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7

Never read anything less than a week old. 90% of news is unimportant by the next day. Only read stuff that stayed relevant for a full week. Ask yourself: do you want to know who won the Super Bowl or watch every play? You might want to watch every play because you like football, but from a productivity standpoint you only will ever need to know the winner - ...


4

https://pomotodo.com/ From the above: "Your todolist and Pomodoro records stay updated across all your devices. You can use Pomotodo anywhere and anytime you want, even offline!" "Contains full workflow management. Collect ideas, schedule works, finish tasks and review history right in the app." 'nuff said.


4

Ktimetracker Although I have no experience with this particular software, it might suit your needs. It's from KDE, so if you are using other Desktop Environment it might install a lot of dependencies. ktimetracker


4

I believe you already identified the problem: you're using way too many apps and this is taking too much of your time and bringing your productivity down. I would: Automate as much as possible. E.g. maybe buy one of those water bottles that already log your water intake? (Couldn't really recommend any particular brand.) The more you can make these systems ...


3

The most effective way to save time when doing a task is to stop doing it. The second best way is to delegate it to someone more competant than you are. And the third best is to automate it. With this in mind, your best bet is: Stop trying to keep up. Delegate the filtering process ot experts: Talk to people who have an interest in the subjects you want ...


2

I use Hamster. It meets all your requirements. I have mine set to track to the nearest 1/10 of an hour (6 minutes). If there is inactivity for that period, it stops tracking but also every 6 minutes a 5-second tiny window pops up in the corner to remind you as to which project you're currently tracking against...to included you're currently not tracking ...


2

There's two major forms of planning software. Task level planning Project level planning In the first bucket, you'll find applications like Omnifocus, Things and Wunderlist. These apps will help to manage your list of things to do and offer varying degrees of organization and planning control. Apps in this category are focused on your own list of tasks ...


2

I think cherrytree might be what you are looking for. http://www.giuspen.com/cherrytree/ You can insert check-boxes (Edit->Insert special character) and tick them or untick them with a click. http://www.giuspen.com/topic/cherrytree-on-mac-osx/ The image is from Linux, but it's also available for Windows. I don't see it for OSX, but somebody got it ...


2

If you already have a DropBox account, you can make a IFTTT recipe do the dirty job. But, you would be required to create an IFTTT account (plus a Dropbox one, if you don't already have).


2

I'm going to plug this free webapp that I made. PomoTrackr.com I track Pomodoros like it's a religion. Being self-employed I need it to stay focus. At the time, I couldn't find a Pomodoro App that accurately tracked my progress. Basically I wanted to see how I was doing last week, last month. Am I trending upwards or downwards etc. The History View is ...


2

Check out Todoist. It has apps for almost every platform, from mobile to web to your computer (Mac/PC/no Linux support at this time). They have "Sub tasks" and "Sub projects", which provide a hierarchy tree structure. Check out this screenshot to get an idea of how the tree structure appears visually. While not attached to metadata directly, I figured I'd ...


2

I have been using Workflowy.com to organize my to do lists. Granted it is very simple and doesn't offer repositories to my knowledge or calendar sync. It is more of a big picture of to do list that I use for both personal and work and is surprisingly effective in it's simplicity. I've tried many other project managers and task list services and this is ...


1

Build Focus Build Focus is a pomodoro timer, with built-in blocking, built around a city simulator. The city simulator itself is the pretty key part here: every time you complete a pomodoro your city gets a new building, or upgrade, but every time you get distracted a random building is demolished. Remarkably quickly the feedback loop means you get to the ...


1

arbtt seems to match your requirements. Configurable rules sort applications into tags, based on the active window but background ones can also be taken into account The docs show how to configure an idle timer. Hopefully this tracks both keyboard and mouse activity. Generates nice graphs with arbtt-graph (demo here) See also ulogme (screenshots here), ...


1

Habitbull sounds exactly like what you are looking for. An example of the interface is below. I believe you can link this to a fitbit, you would have to install this on your iOS or Android device, and set up a reminder to ask you for a yes/no completion.


