idea you can store information hierarchically. Among other things, you can: store your information hierarchically in nodes add notes to each node, which can be viewed in its own window (great for storing code snippets) add hyperlinks to URLs, or any file ...


3

The best thing I know is to browse Stack Overflow, which you already do. Whenever I encounter some new technology or toolbox in the world, I have already at least seen references to it at Stack Overflow. I would never feel so oriented without that unique presentation. Try to visit a local User Group and meet real people doing work that relates in some way ...


3

For most people, generating ideas is the easy part. The challenge in bringing an idea into reality is: designing and prototyping your idea validating the idea in the marketplace to ensure there is a customer base developing a functioning minimum viable product (MVP), delivered with just the right messaging and marketing That's why so many ideas and ...


3

Dropbox with the Packrat feature (has to be paid extra) turned on will keep an unlimited number of previous versions of any files you put in it. description taken from the Dropbox Homepage: Packrat is a feature that gives you unlimited deletion recovery and version history. By default, Dropbox saves a history of all deleted and earlier versions ...


3

From all the Android apps I've tried, I'd suggest Clockwork Tomato. It it's essentially a timer (offers a ton of settings, though) has a beautiful UI, you can also use the widget it offers for quicker launch, and can display history for all completed pomodoros, in columns for days, aligned by hour. It also has these two great options: to "include ...


3

Outlining with Emacs org-mode Emacs org-mode (http://orgmode.org/) should be able to do what you want. It is an outliner software, so it naturally supports a tree-like structure with headlines, sub-headlines, etc. You can add tags, categories and other metadata to each headline/bullet point There are very comfortable features for clocking time spent on ...


3

What i do to be "one of the updated" is less hands on courses on new techs but following hackers, who are well known in their respective communities, to get something like a birds eye view of the industry. This way you don't have to spend time going through the information right away, but you still have good chances to not miss anything usefull. You could, ...


3

You can compare softwares in this link: Comparison of notetaking software I suggest to you use google keep Browser: Mobile app: I suggest you to use google keep because: 1. Simple 2. MultiPlatform (Android, Chrome extension, browser based) 3. Integrate with other google services In google keep you can create: 1. Simple note 2. Check list 3. Image ...


3

Use OneTab. It is a Chrome/Firefox extension. It allows you to - with a single right click - move all your 500 tabs into a list that is then persistent. This is better than bookmarking them, especially if you only want to read them once and because bookmarking 500 items is a pain.


3

I also tend to "multitask" heavily on my Kubuntu Laptop, especially when working intensively on different projects as a college student. However I was pretty ok with it once I got a little bit organized. Additionally I have a heavy tendency to procrastination, so it is important as well for me to separate work from entertainment. I also work in 3, sometimes ...


3

Yes, that is normal. These systems can send an update out as soon as it happens, but it is also very likely that further along in the synchronization process they are polling/pushing with a certain interval, and not continuously. Also bear in mind that these systems are used by massive amounts of users, so even if everything was immediately put in execution ...


2

Spreed is a Chrome Browser Extension. You can use anywhere on the page. Just Select the text and press Alt+V. You can easily train yourself to read at 400 words per minute. This is an impressive tool.


2

There an online product called jendoux which allows you to customise your speed reading by choosing the group size of words. http://www.jendoux.com/


2

Maybe you can give Beeline Reader a try. BeeLine reader adds a color gradient to text to help you read faster and more accurately.


2

Mindmapping Mindmaps are able to visualize a hierarchical "tree" structure of data naturally. I recommend the free and open source mindmapping tool Freeplane (http://freeplane.sourceforge.net/) - I am using it myself and it has a lot of very nice and useful features. It manages and creates hierarchical structures easily and clearly arranged It lets you ...


2

TL;DR: Don't use Evernote as a to-do tool. I find Evernote to be a great place for reference material, but not for actual to-do lists that frequently change. For that, I use a mix of two other tools instead: workflowy.com is the most fantastic outliner I've ever seen. It's minimalistic in appearance but packs the perfect amount of functionality in a very ...


2

It is difficult not to multitask in the modern environment. I think simplifying can be an answer to your question. Try to create good organized bookmark system. Using bookmarks can be a good way to reduce the amount of tabs on your browser. Also general simplifying as one task per time is a good exercise to improve your productivity. I tend to use chrome ...


2

Bookmarking alternative Emacs org-mode. Using org-protocol, you can add links to your notes. My browser bookmark bar is empty; I had hundreds of old archived bookmark files that I had little hope of getting through. I converted them to org-mode files (probably using pandoc), and quickly sorted, cleaned out and extracted what I might actually need. So now, ...


1

Spreed is a Chrome Browser Extension. You can use anywhere on the page. Just Select the text and press Alt+V. You can easily train yourself to read at 400 words per minute.


1

You can also use a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) tool with your email. You can use many of them as plugins with your email client - gmail probably has the most options. Some like Capsule CRM have a nice button you click to sync up. You will, however, be committed to use the address book with the CRM.


1

Trello used for organization jobs by multiple users. I think is not suitable for to-do list. You can compare softwares in this link: Comparison of notetaking software I suggest to you use google keep Browser: Mobile app: I suggest you to use google keep because: 1. Simple 2. MultiPlatform (Android, Chrome extension, browser based) 3. Integrate with ...



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