1

The best way for me to ensure I keep reading technical books is to use Jerry Seinfeld's "Don't break the chain" concept. Have a calendar and decide on something you want to do every day. Put a big red X in each day that you do it and try not to go a day without doing it. There are a number of habit forming apps like coach.me to help record this but the best ...


1

If all you have is just an idea my recommendation is to make this idea more concrete. What are the requirements your software has? Write them all down. If you have a lot of requirements mark the important ones. Now you want to think about architecture: how should your implementation be structured? What parts should exist, and what are the interfaces in ...


1

From your requirements above, it would seem that Trello may be a good solution to your preferred organization system. A single Trello 'board' contains a system of 'lists' which can contain unlimited 'cards'. Each card can contain a variety of content including tags, links, files, etc. And Trello can very easily be setup for GTD use.


1

This is a great question. I asked myself the same question of a year or two ago and I figured out an effective way to do this. First, you need to know why you are reading. Is it for leisure, is it to learn the latest trends? Is it because you want to acquire knowledge on a particular topic? Once you have figured that out, you will find a bunch of ...


1

As I understand your question, incoming emails are distributed to all support group members. If your company uses MS Exchange, use a shared mailbox instead. It provides one mail adress and a shared mailbox. Everybody in the support group gets permission on that mailbox. You then can use e.g. categories to mark who works on which mail. Or edit the subject ...


1

Francois! I can recommend you the most simple way. There are two software - one is the simplest and most clear do-to list - it's Trello. The second is TimeCamp - time tracking software. They can be easily integrated and you have the best to-do and time tracking combination. You put your projects divided to tasks into Trello. Than the timer of TimeCamp ...


1

Fran├žois, You are already using one of the best tools - Todoist. Are you familiar with Getting Things Done (GTD) by David Allan? https://todoist.com/gtd Another app to consider (I don't know if you're looking for something that will run on your smartphone, your tablet, or your desktop and I don't know what operating system you are using) is: Fantastical - ...


1

I use IQTell to do everything: manage multiple email accounts, To Dos, multiple calendars, projects, contacts, Evernote, etc. I like that it has everything in one app. No need to cobble together a system of different tools. You can try it for free and see if it fits your needs


1

MyLifeOrganized app has a functionality to manage both tasks and projects. And you will be able to see this all in a single interface, or you can set up a special setting and see only the projects, or only personal to-dos. There are special views for that - you can choose, which tasks you would like to see right now. I don't use project functionality very ...


1

I use a very good program called my effectiveness pro check it may help you you can try to search for it in google play .. I consider it the best program as i tried many of them it can let you make plans for every day of the week and you can make a reminder .it let you categorize your tasks as urgent and important or urgent but not important and vice versa ...


1

CLI-based applications Org-mode Born as an Emacs mode, it is highly customizable and lets you do virtually everything. If you're into terminals, this can be your first choice. It has an official website and a rich selection of questions on StackOverflow. todo.txt Another good CLI-based application, it focuses on simplicity rather than richness of ...


1

let me give some suggestions for the points raised. I disagree that pen and paper is the best option. I did that also for years with copying across lists but this was far from effective. This is not to say electronic lists are inherently more effective, they need to be fast and fluid enough to be a good replacement. If you can find that(I come to this in ...


1

I got into the pomodoro technique after using focus@will. It's a service (not free, but not very expensive), which lets you play music that is optimized for productivity. The pomodoro timer is exceedingly simple, but does the job very well. It has a productivity tracker that lets you keep track of how focused you are, but that's about it. Again, it's ...


1

Check out this article. It lists 5 different ways to use GT from your desktop, which, I believe, includes what you're seeking. http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/five-killer-ways-to-use-google-tasks/


1

I like kanbanflow. It combines a kanban style to do list with the pomodoro method. I run it on my work computer through Chrome, and it has an Android and Iphone versions too.



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